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Offline Jackie Tran

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Mystery flour Challenge
« on: July 28, 2010, 08:02:15 PM »
So I will be taking the mystery flour challenge tonight.  What is the mystery flour challenge?  Well back some weeks I put out a request for members to send me some mystery flour and I would attempt to make some pizza with it by feel.  It could be any type of flour (AP, BF, HG, pastry, 00, etc) or a blend of flours.  Member Bradyshaw generously took me up on the challenge and sent me some flour to work with.   I've had the flour for a few weeks now and have been gearing up for the challenge. 

I have no idea what type of flour he sent me but will make pizza dough by "feel".  I don't have a lot of experience in this area, but have been practicing a bit lately.   I will start with a premeasured amount of water, salt, oil, & yeast for an approximate size doughball of 170-180gm.   The flour amount I will use and the end hydration ratio will be unknown to me until after the fact.   I will shoot for a 74-75% HR if the flour is high protein, 70-20% HR for a moderate protein flour, and 66% or so for a lower protein flour.   After I finish making the balls, I will calculate the HR and try to guestimate what the protein level of the flour actually is by the HR or by how much water was taken up by the flour.   

I have no idea if I will succeed in this experiment, but it should be fun.

I will also bake one pie in the MBE and one in the home oven.  The challenge for me is to make some great pizzas not just edible pizzas.   

Ok I need to go mix up some dough.  If anyone has any suggestions or stipulations they'd like to see let me know.   I'll post pics of the flour and my progress to follow.

JT
« Last Edit: August 02, 2010, 10:45:15 PM by Jackie Tran »


Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2010, 08:34:58 PM »
Here are some pics of the flour and initial impressions. 

Paul has sent me 412gm of this mystery flour.  By looking at the color, it doesn't appear to be "bleached".  By virtue of it not being bleached, I will also assume that it is not bromated as well.

For 2 doughballs of approximately 180gm, I decided to use a previously test recipe using...

160 gm water (80F)
1 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp ADY (should be ~ 0.8%)
1 tsp OO (~2%+)

I chose 180 gm doughballs b/c I plan to stretch one out to about 10-11" and bake in my MBE.  That's about the max size I can bake in the MBE.  The other doughball can be bigger since it will bake in the oven. 

I started out by mixing the water, salt, oil, and ADY and stir to dissolve.  Next I measured out 300gm of the 412gm of flour.  I will not use all of this flour but will subtract the difference to see how much I end up using.   

After dissolving the salt, ADY, and oil I added flour and stirred to get an even mixture similar to a thick pancake batter consistency.  I'll let this autolyse for about 20 min or so.  My first impressions of the flour is that it is not a HG flour by the way it absorbs water.  I would also say it is not a 00 flour or pastry flour (low protein).  It seems to be absorbing water similar to a typical bread flour.   Of course it could also be a mix of HG and a low protein flour, I don't know. 

« Last Edit: July 28, 2010, 10:36:12 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2010, 09:24:28 PM »
So after a 20min autolyse, I began adding flour in and mixing using my usual minimal pressure minimal kneading technique.  I stop adding flour in when I achieve a certain feel that I like to the dough.  That's minimal sticking and still a very soft and moist pliable dough. 

Below is a picture of the dough after initial kneading of about 6 minutes or so.  I will let this bulk rise for about an hour or so.  At that point I will add some more bench flour and reball them.  I may also do a few stretch and folds to incorporate some air bubbles into the dough.  The dough will then continue to ferment (proof) at room temps (76F) for another couple of hours.   I'm wanting to bake these within 3 hours from start to finish.  I would also like to see the doughballs (after dividing and balling) to double in size.

So far I have used 206 gm of the 300gm.  My initial hydration ratio is 160gm water divided by 206gm flour = 77.6% hydration ratio.  I will likely use up another 2 gm of bench flour by the end of the process giving me an estimated 77% HR.   So far my susupicions about it being a BF may be off.  By the way it's absorbing water, it's acting more like my Sam's Club HG bleached and bromated flour which I assume is about 14% (but I'm not sure about that either).   :-[

Also the initial doughball is about 349gm which should give me about 2 balls that are around 175gm each. 
« Last Edit: August 02, 2010, 10:48:46 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2010, 10:02:30 PM »
So the doughball has bulk risen for about 1 hour and it has been about 1.5h since the yeast hit the water.   The doughball has flattened out a bit.   It was divided and the balls were folded and balled to trap some air.  I used 2 different folding techniques so the balls look like different sizes but are relatively the same weight.   

