Author Topic: What's the difference? ADY/IDY  (Read 1371 times)

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Offline fireman117

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What's the difference? ADY/IDY
« on: April 09, 2010, 03:53:23 PM »
Hi Everyone,
I could use a little help here. I have been using Red Star ADY for the last couple of pies using the %'s supplied by Peter for the Lehmann recipe, and the results have been very good. (see my post pizza gets rave reviews from wife). A friend of mine gave me some fresh IDY from SAF. She swears by it, but I'm not too sure how that affects the recipe. If anyone could help me sort this out I'd really appreciate it.

Thank you,
Eric


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: What's the difference? ADY/IDY
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2010, 04:06:55 PM »
A friend of mine gave me some fresh IDY from SAF.


Fresh? The "D" in IDY stands for "dry" which I would not call "fresh". Check the glossary of this forum under "Active Dry Yeast" and "Instant Dry Yeast" to see if that answers your question.


Offline fireman117

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Re: What's the difference? ADY/IDY
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2010, 04:11:43 PM »
Thanks,

I'll take a look.  Just a clarification. I used the term "fresh" as in just purchased.

Eric

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: What's the difference? ADY/IDY
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2010, 04:12:36 PM »
That's what I figured.

Offline Puzzolento

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Re: What's the difference? ADY/IDY
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2010, 04:19:29 PM »
When you first buy IDY, it practically explodes. As time passes, it will poop out, and you may not realize it until you get a fresh batch. I assume this is true of ADY, too, but I won't generalize without being sure.

Offline dms

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Re: What's the difference? ADY/IDY
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2010, 06:12:02 PM »
Hi Everyone,
I could use a little help here. I have been using Red Star ADY for the last couple of pies using the %'s supplied by Peter for the Lehmann recipe, and the results have been very good. (see my post pizza gets rave reviews from wife). A friend of mine gave me some fresh IDY from SAF. She swears by it, but I'm not too sure how that affects the recipe. If anyone could help me sort this out I'd really appreciate it.

Thank you,
Eric

IDY has increased activity, better storage life.  You can use a bit less (15 to 25%, by mass) than ADY (but if you dno't, you may not notice a difference, depending on recipe and conditions).  The big win for most purposes is that it doesn't need to be rehydrated. 

Offline hotsawce

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Re: What's the difference? ADY/IDY
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2010, 01:42:16 PM »
When you first buy IDY, it practically explodes. As time passes, it will poop out, and you may not realize it until you get a fresh batch. I assume this is true of ADY, too, but I won't generalize without being sure.

It's really funny you mention this.

I just picked up all my pizza stuff at BJs today because I was running out. Got 2 huge things of IDY for about 3 bucks.

Used the same recipe I always used, with the 2 hour bulk ferment and overnight cold ferment in balls...checked them this morning...and it seems like the new yeast is MUCH more active.

How long does this last for? And how long until the yeast are basically useless? I have the one opened pack in my freezer in a sealable bag now.

Offline Puzzolento

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Re: What's the difference? ADY/IDY
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2010, 05:47:20 PM »
I don't really know. I store it improperly, on the counter, and it seems to work fine for at least a few months. It's so cheap at GFS, I replace it every three months or so even if it's going strong. Seems like it's smarter to keep fresh yeast on hand and gauge recipes by its most violent rises, which ought to be fairly uniform in nature, rather than using old yeast with widely varying performance. Maybe this is wrong.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2010, 05:49:04 PM by Puzzolento »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: What's the difference? ADY/IDY
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2010, 08:00:34 PM »
If I were a professional, I most likely would be going through enough yeast on a regular basis such that its degradation with time and exposure to atmospheric oxygen and moisture would not be an issue. However, it is true that an opened packet or bag of IDY or ADY will lose some of its leavening power as compared with a fresh supply, even if stored in an airtight container and kept in the freezer. However, modern yeast strains have been developed to tolerate longer storage periods and temperature. In my case, I store my ADY and IDY in airtight containers that are held in my freezer compartment. Because of loss of leavening power with age, my practice is to increase a measured amount of the yeast by a small amount. In the past, I have had bags of IDY that have lasted for several years. It would take specialized laboratory equipment to be able to measure the degree of degradation of the performance of yeast with age and, without such equipment, I am not sure that I can perform a simple and reliable side-by-side experiment in a home kitchen environment to be able to measure the differences in leavening power. But there is no doubt that the optimum performance will be achieved using a fresh supply of ADY or IDY. All of these issues are inherently moving targets. For example, the same yeast in a cold climate or an excessively humid environment will perform differently in a warm climate or a dry environment. Also, different people measure out yeast differently, often with different shapes and designs of measuring spoons, and some use different quantitative standards, like scant, level and heaping. I personally use level measuring spoons. Others may use special scales that can weigh small amounts of lightweight ingredients like yeast.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 24, 2013, 08:45:21 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline fireman117

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Re: What's the difference? ADY/IDY
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2010, 11:55:18 AM »
Does anyone think there is much difference between brands. Common ones around here are Red Star, SAF, and Fleischman's. I've been using Red Star ADR, adding it to my dry ingredients, then add the water stir until combined, then I put a towel over the mixer bowl and let it sit for 10 mins. Seems to work, but maybe there's a better way?

Thanks,
Eric


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: What's the difference? ADY/IDY
« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2010, 01:31:10 PM »
Eric,

Some people prefer one brand of yeast over another, for whatever reason. Since I started with a one-pound bag of SAF Red IDY, which took me years to use up, I developed a preference for that product and did not try what would be the equivalent product from Fleischmann's. However, if there are differences, I don't think that they would be material.

With respect to the way that ADY should be used, there are two recommendations from yeast producers. The first is to rehydrate the ADY in a small portion of the total formula water (about 4-5 times the weight of the ADY) at around 105 degrees F for about 10 minutes, and add the rehydrated ADY to either the rest of the formula water, which usually should be on the cool side, or to the rest of the ingredients in the mixer bowl. The second method is to add the ADY dry to all or a portion of the formula flour and add water that is around 120-130 degrees F. Most of the time, I use the former method.

Peter


 

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