Author Topic: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book  (Read 16211 times)

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Offline Essen1

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #700 on: February 19, 2011, 12:00:31 AM »

I'm glad you implied there are 4 folds per set though, as the martha stewart page says "do this 2 or 3 times" and I wasn't sure what it meant. 4 folds is what I usually do and definitely seems to work best (treat the dough as having 4 sides and fold each once).


Ah yes,...good ol' Martha. She's the June Cleaver of insider trading.  ;)

Anyway, that's a totally different subject. MS doesn't know jack-%$# about this particular bread or how it's made. I'm surprised Chad Robertson actually gave her permission to use the recipe.

Chad recommends four complete stretch & folds every 30 mins with an hour break before the last one, which brings the number to 16 total, in his book. You can get it at Amazon for about 23 bucks.
Mike

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Offline hotsawce

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #701 on: February 19, 2011, 03:21:15 AM »
Norma,

You always make the recipes I am eyeballing. The homemade Nutalla looks delicious!

Online norma427

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #702 on: February 19, 2011, 07:48:54 AM »
Norma,

You always make the recipes I am eyeballing. The homemade Nutalla looks delicious!

hotsawce,

Thanks for saying the Nutella looks delicious.   :)  Different people have tasted it and really liked it.  I used it on one pizza at market and another last evening for a S'more pizza in Steve's (Ev) WFO. The pizza at market also used your cultured butter dotted around the rim. That crust tasted good with your cultured butter on the rim. I still haven't had time to bake a Tartine Bread to try it on.  ::)

Norma
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Pizza01

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #703 on: February 19, 2011, 08:08:22 AM »
norma could you pleace post the picture of the pizza with the nutalla and butter that you made?

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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #705 on: February 21, 2011, 08:27:17 AM »
I'd like to continue discussing here something I brought up in another thread because I think it is important about Tartine bread. Robertson advises handling the dough as little as possible and treating it as gently as possible when forming the loaves. As I have mentioned up-thread, I had no problem getting great results even when being pretty rough on the dough. But I now attribute that roughness more to clumsiness from being unfamiliar with the technique. After so many doughs, it is now becoming second nature and I can go through the forming steps with much more ease and control. I would guess I'm handling it now half as much as I was before. The resulting loaves are so much lighter.

It is time to make a little video of what I'm talking about. When I made bread yesterday, I only used half of the dough, putting the other half in the fridge. I probably won't be baking it till Wednesday. Not sure how it will fare after a few days in the cold, but I'll try to post a video of the way I have forming the loaves this week.

    

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #706 on: February 21, 2011, 09:11:54 PM »
I've been critical of some of the book's recipes for leftover bread in which the goodness of the Tartine bread is obscured. Well, the recipe for breadcrumbs is NOT one of those, especially when you use slices with plenty of deeply flavorful crust. Today I made a modified bucatini ammuddicata with toasted and then fried Tartine bread crumbs. So simple and so delicious. The crumbs were the star of the dish.




Offline Ronzo

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #707 on: February 21, 2011, 11:57:42 PM »
I've been critical of some of the book's recipes for leftover bread in which the goodness of the Tartine bread is obscured. Well, the recipe for breadcrumbs is NOT one of those, especially when you use slices with plenty of deeply flavorful crust.
Mmmmm... that sounds awesome.
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Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #708 on: February 22, 2011, 09:58:52 AM »
Today I made a modified bucatini ammuddicata with toasted and then fried Tartine bread crumbs. So simple and so delicious. The crumbs were the star of the dish.

Bill - Half a loaf each week goes to bread crumbs. Cotolette di pollo is one of my all time favorites for them.

John

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #709 on: February 22, 2011, 10:43:20 AM »
Very nice, John. Tartine crumbs rule! 


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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #710 on: February 22, 2011, 01:56:10 PM »
i bet its very tasty john. also great photo.

Offline Ronzo

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #711 on: February 22, 2011, 06:00:56 PM »
Bill - Half a loaf each week goes to bread crumbs. Cotolette di pollo is one of my all time favorites for them.

John
HOLY CR*P THAT LOOKS GOOD!!! My mouth is gushing...
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Offline artellan

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #712 on: February 23, 2011, 01:02:51 AM »
Okay, I can finally report on how my first batch of Tartine country bread turned out!
First off, I should note the deviations from the recipe:

1. I don't have the book yet (I'll be getting it in about 6 weeks for my birthday so I must wait  :( ), so I used the recipe from marthastewart.com

2. Due to scheduling I mixed the dough in the evening. So while bulk fermentation & folding times were per the recipe, I needed to extend/retard the proofing stage. After shaping the 4 loaves and placing them all in baskets to proof, I immediately brought them to my basement which was around 65F. I wasn't sure how they would develop at that temperature, so I checked them at around 4:30am (4.5 hours after going to bed) and they seemed like the were almost ready to bake, so I transferred them to my garage which was around 25F (there wasn't room in the fridge for all those baskets). Because 25F is below freezing, I put a blanket over them, and nestled between the baskets I placed a thermometer so I could track the temp they were really experiencing under the blanket.