I also used 2 gm of bench flour when balling these up so the final HR is 76.9% or 77%.  This is fairly consistent with what I've been doing when using the Sam's club HG flour.  I've been averaging about 75-76% HR. 

So far the dough feels very nice.  It's also looking very consistent and giving me some good vibes so i hope the bakes come out well.   Paul, so far I'm REALLY liking this flour. 

With my bake 2 nights ago, I cracked my polished porcelain stone for the MBE so I will be improvising and baking on quarry tiles in the MBE tonight.  It shouldn't make much of a difference.   b/c the dough is acting like a HG dough I will be baking it around a temp of 680-700f.  I will be shooting for a bake time of 3-3.5m.   

For the oven bake I will be baking on a glazed primo stone with a pan underneath it.  I plan on preheating the oven at 500F for an hour or so.  I will then move the stone under the broiler for about 15 min to get the stone temp up towards 800.  I will then move it down towards the bottom of the oven away from the heat source and let the stone temp go down to about 720F.  I load the pie then with the temp turned down to 500 and the convection fan turned on.   I plan to bake it for about 4 min until the top rim gets browned.  I may or may not dome it against the broiler depending on how dark the color is.

« Last Edit: July 28, 2010, 10:04:12 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2010, 11:13:30 PM »
okay bake is done.  I was very satisfied with one pie and not the other.   I had an MBE mishap. :-D

Been fooling around in the kitchen way too much tonight, so I need to go spend some TV time with the Mrs.  Will update later tonight or tomorrow.   ;D

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2010, 01:29:14 AM »
OK so here are the results of the mystery flour challenge.

First bake was the MBE bake.  I had decide to use 2 different fold techniques for trapping air bubbles.  Each technique was applied to each ball. We'll just call them fold technique #1 and FT #2.

FT#1 created a tighter ball initially and was evident after the balls had proofed for an hour or so.  That particular ball seem to hold it's shape better than the one using FT#2.    Being that I normally get a better oven spring in the MBE, I decided to use the ball with FT#2 (flatter ball) for the MBE bake and save the better looking ball for the oven. 

Well when I went to stretch out the ball with FT#2 for the MBE bake, it was very hard to open evenly.  The dough was so slack and pliable it was almost unmanageable.  Now I routinely work with doughs with HR's in the mid 70's and granted these were the highest HR's I have used yet at 77%.  But it just seem odd that it so slack.  I initially thought I had overproofed these. 

So that was mishap #1 for the MBE bake.  Mishap #2 for the MBE bake was that my polished porcelain stone had crack 2 days ago when I spilled a bit of sauce on the hot stone.  My normal setup is quarry tiles on the bottom and the polished stone on top.  Well I decide to move all the pieces of the polished stone to the bottom and put the 4 quarry tiles on top.  I was confident it wouldn't be a problem.  The MBE pie was baked at around 720 for 3 mins.

Well turns out when I went to load the pie the metal peel caught on one of the quarry tiles and shifted them a bit.  I didn't realize it at the time but that had pushed some of the cracked polished stone pieces to the sides blocking some valuable air flow.  I know I had uneven heating coming up from around the quarry tiled hearth. 

Needless to say, I did not get the oven spring I'm use to in the MBE.  The pie still tasted ok, but it wasn't the pie I had in mind. 

Here are pics of the slack skin and the jacked up stone. 
« Last Edit: August 02, 2010, 10:52:39 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2010, 01:37:32 AM »
Here's the one made in the oven using FT#1.  I was expecting this dough to behave poorly like the first one but to my surprise it opened up a lot nicer.  It just had better gluten structure due to the different fold technique applied.  Both balls were from the same batch yet opened and baked up very different.

