Author Topic: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book  (Read 16406 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21590
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #360 on: November 05, 2010, 04:51:16 PM »
The second loaf from the first batch of dough I mixed yesterday of Country Bread was baked later on this morning.  This second loaf turned out better than my first loaf.  I can understand why everyone likes this bread now.  It is so moist in the middle and  crunchy on the outside.  I am going to make something else in the Tartine Bread book tonight.  

At least my poor baking equipment did okay in making this bread. I finally heard the “song of bread”.   ;D  My loaf doesn’t look as professional as other members, but it was good.  Picture of bread dough top and bottom, dough of loaf in regular basket with towel, loaf, slices, and how much this bread can be pushed together and spring back.

Thanks to everyone that has explored this Book.

Pictures below

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!


Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21590
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #361 on: November 05, 2010, 04:52:05 PM »
rest of pictures

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21590
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #362 on: November 05, 2010, 04:53:46 PM »
Norma,

No problem. I thought you might find those links useful.

Stuten is what my Great-Grandma always made for me. It's absolutely delicious and has a slightly sweet and tangy flavor. Spread some butter on a nice thick slice, slather with some jam or Nutella and you're in heaven.

Damn, I should make one myself  ;D



Mike,

I did find those links helpful!  :)  I think you should become a professional baker.   ;D

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Essen1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3277
  • Location: SF Bay Area
    • The Hobby Cook
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #363 on: November 05, 2010, 04:53:55 PM »
Norma,

That looks pretty darn good to me for a first try! Great job and keep at it. It only gets better.  :chef:
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21590
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #364 on: November 05, 2010, 04:56:28 PM »
Norma,

That looks pretty darn good to me for a first try! Great job and keep at it. It only gets better.  :chef:

Mike,

Thanks for the compliment.   :)  I will keep on trying.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Essen1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3277
  • Location: SF Bay Area
    • The Hobby Cook
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #365 on: November 05, 2010, 04:59:15 PM »
Mike,

I did find those links helpful!  :)  I think you should become a professional baker.   ;D

Norma

I'm far from becoming a Pro but the idea is lingering.

Here's a couple of pics of Stuten to give you a better idea. And the obligatory Nutella slice...  :chef:

Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21590
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #366 on: November 05, 2010, 05:08:08 PM »
I'm far from becoming a Pro but the idea is lingering.

Here's a couple of pics of Stuten to give you a better idea. And the obligatory Nutella slice...  :chef:



Mike,

Thanks for the pictures of the German Stuten.  It looks delicious!  That darn Nutella keeps coming up.  I have Nutella here at home.  Will post a picture of my bread with Nutella on.  You just made me eat another slice of bread.   :-D

Best of luck if you decide to become a bread baker.  :)

Pictures below

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline dellavecchia

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2628
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #367 on: November 05, 2010, 05:34:08 PM »
Excellent bread Norma! Addicting, isn't it?

John

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21590
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #368 on: November 05, 2010, 05:43:49 PM »
Excellent bread Norma! Addicting, isn't it?

John

John,

Thanks for the compliment.   :)  This bread was the best I have ever tasted.  I am sure it will be addicting.  :-D I am glad other members have forged the way for me.  I never made that much bread before, so I didn't know what to expect from this high hydration dough for the bread.  It sure was sticky.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21590
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #369 on: November 05, 2010, 09:32:38 PM »
Tonight I tried the recipes on page 197 for the Aioli and Rouille.  In the Tartine Bread book it says that the word Aioli derives from two Spanish words meaning literally “garlic oil”.  Both of these recipes are made with a mortar and pestle.  Both of these recipes were fantastic in my opinion.  The pictures below show what ingredients I used and how the emulsion looks at two times.  I only ate both of these recipes with cheesy sausage, but I can imagine how tasty these would be with other foods.

I only tried three recipes from this book and I am already in love with this book.  I think this book will take me to new levels in cooking and baking.  :)

Pictures below

Norma
« Last Edit: November 05, 2010, 10:25:54 PM by norma427 »
Always working and looking for new information!


Offline Essen1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3277
  • Location: SF Bay Area
    • The Hobby Cook
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #370 on: November 05, 2010, 10:28:16 PM »
Norma,

Nice work!

