Author Topic: Pizza Raquel  (Read 196991 times)

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Offline November

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #620 on: October 29, 2008, 07:36:48 PM »
I do have another "thing" update to report. I have sought this thing for quite some time and now I have it. It is the Princess International MR-148. That's right the MR-148 not the MR-138. What is the difference?

Five precious liters of interior space. Photographs are below of my new pride and joy.

It's about time.  That is really good news.


Offline widespreadpizza

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #621 on: October 29, 2008, 08:55:30 PM »
Probably a good idea to keep the old peels PFT,  you never know when you are gonna wanna change it up a bit.  Just thinking about changing it up after I posted and the mention of the wood peel made me think and realize that I had drastically oversized peel in my possession.  So I took it down from its display rack.  Then I traced a 16 inch screen onto it and proceeded to cut it to a real nice 48 inch long by 16 inch peel.  Just took my first pie out of the oven that I made with it.  It unloaded very nicely.  I will be using this everytime I get the large pie itch or need to feed a lot of people fast.  On the wood peel note,  I am sure that the popularity of the metal peel in this country has a lot to do with state food code.  We all know though that nothing is going to live through the heat the pizza is destined to endure.  -Marc

Offline ray

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #622 on: November 02, 2008, 06:21:56 AM »
pft,

I'm still here and watching!

Glad to see that you are continuing your trek. Your MR-148 uses Peltier plates, and I had assembled (and I mean that in the loosest sense of the word!) a lesser-performing facsimile a few months ago. I still need to put a thermostat in it (er, among other things) but I can play around with insulation and get it to maintain an anticipated temperature.

The Peltier plate is sandwiched between the 2 heat sinks and powered by the power supply on the right. I believe it's a 60 watt plate (as I remember). Just as an illustration, I stacked a few plates on the left. There's also a boxer fan suspended inside, by the small skewers that you can barely see on the right.

Anyway, good to see progress being made with Pizza Raquel! I've reached my parenthesis limit here (for this post), so...

Cheers,

Ray

 ;)

Offline pftaylor

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Pizza Raquel
« Reply #623 on: November 02, 2008, 07:48:50 AM »
Ray,
I am really impressed by your use of the parenthetical (parenthetically speaking of course) and your keen sense of pizza innovation. Good old fashioned American ingenuity from what I can tell. To others it might appear to be the twisted efforts of a mad scientist. Come to think of it…Ha-Ha!

Last night I had an opportunity to try out my new things and gauge their impact on effectiveness and I can report complete satisfaction across the board:

- The My Weigh 7001DX performed admirably and as intended. I really appreciated the adjustable angled display. Wasn’t sure it would be useful but on the first rattle out of the box it added value by minimizing glare from overhead. Bonus marks for this little feature.

- The loading peel from GI Metal (without the perforations) performed as intended. Couldn’t really notice a deleterious increase in flour residue upon loading a pie into the Raquel Oven. Could be I don’t use a lot of bench flour anymore. Could also be that I was never coordinated enough to use the perforated peel despite my years of being an elite athlete. Take your pick.

- The ten inch spinning peel was a delight to use for two reasons. First, its elongated handle meant I didn’t have to douse my arms in pool water to counter the Raquel Oven’s formidable heat wave. I stood a comfortable distance away from Raquel’s mouth and spun pies all night with little difficulty. Second, the bigger head allowed a bigger diameter pie which suits my eye just fine.