This ball was not opened up as big as the one baked in the MBE.  This ball didn't seem to stretch apart uncontrollable like the first one did.  It also got much better oven spring than I expected for a home oven bake.   I'm attributing it's immense home oven spring to the FT#1, the high hydration ratio, and relatively high stone temp 700F.  It baked in the oven with a stone temp of 712F and bake near the bottom away from the heat source.  this was done so that i could achieve a longer bake time without browning the rim too quickly.  it baked for about 4 mins.

To my surprise the oven baked pie turned out much better in terms of texture.  It was on par with one of my perfect pies.  Crispy rim and airy crumb. 

Pic 1 shows the FT#1 (oven bake) on the left.  Notice it's nicer prebake shape.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2010, 10:54:01 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #7 on: July 29, 2010, 01:39:35 AM »
A few obligatory crumb shots.

Pic #1 is a crumb shot of the MBE pie (the jacked up one).
The rest of the pics are from the oven baked pie. 

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2010, 01:43:12 AM »
Tomorrow I'll be buying a cheapie 12" pizza stone to replace the polished porcelain stone.
Luckily I have enough flour left to repeat the MBE bake using the same formula.  This time I'll lower the hydration 1-2% and use the better fold technique (FT#1).

Overall, I would say that this flour challenge was very successful.  I was able to achieve several goals. 

1) I was able to accomplish my goal of making pizza with a mystery flour based on feel and get a consistent HR.
2) I was able to get a good oven spring and crust texture in the home oven, thus duplicating my once mysterious & lofty crust.   
3) I was able to compare 2 different dough folding patterns I've used in the past and see the difference they made to pizza dough. 
4) further dial in my favored hydration ratio, bake times and temps. 

I still have no idea what flour Paul sent me but i suspect it is either a HG BF or HG flour around 14% protein or so.  Paul let me know if I'm way off here.   

It was also interesting to note that the MBE bake produced a bit more leoparding than the home oven bake, likely due to the hotter heat in proximity to the rim.  I was also surprise to see a bit of leoparding considering the % of oil used in the dough formulation. 
« Last Edit: July 29, 2010, 01:52:32 AM by Jackie Tran »


brayshaw

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2010, 05:04:37 AM »
Absolutely awesome thread Chau! What did you think of the tomatoes? Do you want me to reveal the flour or wait until you are finished with it?

Paul

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2010, 05:50:25 AM »
I'm pretty sure I know what the flour is, but I'll give Paul the honor of the reveal  ;D

Chau, this is extremely helpful in confirming that the specs on Paul's flour are well within the operating parameters of the flours we have at our disposal on this side of the pond. The fact that it was able to absorb that much water and still be relatively manageable is very encouraging.

Well done. Pie #2 looks fantastic.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2010, 10:24:23 AM by scott123 »

Offline norma427

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2010, 06:41:03 AM »
Jackie Tran,

I find your using the mystery flour thread very interesting.  You are very adaptable in making a dough and also making pizzas in different oven set-ups.  Both of your pies look delicious.  I also really like pie number 2. 

Great experiment,  ;D

Norma

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #12 on: July 29, 2010, 10:41:59 AM »
Absolutely awesome thread Chau! What did you think of the tomatoes? Do you want me to reveal the flour or wait until you are finished with it?

Paul

Thank you Paul again for sending the flour all the way from England and for sending the tomatoes as well. 
Paul wanted me to try out a can of the San Marzano tomatoes he uses.   Paul if I had to rate it on a scale of 1-10, I would say they are about a good 7-8.  The tomatoes were very good.  They had a very FRESH taste to them, with just a pinch of acidity.    I used an immersion stick blender and then strained the solids to the consistency that I like.   I added some Ganji Dante oregano, a bit of good OO, and a couple of pinches of natural stevia sweetner.   

I was spoiled by the Staunilaus Super Dolce and like a sweet sauce so i did sweeten the tomatoes a bit but not much.  The SMs outshine the SD and Eschalon's 6 in 1s in the fresh department.  Very little citric acid taste compared to the SD and 6n1s and more FRESH taste.  Slightly less tomatoey taste than 6n1s and less than SD especially after baking.  But overall a good tomato. 