You can also use the aioli as a spread for sandwiches, too. With roasted Turkey, for example, or roast beef.

Dammit, I'm slobbering over my keyboard here just thinking about it.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21590
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #371 on: November 05, 2010, 10:33:57 PM »
Norma,

Nice work!

You can also use the aioli as a spread for sandwiches, too. With roasted Turkey, for example, or roast beef.

Dammit, I'm slobbering over my keyboard here just thinking about it.

Mike,

I never tasted aioli before.  It had the best taste in my opinion.  I still taste the slight taste of garlic and lemon used in this recipe. I was surprised how the egg yolk came together in the emulsion. I can imagine how good that aioli would be on turkey or roast beef sandwiches.  :-D  I think I have to get another piece of bread.  :-D   Even the bread I made yesterday still has a good taste, even if it wasn't airy.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

parallei

  • Guest
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #372 on: November 05, 2010, 10:42:16 PM »
Here's my first attempt at the Tartine Rustic Bread.  I've been doing the no-knead every now and again but this stretch and fold method is something new to me.  I found the dough was easy to work with.  The rise times were a bit shorter here at 5280 feet.  I used my Ishica starter.  On the tang-o-meter, if San Fran Sourdough is a 10, I'd give this about a 5.  Next time I might bake it another 5 min or so.  That combo cooker is great!  Nice oven spring.

I used 90% AP/10% WW and scaled the recipe back for one loaf  plus 300g for a pizza tomarrow night.

Offline Essen1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3277
  • Location: SF Bay Area
    • The Hobby Cook
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #373 on: November 05, 2010, 11:06:16 PM »
Parallei,

How long was your fermentation time?

Btw, that plate and bread would go nicely with Norma's Aioli!  ;D
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

parallei

  • Guest
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #374 on: November 05, 2010, 11:19:54 PM »
Mike,

The levain went overnight, like the recipe.  The bulk about 2.5 hours and the final rise also about 2.5 hours.  I was expecting 3 to 4 hours each as per the recipe.

Paul


I should note that the bulk was done at 82 deg.  I guess that might have had something to do with it.....
« Last Edit: November 05, 2010, 11:36:06 PM by parallei »

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21590
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #375 on: November 06, 2010, 12:24:13 AM »
I took a short video of how moist this Tartine Country Bread is.  The Country Bread has been in a plastic bag now, so the crust isn’t hard like it was, when it was first baked.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLC6vBw4G0U" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLC6vBw4G0U</a>


Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21590
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #376 on: November 06, 2010, 08:24:24 AM »
This is a video posted on You Tube a few days ago of someone with a loaf of Tartine Country bread from the Tartine Bakery.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVfG8Y7e6J4" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVfG8Y7e6J4</a>


Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Jackie Tran

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6977
  • Location: Albuquerque NM
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #377 on: November 06, 2010, 08:37:27 AM »
Wow, the bread looks out of this world!   That gal is HIGH though, high on Tartine bread.   :-D

Thanks for posting the video Norma.  I'm glad you got the book.

Chau

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21590
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #378 on: November 06, 2010, 09:28:48 AM »
Wow, the bread looks out of this world!   That gal is HIGH though, high on Tartine bread.   :-D

Thanks for posting the video Norma.  I'm glad you got the book.

Chau


Chau,

I also liked seeing how the Country Bread from Tartine's looked.  I am glad other members have posted about this book.  I really like it.  :)

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Essen1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3277
  • Location: SF Bay Area
    • The Hobby Cook
Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #379 on: November 06, 2010, 02:29:41 PM »
Mike,

The levain went overnight, like the recipe.  The bulk about 2.5 hours and the final rise also about 2.5 hours.  I was expecting 3 to 4 hours each as per the recipe.

Paul


I should note that the bulk was done at 82 deg.  I guess that might have had something to do with it.....

Paul,

I do the exact opposite. I'd ferment the bulk in the fridge overnight and the individual loaves, the final rise, at a lower room temp because it's getting colder here, probably somewhere around 65-70° and with an extended rise time, 3-4 hrs.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/


 

pizzapan