Author Topic: Salt in New York Style Crust  (Read 1578 times)

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Offline AJ72

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Salt in New York Style Crust
« on: April 17, 2010, 10:54:47 PM »
Hi guys,
I live in Eastern PA and most Pizzeria's in my area have a rather salty crust which I have become used to.  When I make pizza, I use the Lehmann NY Dough which calls for 1.75% salt but I find it much less salty than the crusts I get around here.  I would like to increase the amount of salt in the Lehmann Dough but don't want to make it too salty and ruin the batch.  So I figured I would get some more info here first about salt percentages in NY Style Doughs.  I see that Glutenboy's recipe uses 2.5% salt and I was gonna try this amount next.  So my question is what would be considered too much salt in a crust.  I know this is subjective and the typical answer would be to try several batches and see what you like, but the reason I'm asking is because I usually have guests over and I don't want to spoil it for everybody just because I like it salty.  What should be considered the maximum percentage of salt used in a NY Style Dough?

Thanks,
Tony


Offline Bob1

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Re: Salt in New York Style Crust
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2010, 09:46:55 AM »
Judging by the average percents used 1.5 to 2.5 It is a very powerful ingredient.  I have never went over 2.75 and usually hang out at 1.5 to 1.75.  I would gues that three would start getting pretty bad.  Are you sure that the pizza you are used to does not have a lot of salt in the sauce that adds to the effect?

Bob

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Salt in New York Style Crust
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2010, 10:21:39 AM »
Tony,

That's a good question but one that may be difficult to answer because of personal preferences. What I would be interested in knowing is what our members have been using in their cold fermented NY style doughs where the salt is above about 2%. I picked that number because it falls in line with the amount of salt often used in bread doughs. For example, see the King Arthur piece on salt at http://www.kingarthurflour.com/professional/salt.html. Also, when I checked the dough recipes in Professor Calvel's book The Taste of Bread, the predominant salt value for a basic, non-specialty French bread was 2%. There were a few recipes at 1.8% and one that was at 2.2-2.3%, but the latter amount was for a bread recipe (involving the intensive mixing method) that Prof. Calvel did not recommend.

As another frame of reference, one might consider the salt levels used in acrobatic doughs. For such doughs, the salt can get to close to 4%. One example, at 3.91% salt, is the dough recipe at the PMQ Think Tank Recipe bank at http://www.pmq.com/Recipe-Bank/index.php/name/Acrobatic-Training-Dough/record/57732/. That is a recipe that Tony Gemignani apparently used at one time. Acrobatic doughs are not intended for consumption.

In terms of what our members have used for the NY style dough, you already noted the 2.5% salt level used by Glutenboy. At http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10714.msg95352.html#msg95352, you will see that LaPizzaBrutta used a NY style dough recipe with 3.42% salt. tdeane (Terry) says that he uses anywhere from 2.5-3%. A related point that you should keep in mind is that at high salt levels, the salt can slow down the fermentation process. As a result, if you are not careful with your timing, you can end up with an underfermented dough at the time you plan to use the dough. As you can see under the section "Osmotic Pressure" at http://www.theartisan.net/dough_development.htm, salt exerts an inhibitory effect on yeast activity once it gets above 1.5%. Remember also that Glutenboy's dough can last for several days (e.g, up to about 8 days) and LaPizzaBrutta's dough was a 15-day old dough. So, salt's effect is not limited to its taste effect in the crust. It has many other effects.

Bob1 also raises an important point. In addition to looking at the salt at the dough level, you should also consider how much salt is used in the sauce and also the cheeses and toppings, especially meat toppings like pepperoni and sausage that contain high salt levels.

Please let us know what amount of salt you elect to use and with what results.

Peter
« Last Edit: January 25, 2013, 08:51:03 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline tcarlisle

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Re: Salt in New York Style Crust
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2010, 10:01:47 AM »
Both in bread baking and pizza, I find that lower percentages of salt produce a bland outcome. My recipe is about 2.25% salt -- diamond crystal kosher salt to be exact. This level of salt, for me, does not result in a crust that you taste and detect it as "salty". If what you are used to actually seems salty, that might be a bit much. Personally, I wouldn't want the salt to overpower the rest of the flavors. But even my salt percentage is considered higher than most recipes.

As Pete mentions, salt has an impact of fermentation that must be considered.

Offline pizzadoughboy

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Re: Salt in New York Style Crust
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2010, 09:05:40 PM »
In my NY pies I've found that anything over 1.9% starts to become noticeable and has a "bready" taste to it.  I don't like a "bready/salty" crust but even when I've used up to 3% people eating mine didn't complain.  All depends on personal preference I suppose.  I'd go with 2% and that might give you the best of both worlds.

Hope it helps.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Salt in New York Style Crust
« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2010, 09:15:18 PM »
As a further frame of reference, on average, seawater in the world's oceans has a salinity of about 3.5% (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seawater).

Peter

Offline pizzadoughboy

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Re: Salt in New York Style Crust
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2010, 01:33:34 PM »
I would've thought seawater was higher than that. I'm sure we all have gotten some seawater in our mouth at some time and dang that stuff is strong.  :-D

Offline Randy

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Re: Salt in New York Style Crust
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2010, 01:42:19 PM »
Just to add a bit.  Salt controls the rise as well.  More salt less rise.  Less salt, more rise.

Randy