I also took the left over juice and added a few ice cubes and made a nice refreshing tomato drink.  AWESOME! 

Flour - I had suspected that you had sent me some of your new flour to try out.  If so that was quite clever Paul.  IMO, you have a high quality flour there.  I toasted up a couple of slices of the oven baked pie for breakfast this morning and it was quite good. 

I'm curious to know the protein content of this flour.  Go ahead and let me know.  I don't plan to do anything drastically different when I remake the MBE pie.  I dont recall what protein level your current flour is off the top of my head.  I would guest it is a HG BF unbleached unbromated with a protein content of around 13-14%.  Probably closer to 14?  I'm guessing here.   :-D

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #13 on: July 29, 2010, 10:48:38 AM »
I'm pretty sure I know what the flour is, but I'll give Paul the honor of the reveal  ;D

Chau, this is extremely helpful in confirming that the specs on Paul's flour are well within the operating parameters of the flours we have at our disposal on this side of the pond. The fact that it was able to absorb that much water and still be relatively manageable is very encouraging.

Well done. Pie #2 looks fantastic.

Thank you Scott, I have you to thank for much of my recent progress.   Okay, I'll stop saying that.   :angel:
Pie #1 (MBE) was suppose to be the better pie, but I was very pleased with pie #2.  It was very personally satisfying to me to have the oven bake pie turn out as it did.  It definitely deserves (in my book) a spot next to my 1st perfect pie made accidently way back when.  I feel fortunate to have reverse engineered my own pie.  It has taken a good part of 6 months to do that but it's done.   :chef:

These were the highest hydrated doughs I've worked with yet, especially having oil in them makes it even more significant.  Pie #2 was only manageable b/c I added in my super secret folding technique.  :-D  Without it the dough was too slack and unmanageable.  Nothing a little extra kneading couldn't mitigate though. 

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #14 on: July 29, 2010, 11:05:30 AM »
Jackie Tran,

I find your using the mystery flour thread very interesting.  You are very adaptable in making a dough and also making pizzas in different oven set-ups.  Both of your pies look delicious.  I also really like pie number 2. 

Great experiment,  ;D

Norma

Norma, I wanted to point this out to you b/c I think you would appreciate it.  You have been posting that you feel that the amount of oven spring you experience in your own pies are due to 1) the particular formula you are using and 2) the way the dough is managed or handled.

Both Peter and I agreed that 1) is particularly true b/c of the many various factors that affect ovenspring are intimately tied to the dough.   But what I found interesting about this experiment b/t 2 different dough folding patterns is that it made a dramatic difference in the way the dough proofed up, opened up, and baked up (oven spring). 

In my mind, it verifies your theory that dough management does indeed affect oven spring. 

Another important point to mention here is that oven spring is dependant on sufficient gluten matrix structure.  A lack of that and the oven spring suffers as seen in the MBE baked pie.   At first I presumed that the smaller amount of oven spring in that pie was due to the blocked airflow.  Yes it does affect it but only to a small percent.  The airflow wasn't block all the way around and there was still sufficient heat to brown the top.   The lack of oven spring in that pie was mainly due to the poor/less gluten structure compare to the oven baked pie with FT#1.  Basically FT#2 is a lot less than FT#1, less drastic.  You can see it in the proofing of the dough, I felt the difference in the opening of the dough, and then saw the difference in the bake up. 

Had the MBE dough recieved the same treatment it would have at least gotten equal or better oven spring than the oven baked pie as the heat is more even and concentrated in the MBE. 

There is a definite balance between high hydration, gluten matrix/structure development, and heat to get the optimal amount of spring.   In the MBE bake above, the hydration was too high for the amount of gluten development and thus the oven spring suffered amount other ill effects (increase pliability and poor opening characteristics). 

