Author Topic: Anyone Making Fresh Mozz?  (Read 3349 times)

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Offline randyjohnsonhve

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Anyone Making Fresh Mozz?
« on: February 01, 2010, 08:52:29 PM »
Is anyone out there making fresh mozz?...I finally have seemed to master it, and it produces a really creamy product...Really nice in neapolitan style pizzas...Would like to know if there is a difference between whole, 1% and 2% milk, I would think there is, but would like to know your experiences...Thanks, RJ
"Pizza Evolves...Our Best Pizza Ever is Not Today." It is 'what' is right, not 'who' is right that matters.


Offline norma427

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Re: Anyone Making Fresh Mozz?
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2010, 09:24:17 PM »
randyjohnsonhve,

I have made fresh mozzarella two times.  It really isn’t that hard.  The first time I made fresh mozzarella I used Tdeane’s (Terry’s) instructions at Reply # 205 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7561.200.html

The second time I went to apprenticship classes and made 30 minute mozzarella.  If you want to try this recipe here is the link: http://articles.lancasteronline.com/local/4/247675 and about fresh mozzarella making at http://articles.lancasteronline.com/local/4/247677  and http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10096.0.html

It really helps if you use raw milk.

Good luck in your mozzarella making!

Norma
« Last Edit: February 01, 2010, 09:26:31 PM by norma427 »
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline randyjohnsonhve

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Re: Anyone Making Fresh Mozz?
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2010, 09:32:36 PM »
Thanks for the new info Norma...Have you had experience with the different %'s of milk?   RJ
"Pizza Evolves...Our Best Pizza Ever is Not Today." It is 'what' is right, not 'who' is right that matters.

Offline norma427

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Re: Anyone Making Fresh Mozz?
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2010, 09:39:07 PM »
randyjohnsonhve,

Sorry I haven't had much experience, but from what most people tell me, it is best made with raw milk.  When I went to classes they made the fresh mozzarella with veal rennet.  It was delicious.  I am going to attend more classes.

The first time I made the fresh mozzarella, I made it with vegetable rennet.

Maybe someone with more experience can help you more.

Thanks,

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline verde

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Re: Anyone Making Fresh Mozz?
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2010, 09:35:38 PM »
I made fresh mozzarella for the first time a couple of days ago.  I got raw milk from a nearby farm.  Folks in my neighborhood just started a coop to do this.  I ended up with just over 1 lb of fresh mozzarella and one cup of ricotta from the gallon of cows milk.  I made a mozz/caper/oregano salad, and baked ziti with the products of my labor.  I'll be getting a shipment each week.  This week, I'll be making chevre from goat's milk.

Offline tdeane

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Re: Anyone Making Fresh Mozz?
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2010, 02:39:41 AM »
I would think the difference is less fat which is not a good thing. Keep making it with whole milk.

Offline dzpiez

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Re: Anyone Making Fresh Mozz?
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2010, 03:21:17 PM »
I tried it a few time, but can't get my hands on "raw" milk here in SoCal.  So now I order fresh curd from my local Italian grocery stort and heat, strech, and ball it up.  works and tastes great out of a WBO.

Offline ninapizza23

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Re: Anyone Making Fresh Mozz?
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2010, 10:07:57 PM »
dzpiez,

I use curd  from a restaurant supply co. The only problem is that it comes in 42lb box for about $2.25lb but in a cheese supply co website I found a list of milk that is suitable for cheesemaking available in your State.     
                                                                             California   
 Raw                           Orange County California
Mother's market one of our very few sources for raw milk is our local health food store. 
 Raw New Frontiers Natural Marketplace,
896 Foothill Blvd., San Louis Obispo, CA
(805) 785-0195.
Organic Pastures dairy,
located outside of Fresno, CA. source of raw milk for those cheesemakers who live on the central coast of California. The usual delivery is Sunday around 1 PM. Call their number, ask for the dairy department, and ask to speak to Cory, a very helpful guy who will set aside the amount you want to pick up. 
 Past Davis, CA.
Nugget Market and at the Davis Food Co-op Clover Farms Organic Whole milk
they say "Not Ultra Pasteurized" right on the label.
 
