Author Topic: Chicago deep dish pan material?  (Read 3660 times)

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Offline garyd

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Chicago deep dish pan material?
« on: August 02, 2010, 01:47:57 AM »
What are the deep dish pans used a Uno's and Lou Malnati's made of? Aluminum or Steel or something else?


Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: Chicago deep dish pan material?
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2010, 02:05:10 AM »
i've seen and handled them in person and they appear to be made of a high temp coated heavy gauge steel.  the pans are the weight of an old made in USA skillet.  probably 1/8" plate steel, custom made since 1942 for uno.  possible the pans are 60 years old at the first few uno's

i spent hundreds of dollars out of pocket reverse engineering the uno crust to a T and found that popcorn butter was the secret.  the salt, the taste, the coconut oil.

also, the first two pizzas on this site were designed by me, but stolen ideas from me also.  http://bigbearpizza.net/
Hotdogs kill more people than sharks do, yearly.

Offline PizzaPolice

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Re: Chicago deep dish pan material?
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2010, 09:24:14 AM »
Quote
i've seen and handled them in person and they appear to be made of a high temp coated heavy gauge steel.  the pans are the weight of an old made in USA skillet.  probably 1/8" plate steel, custom made since 1942 for uno.  possible the pans are 60 years old at the first few uno's


Hmm...
Somewhere in the deep, dark files of years past, lurk a shot of an actual pan used @ Uno's.  I can't locate it.  If need be, I will take another picture.  They are straight sided uncoated steel.  Heavy gauge but NO WHERE near a skillet, ...Unless you buy them at the dollar store.  The pans are closer to the vintage, Made In USA 60 year old Fasano Pie Pans.  My kid worked there some years ago and liberated a pan and grabber with the permission of the manager.  The manage told him they buy them (Circa 2006) from Trimark ( http://www.trimarkusa.com/TriMark_products/equipment.html )

Offline loowaters

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Re: Chicago deep dish pan material?
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2010, 10:08:23 AM »
I would've guessed tin plate on steel for Uno's pans.  PP, sounds like you got some strong info there.

bbp, I'll go out on a limb here and tell you that while you may have found results that you like using popcorn butter, it's not what they're using at the original Pizzeria Uno, or Due's for that matter, in their dough formulation.  Bottom of the pan for cooking?  Maybe, but not in the dough.

Loo

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Offline FLAVORMAN

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Re: Chicago deep dish pan material?
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2010, 01:01:35 PM »
I am pretty confident Lou's at one time used unrefined coconut oil....I used it years ago and that was probably what popcorn butter was back then. It was yellow in color and could be the reason the crusts had the hint of yellow that people thought was corn meal..

Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: Chicago deep dish pan material?
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2010, 02:55:46 PM »
Hmm...
Somewhere in the deep, dark files of years past, lurk a shot of an actual pan used @ Uno's.  I can't locate it.  If need be, I will take another picture.  They are straight sided uncoated steel.  Heavy gauge but NO WHERE near a skillet, ...Unless you buy them at the dollar store.  The pans are closer to the vintage, Made In USA 60 year old Fasano Pie Pans.  My kid worked there some years ago and liberated a pan and grabber with the permission of the manager.  The manage told him they buy them (Circa 2006) from Trimark ( http://www.trimarkusa.com/TriMark_products/equipment.html )



not thick LIKE a skillet, but weighty like it.  by coated i mean... seasoned.  sorry.  it was laste when i typed that.
Hotdogs kill more people than sharks do, yearly.

Offline garyd

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Re: Chicago deep dish pan material?
« Reply #6 on: August 03, 2010, 01:50:48 AM »
I basically know the thickness from eating at several deep dish places but I am wanting to know the material. The kitchen and restaurant supply stores have aluminum cake and pizza pans but it doesn't seem right. It seems more like steel. So are they steel?

Offline loowaters

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Re: Chicago deep dish pan material?
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2010, 07:35:24 AM »
American Metalcraft has all their 8000 series pans available in standard weight aluminum, heavy weight aluminum, hard coat aluminum, and tin plate on steel.  http://www.amnow.com/Pizza-Trays/8000-Series-Pans/8000-Series-%E2%80%93-Straight-Sided-%E2%80%93-1-1-2-2-Deep

Any restaurant supply place can order these for you and probably save you shipping by just tacking your order on to a regular order of their own.

Loo
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Offline PizzaPolice

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Re: Chicago deep dish pan material?
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2010, 01:54:21 PM »
Hey Loo...

You got me thinking.  Maybe they are tinned.  If you look closely you'll see that hundreds if not thousands of deep dish pizza were cut in this pan.  So. . . I can't tell tin from taffy.
There is some type of stamped name on the reverse but I can't make it out.  BTW... A magnet readily sticks to it.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2010, 02:20:12 PM by PizzaPolice »

Offline vcb

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Re: Chicago deep dish pan material?
« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2010, 01:58:10 PM »
I basically know the thickness from eating at several deep dish places but I am wanting to know the material. The kitchen and restaurant supply stores have aluminum cake and pizza pans but it doesn't seem right. It seems more like steel. So are they steel?


You may be looking for either aluminized steel or the non-plated steel deep dish pans.

Aluminized steel is also known as 'tin-plated steel' because bakers used to use tin,
but tin melts at too low of a temp to use above 450 degrees, so they now use aluminum plated bakeware.

If you go to a restaurant supply shop, you might also find the regular non-plated steel deep dish pizza pans, many of which have been pre-treated with some oil or other curing/browning agent, which will need to be 'burned-in' or 'seasoned' before you bake with it. I recommend doing that in a well ventilated area, or outdoors in your bbq.
Search the forum for suggestions from others about 'seasoning' your pans for use.

Also, many recommend the aluminized steel pans that have an additional darkened non-stick coating (like Chicago Metallic's Professional Deep Dish Pan)

I have a few pan recommendations on my blog, if you're interested:
http://virtualcheeseburger.blogspot.com/2009/04/pizza-rant-2-deep-dish-pizza-conundrum.html

Also,
If you want the PSTK treated heavy gauge all-aluminum pans, Lloyd sells a few varieties.
http://www.lloydpans.com/C-1000024/Deep+Dish+Stacking
http://www.lloydpans.com/C-1000023/Deep+Dish+Nesting
« Last Edit: August 03, 2010, 02:06:53 PM by vcb »
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Offline seatactony

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Re: Chicago deep dish pan material?
« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2010, 06:25:12 PM »
Hi all,

In the market for some new pans and stumbled across this thread.

I've been using cured aluminum pans for years but have found that my seasoning of the pans has a very hard time sticking for long.  Also grew up eating Lou's/Gino's and always assumed that: (1) they used steel pans because they were sturdier and allowed cutting of the pizza in the pans (as illustrated by the photo above); and (2) curing of the pans might "stick" better to steel than alum.

Most of the recommendations on the site relate to anodized alum. pans.  I assume that one can't cut pizzas in these pans. 

A few questions: (1) any idea whether seasoning works better with steel than alum.?; (2) can you cut pie in an anodized alum. pan?; (3) are the "tinned" steel pans referenced above safe for cooking at high temps; and (4) any issues with cutting in these pans?

TIA!
« Last Edit: November 15, 2010, 06:45:09 PM by seatactony »

Offline BTB

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Re: Chicago deep dish pan material?
« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2010, 02:33:14 PM »
i spent hundreds of dollars out of pocket reverse engineering the uno crust to a T and found that popcorn butter was the secret. 
You do mean popcorn oil instead of butter don't you?  I'm not familiar with a popcorn butter product on the market.
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