Do I sound like a crazy person or what?  >:D

Chau
« Last Edit: July 29, 2010, 11:08:58 AM by Jackie Tran »

Offline norma427

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #15 on: July 29, 2010, 11:58:59 AM »
Jackie Tran,

You are not crazy, because everything you do with one dough can affect how the outcome will be.  Whether it is the flour, yeast, hydration, water temp, room temp, olive oil, mixing methods, salt,  handling methods, oven set-ups, proof times and many other variables all come into play.  You are doing a great job of understanding all of this. 

I made a one batch of dough at market a little over a month ago and was busy trying to do too many things at once.  I forgot to add the olive oil at the end of my mix.  I saw when I went to mix the next dough batch I forgot the olive oil.  I decided not to re-mix and see what would happen.  Those dough balls baked up completely different and no matter how long the pies baked, the bottom of the crust was not crisp.  After a few pies, I discarded the dough balls.  That was just one variable and it made a difference in my pies.

I also agree there is a delicate balance in getting everything together to achieve what you want.  Glad to see you got such a great bake in your home oven.  ;D

Norma
« Last Edit: July 29, 2010, 12:47:30 PM by norma427 »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #16 on: July 29, 2010, 12:29:46 PM »
Thanks for telling me the results of your bake without the oil.  My next experiment(s) will be testing out the effects of oil on the finished crust and crumb.  and thanks for confirming my sanity.  :-D

Chau



brayshaw

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #17 on: July 29, 2010, 02:59:42 PM »
What a brilliant read! I am going to read it all back a number of times.
Chau, the flour was.............Manitoba! The one I will be using for
my business and Marriages Millers say it should be around 13.7%protein.

Again, great thread Chau and please post pics of the final pizza if you can.

Scott I have a strong feeing you knew the flour straight away! Lol

brayshaw

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #18 on: July 29, 2010, 03:02:08 PM »
Think of the air miles that flour has had! Haha.
Canada>England>New Mexico!

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #19 on: July 29, 2010, 03:10:14 PM »
What a brilliant read! I am going to read it all back a number of times.
Chau, the flour was.............Manitoba! The one I will be using for
my business and Marriages Millers say it should be around 13.7%protein.

Again, great thread Chau and please post pics of the final pizza if you can.

Scott I have a strong feeing you knew the flour straight away! Lol

Ahhh, you are too kind to me Paul.  What was the protein content ?? What did you say?? 13.7% ??  LOL,  I got lucky with my guess.   I sometimes say a blind squirrel finds a nut every now and then.   :-D
Seriously you have a great flour there.  If I can't get a better result with my Sam's club flour after a few more tries, I'll see about ordering a bag of this stuff when I'm done with my 50lbs of HG flour. 

Is this stuff considered BF or HG?  or a HG BF?  Not bleached or bromated right?

Paul, the more I read and with the limited experience I have, I'm starting to believe that a BF or HG BF is better for pizza than a HG flour or even a bromated flour but I dunno for sure. 

Cheers mate,
Chau

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #20 on: July 30, 2010, 10:53:58 AM »
Ahhh, you are too kind to me Paul.  What was the protein content ?? What did you say?? 13.7% ??  LOL,  I got lucky with my guess.   I sometimes say a blind squirrel finds a nut every now and then.   :-D
Seriously you have a great flour there.  If I can't get a better result with my Sam's club flour after a few more tries, I'll see about ordering a bag of this stuff when I'm done with my 50lbs of HG flour. 

Is this stuff considered BF or HG?  or a HG BF?  Not bleached or bromated right?

Paul, the more I read and with the limited experience I have, I'm starting to believe that a BF or HG BF is better for pizza than a HG flour or even a bromated flour but I dunno for sure. 

Cheers mate,
Chau


Yes I did say 13.7%! lol. Good guess ;D
I emailed the millers again yesterday begging for a spec sheet on that flour and I think I may be in luck this time, so if they send me it I will post it here for you Chau. I'm glad you liked the flour, it's by far the best I have tried.
What are flour prices like over there? The Manitoba flour will cost me 11 (that includes tax) for a 16kg sack.

Paul

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #21 on: July 31, 2010, 03:00:57 PM »
Flour prices can vary quite a bit Paul depending on part of the country and brand.  I have very little experience with buying flour.  Of course bulk costs less.  For a 50lb sack of the Sams Club HG flour I believe I paid around $16 US for it.  My memory is foggy though.  Maybe someone can chime in about how much they pay for the KA stuff. 