 Past? Carlsbad, CA. At Jimbo's Naturally on Calle  Organic milk 
 Past Bristol Farms
2080 N Bellflower Blvd, Long Beach, CA  I usually buy ALTA DENA milk, it is supposed to be hormone free (although it is not labeled organic) and it is available at most of our Southern California grocery stores
 Past People's Food Co-op,
4765 Voltaire, San Diego, CA Alta-Dena milk in San Diego works well for cheese. 
?? Past Straus Family Creamery Bay area and North
....they write:
Our milk is NOT ultra pasteurized. We use the HTST method. This means 170 degrees for 19 seconds. Note: some folks have reported this is problematic milk ... it is higher than normal past temps at 161F for 16 secs ... at 172 it becomes marginal milk for cheesemaking
 ? Claravale Dairy
Watsonville, CA
Santa Cruz, CA area (central Coast, CA - about 90 miles south of SF)
http://claravaledairy.com/index.html
 They have milk at New Leaf markets and Staff of Life. South of Santa Cruz, CA:
They sell raw, organic milk delicious!
 Past Bayview Farms whole milk
Lathrop, CA,
available at most Raley's stores in the Bay Area This sets a more abundant curd than even some of the organic milks available here. It is homogenized and pasteurized, NOT ultra-pasteurized.
NOTE: I have had at least one customer report that this is heated to 177F and held for 27 secs and no longer works for making mozz
 
 Raw Organic Pastures
Fresno, CA.
http://organicpastures.com The BEST is the raw milk from Organic Pastures in Fresno, CA.
 
 Past Whole Foods in Walnut Creek
has Clover and Strauss Family Creamery  both taste great and are NOT ultra pasteurized.
 Past I have used Straus milk with great success. Their cream top whole milk is incredible.
http://www.strausfamilycreamery.com/

I have also used Horizon milk.
http://www.horizondairy.com/ I have made the mozzarella cheese 3 times and my family and I have loved it every time 
  Julie Foley
Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery Sebastopol, CA
contact@redwoodhill.net
www. Redwoodhill.com)
(707) 823.8250 x102 We are a goat farm and creamery located about one hour north of San Francisco which produces goat’s milk .   I have steered many of our cheese-making inquiring customers towards your website. Our milk can be found in many Whole Foods Markets as well as other natural food stores within the San Francisco area.
 

Offline jcamador

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Re: Anyone Making Fresh Mozz?
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2010, 06:11:50 PM »
I just started making my homemade mozz not too long ago. The first few times I used whole milk from the store and citric acid to acidify the milk as shown in "30 minute mozzarella" instructions. My curds never really came together and the end product was very rubbery and flat tasting...until I made a few important (in my view) changes.

I started buying cream top, un-homogenized whole milk from the local coop. This milk is pasteurized which is ok. I ripen the milk by adding a thermophilic culture, calf lipase, then rennet. No citric acid. I could tell a big difference between using citric acid and not because with the culture the final cheese was buttery and it finally had that mozzarella taste.

Doing it this way takes a lot longer than 30 minutes...usually 5-7 hours depending on temperature and ph levels, but I will say the the final product is great.
jason

scott123

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Re: Anyone Making Fresh Mozz?
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2010, 07:19:41 PM »
Jason, you mentioned that the lipase cheese was 'buttery.' I'm curious, was it actually yellow?

I'm trying to understand where yellowish mozz comes from.  Brick supermarket mozz has a tendency to be white but a little translucent, while fresh mozz is usually very white and very opaque. Grande, on the other hand, has a very distinctive yellow tint.

It's a just a hunch, but I believe that yellower cheese has a greater resistance to higher heats, and I'd like to try to recreate this at home. In other words, I can get a gallon of milk for $2.30, and, in theory, I can get as much as a pound of cheese from it, but... if it's going to be a pound of wet, white, look-at-it-the-wrong-way-and-it-curdles cheese, then it's not worth the trouble. I need something that can really bubble and brown and not end up a bunch of white specs floating in a puddle of whey.


Offline jcamador

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Re: Anyone Making Fresh Mozz?
« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2010, 08:49:18 PM »
Scott - the cheese was a pale white, not strikingly white, but it had a smooth,velvety mouth-feel with a slight buttery taste. From what I gather, the yellow in cheese actually comes from a pigment in the grass the cows eat, but to make it consistently yellow, companies will sometimes add food coloring in the process.

This cheese melted well and bubbled without separating into a mess. Actually, when I first started making mozz with the citric acid, the cheese did separate like you said. I think taking the slow approach to developing the curds makes it hold together better under heat..not sure, but just a hunch.

I should also add that once the curds are stretched and formed into a ball, brick, or whatever, it tastes and holds together better when aged a day or two.
jason