3. My shaping techniques were not from the book. For the round loaf I used the usual boule shaping method which I originally learned from sourdough.com but is pretty much the same in Hamelman's Bread. The others were batards and I used Gerard Rubaud's method that I learned from here: http://www.farine-mc.com/2010/01/batardbaguette-shaping-gerards-method.html  (I tried a few other methods and I usually get much better results with the Rubaud method)

4. I baked the first two loaves in closed vessels -- a large roasting pan with lid, and a round casserole dish. The roasting pan is lightweight so there's no way it has the thermal retention of cast iron, but after the casserole dish it was the best I had!
The final two loaves I baked my normal method for sourdough -- on a pizza stone with steam added via pouring boiling water onto a separate "steam pan" filled with rocks.

By the time I got them in the oven I think the loaves were slightly overproofed, although not terribly so. I found scoring difficult inside of the dish & pan, because it was hard to get the knife angle the way I like it. Still, the "self-steaming" provided by baking in closed vessels was pretty cool. The round loaf in the casserole dish had the best oven spring.

With the final two loaves I had some trouble loading them onto the baking stone. It was my fault because I was so used to my regular 65% hydration "norwich sourdough", I forgot to expect these to have a bit more give to them, and they spread out a bit as I was trying to load them. For a minute part of both loaves was hanging off the edge of the stone, but I used a wooden spatula to pull them back on board.

Coming out of the oven, the crusts looked awesome, just what the recipe seemed to be aiming for. When I cut into the first loaf -- the one baked in the roasting pan -- I was very happy with the crumb. (Note this is the only one I've cut into so far; we went out of town so the other ones are now in the freezer.)

The flavour was delicious, similar to my regular "norwich sourdough" but with a somewhat moister and lighter crumb, and a bigger difference between crust and crumb. (Which I love, but the kids don't, they like softer crusts.)

Conclusion: a fantastic sourdough recipe which I will definitely try again. I'm really happy with my results on the first try and I'd love to improve on them (mostly to get more oven spring and better 'opening' of slashes). Also it would be great to experiment with using some rye in the mix, like 5% WW 5% rye, or even trying kamut.


Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #713 on: February 23, 2011, 07:39:46 AM »
Nice post and beautiful loaves Artellan.  Fantastic results!

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #714 on: February 23, 2011, 08:29:39 AM »
Thanks so much for your detailed post, and the link to the batard shaping. Your crumb is perfection - very masterful. What flour did you use?

John

Online norma427

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #715 on: February 23, 2011, 09:18:02 AM »
artellan,

Your breads look fantastic!  :)  Thanks for you helpful post in what you did and the link. 

Norma
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Offline artellan

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #716 on: February 23, 2011, 04:44:10 PM »
Thanks everyone!

Believe it or not, the white flour I used was plain old No Name Unbleached All-Purpose (about $7 for 25 lbs!). For the whole wheat portion I used mostly organic stone-ground Red Fife flour, as I had some sitting around and wanted to use it up, with the remainder being No Name Whole Wheat.

The "No Name" flours are available at Loblaws/Superstore chain in Canada, and the Red Fife at Bulk Barn. I do intend on one day graduating to a better AP flour, hopefully a good locally and freshly milled source, but for now the No Name is giving good results and the price is right!

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #717 on: February 23, 2011, 05:25:30 PM »
Here is a little video showing how I form Tartine loaves. Of interest might be the section around 1:52 where I create the surface tension needed to support free-form baking. Also, this batch rested after fermenting in the fridge for 3 days. Not the prettiest loaf I have baked lately; for example, the one from a few days ago from the same batch of dough exhibited greater spring. But this one was as delicious.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fqry9EAtXpI" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fqry9EAtXpI</a>







Offline StrayBullet

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #718 on: February 23, 2011, 05:38:28 PM »
I LOVED the ending, what a score!!!

Thanks for taking the time to do that, really helped :)

Mark

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Re: Rustic Country Bread from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #719 on: February 23, 2011, 09:12:35 PM »
i have waited for this video.
thank you very much for posting it like mark said it helps a lot.
bill your youtube chanell is fantastic i am seeing all the video you have uploaded the opra punch killed me :-D.
good job :chef:.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2011, 09:43:20 PM by msheetrit »