Author Topic: Soapstone + High Temperatures = Burned Pizza  (Read 4001 times)

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Offline ddolinoy

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Soapstone + High Temperatures = Burned Pizza
« on: December 16, 2010, 06:54:08 PM »
I'm trying to make a NY style pizza with the big rim full of bubbles.  I've read in this forum that that requires high temperatures (800F+) and a quick cook time (4-5 minutes).  I preheated my 1 1/4 inch soapstone to 730F (measured with an infrared thermometer) by putting it on the bottom of my oven.  I cooked it about 3 1/2 minutes.  I opened the door and the pizza was stuck to the soapstone.  After using a metal spatula to scrape the pizza off, I saw that the bottom was completely black and inedible.  The top actually looked good.  I set off all the fire alarms in my house.  My son told me that he smelled smoke a few seconds after I put the pizza in the oven.  I even heard crackling sounds as soon as I put it in.  I thought that a piece of cheese fell off the pizza so I didn't worry about it.
I've made many good pizzas with the soapstone placed higher in the oven at 500F.  What am I missing here?
Dave


Offline jever4321

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Re: Soapstone + High Temperatures = Burned Pizza
« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2010, 07:59:39 PM »
I'm trying to make a NY style pizza with the big rim full of bubbles.  I've read in this forum that that requires high temperatures (800F+) and a quick cook time (4-5 minutes).  I preheated my 1 1/4 inch soapstone to 730F (measured with an infrared thermometer) by putting it on the bottom of my oven.  I cooked it about 3 1/2 minutes.  I opened the door and the pizza was stuck to the soapstone.  After using a metal spatula to scrape the pizza off, I saw that the bottom was completely black and inedible.  The top actually looked good.  I set off all the fire alarms in my house.  My son told me that he smelled smoke a few seconds after I put the pizza in the oven.  I even heard crackling sounds as soon as I put it in.  I thought that a piece of cheese fell off the pizza so I didn't worry about it.
I've made many good pizzas with the soapstone placed higher in the oven at 500F.  What am I missing here?
Dave
Hi Dave,
In my oven, at 550 degrees my pies take about 5 minutes. I'm cooking in 1-1/4" soap stone. I don't think you need such high floor temp. Just my opinion though.
-Jay

Offline chickenparm

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Re: Soapstone + High Temperatures = Burned Pizza
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2010, 09:06:57 PM »
Dave,
800+ degrees would be Neapolitan style I would believe...that would require about 2 minutes or less to cook!

Ny style is easily cooked around 475-550 F,depending on the oven.Times can be from 5-8 minutes.I preheat the stone and oven to 550 but then I turn it down to 475 by the time I cook the pizza.Its mainly to not burn the cheese.

If you want,here is a link to some of my pics I was experimenting with dough balls I bought.I use a cheap stone and keep the temps under 500 F in my elec oven..I made super thin,thin NY style and Huge rim style pizza that you can see on that link.The huge rim pizza was done on purpose,to see if I could and I was able to.
http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=2106362&id=1220593903&l=34a58b1567
-Bill

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Soapstone + High Temperatures = Burned Pizza
« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2010, 10:48:47 PM »
If I put raw dough on my floor at 730 it is charcoal in 5 minutes.

Offline ddolinoy

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Re: Soapstone + High Temperatures = Burned Pizza
« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2010, 10:19:51 AM »
Chickenparm,
Thanks for the advice.  I think I got Neapolitan mixed up with NY style.  I thought I had to use high temperatures to get the big rims you illustrated in your pictures.  Didn't I read somewhere that high water content and high temperatures contribute to high spring?  However, you said that you were able to get the results I'm looking for with around 500F.
Tscarborough,
The only difference between my pizza and charcoal is that charcoal doesn't smoke that much!  The lower temperature would certainly solve my charcoal problem!  I don't like to have to open the windows in my house to let the smoke out when it is 25F outside.
Jever4321,
You are confirming what everyone else is saying.
Dave

Offline jerrym

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Re: Soapstone + High Temperatures = Burned Pizza
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2010, 10:10:07 AM »
Dave,

i've just had similar experience albeit at 500/550 temp link: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12351.msg121216.html#msg121216

i think i had effectively covered over the main heat source and the rest of the oven chamber had become too cool to cook the top of the pizza.

Offline ddolinoy

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Re: Soapstone + High Temperatures = Burned Pizza
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2010, 01:59:54 PM »
jerrym,
I'm in complete agreement with you.  My oven only goes to 550F.  However, if you put your stone on the bottom of the oven, just above the burner, your stone can reach much higher temperatures.  I used my infrared thermometer and discovered it was 730F.  Now that I know that these temperatures are only used with Neapolitan pizzas, I'm not going to do that anymore.  I put my soapstone at about 4 inches from the top of my oven and got much better results.  Next, I'm going to try a little lower and see what changes.
Dave

Offline chickenparm

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Re: Soapstone + High Temperatures = Burned Pizza
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2010, 11:31:28 PM »
Dave,
I am still a newbie...maybe a novice now?
 :-[

That said,I want to clarify a bit more how I made such a large rimmed dough and spring from those HG dough balls I used.

I was careful to shape the dough when pressing it out into a circle since it had alot of gas or bubbles in it.

As they get pushed toward the rim,cooking it at 475-500,they explode and create a huge rim and spring.I'm sure they would have still rose nicely at lower temps as well.

That said,while I was glad to achieve it,I'm not 100% sure if it is the same type of spring that other makes with wetter doughs and/or high temps.Some of those folks doughs,they just shape them out,insert into very hot oven and the rim explodes!The dough rim usually looks flat or very small yet blows up nicely.

I will let the others chime in on that one.
 ;D

-Bill

Offline jerrym

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Re: Soapstone + High Temperatures = Burned Pizza
« Reply #8 on: December 23, 2010, 05:15:03 AM »
However, if you put your stone on the bottom of the oven, just above the burner, your stone can reach much higher temperatures.  I used my infrared thermometer and discovered it was 730F. 

Dave,

appreciate the extra info - i don't have equipment to measure and suspected the temperature must have been well above what my oven thermometer was showing.

for info best position for my stone (quarry tiles 1 inch thick) is 2.5 inch above base of oven and 4.0 inch from top of oven. i won't be moving it again.