Paul I went out and got a new 12" stone from Sears.  I paid about $12 and made another $5 donation to the troops.  They got me last time too, only it was for poor kids or something like that.  The last stone I had fell off that glass table when it crashed so I had to go make another donation yesterday.  :-D

I had enough of your flour to make 1 more doughball.  I also made a 2nd doughball with my SC HG flour to compare the 2.    I should have kept everything the same but I didn't. 

I played around with a modified version of Scott's straight dough method by adding more flour upfront and mixing to a wet shag instead of a wet batter (so that would represent 85-90% of the flour).  I then autolyse it for 10min this time instead of 20min.   Then kneaded in more flour to get a drier feel than I had gotten 2 days earlier. 

I calculated the new HR and to my surprise it was a 67%!  Down from 76% and it wasn't hard to do.  Based on this I have a theory about how autolyse affects hydration.   

So with my SC HG flour I decided to use my old technique of adding in 75% of the dough and letting it sit for 20 min then adding in the rest slowly.  I calculated the HR of this ball and it was about a 77%.

Here are the pics of today's pies in the MBE.  WARNING!!  Paul you better get a towel and cover up your keyboard buddy.  :o   Get ready for some pizza p@rn.   >:D

Here's a shot of the new stone.  It's ok, I need to dial it in though.   Then the pie made with your flour.
« Last Edit: July 31, 2010, 03:02:55 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #22 on: July 31, 2010, 03:08:25 PM »
Here's a shot of the crumb for this pie as well.  I'll compare this one to the oven baked pie and then I'll post the SC HG flour pie I made today.

Hmmm 76% HR vs a 67% HR using the same flour.  Hmmm. can't say there was a huge difference.  The higher HR did have an airier crumb that's for sure, but this pie was also dang good.  I gobbled up most of this pie right away.  Had to remind myself I had another pizza coming.  I had also tried a new cheese on this pie that I liked very much so that might have something to do with it.

The crumb.  It was not as airy as the other but it was very moist and tender and still airy enough.  It was not doughy at all.  I loved it.  It's the first mid 60's HR crumb that I was impressed with.  It could have been the new modified straight dough technique that I used as well.  Dunno.  have to do more testing. 

I was also impress that the MBE produced much more leoparding compared to the oven bake despite using almost identical recipes (aside from the HR difference). 

Enjoy Paul.  Wish you could have share this pie with me.   :chef:
« Last Edit: July 31, 2010, 03:16:27 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #23 on: July 31, 2010, 03:14:32 PM »
Ok here's pie #2 made with Sam's club HG flour with my old dough technique.  HR was 77%, stretched and folds to trap big air bubbles.  Baked at around 680F for 4 mins or so.  Much loftier than the previous pie but had to be put bake in a hot oven with burner off and sit for a bit to dry out and crisp up the skin again. 

After fooling around too much with ultra high HR, i seriously think I need to come back down.  Now that I have the modified straight dough technique, I'll be testing out lower HR's of 65-70% and still try to achieve the big voids.  This should also allow me to get a great bake in the 3 to 3.5min realm and still get a nice crispy rim that won't go soft after sitting. 

Another thing to note between the 2 unbaked pies is that given the same amount of yeast and relatively same formula, Paul's manitoba flour proofed up more than the SC HG flour despite having a lower HR (meaning it had quite a bit more flour in the recipe compare to the SC HG ball).  ???  Scott or Peter, maybe you can explain this one?  Both had same amount of water, rehydrated ady, same room temp proof side by side.  I'm convinced that i would have gotten even a bigger rim spring had i let the SC HG ball proof up some more but the oven was warmed and I coudn't wait. 
« Last Edit: July 31, 2010, 03:19:57 PM by Jackie Tran »

brayshaw

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Re: Mystery flour Challenge
« Reply #24 on: August 02, 2010, 01:43:00 AM »
Chau, they are cracking looking pies! I wish I could have tried them too! Great job JT!