Currently, the Raquel dough optimizes within the following parameters:
- 1,650g Flour. 50/50 blend of Caputo (or San Felice) Pizzeria and King Arthur Special. Future experiments will consider Caputo Red (on order). The tipping point with Raquel’s wafer thin crisp crust is right about at 50/50. More Caputo or San Felice than 50% and the crust is too soft. More Special than 50% and the crust is too crispy, hard, and crunchy.
- 1L Smart water
- 50g Sea salt finely cut
- 45g Varasano starter (Maybe its me but the Camaldoli and the Ischia starters produce significantly less flavor and I don’t seem to care for the crumb structure as much either)
- 22 hour temperature controlled rise between 64 and 72 degrees
- Balls cut four or more hours before use
- Bake time between 45 seconds to 1.5 minutes with 1 minute being optimum

Photographs from last night’s Chef’s Walk are attached. Unsolicited comments from guests last night included a new one which bears mentioning;

“We can’t stop eating your pizza. We know we’ve overeaten by any reasonable measure, yet we don’t feel bloated, sleepy, or overstuffed. Why is that?”

That one rang my bell since I’ve designed the Raquel pizza experience to accomplish exactly that goal. Validates why I’m doing all this stuff…
Pizza Raquel is Simply Everything You’d Want.
www.wood-firedpizza.com

Offline JimmyMak

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #624 on: November 02, 2008, 08:03:02 AM »
It doesn't get any better than that. I agree with the starters , I  do not have varasanos starter  but I use the others in making cibatta & like the results when used with IDY. The starter gives the flavor. I don't believe the starters have enough ooph to raise the bread . What kind of pizza was the last one.

Offline Pizza Rustica

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #625 on: November 03, 2008, 09:52:03 PM »
PFT,

I cannot begin to tell you how much I have learned from and enjoyed your posts. I have devoured your posts as well as the hard work and discoveries you've made along the way.

If I may indulge in a few questions? I am having trouble with my room temp rise. I don't have the mr-138/148 or equivalent temp controls and have been doing room temp rises with the RT rise in the mid to high 70 degree range. My rise after 12-15 hours seems to have at least doubled and tends to result in flat dough balls. I am using your Raquel formula, but without the KASL as I don't have any yet. After balling and rising for 4-6 hours the balls tend to come out somewhat flat and a hour or so into the bake process the remaining balls are extremely flat. I assume its over fermented, but in reading the posts everyone seems to use the generic rise times of 12-15 hours or more without a lot of problems. Questions, if you please. Do you believe I am over proofing the dough? If so suggestions? Do you knead and punch down after your rise? if so how long typically do you knead the dough and what is your technique for kneading prior to balling? I haven't been kneading after the RT rise. In fact I have been trying to not disturb the dough. In retrospect, I understand that the kneading process actually gives the dough new life with food so I would assume this is an important step I have not been employing. I assume your 22 hour rise includes the balling phase, if so what is your base period for the rise? What oven temp have you found to work best with the Raquel formula? Sorry for the long post of questions, but any help from the master would be greatly appreciated.
Russ

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #626 on: November 03, 2008, 10:43:14 PM »
Russ,

I, too, await with interest for pftaylor's response to your questions. However, in the meantime, you may want to take a look at a recent thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7225.msg62332.html#msg62332 in which I described the results of significant experiments I have conducted to make a long, room-temperature fermented dough, without benefit of a ThermoKool or equivalent unit, even though I have a ThermoKool unit.

Peter

Offline pftaylor

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Pizza Raquel
« Reply #627 on: November 04, 2008, 07:00:55 AM »
JimmyMak,
The last pizza is aptly named Tampa Verde. It features a sourdough crust, imported Prosciutto, honey ham, fresh mozzarella, Sini Fulvi Romano, organic basil, and fresh organic baby arugula topped with grated Regiano Parmesano. 

Pete-zza,
Thanks for assisting. No telling how long my response might have taken with my travel schedule. Fortunately I have a moment this morning.
 
Pizza Rustica,
We have all sat where you’re sitting right now wondering what we’ve done wrong. Fact is pizza is the ultimate expression and culmination of one’s prior efforts. With pizza, one gets exactly what they deserve.

A pizza may appear opaque to the untrained eye. But it is a veritable mirror which provides a pristine view reflecting the precise impact of what one’s efforts were leading up to the final moment of truth – the bake. Err at any of the prior steps and the result can be anything from a minor issue to catastrophic failure.

If only we knew how to look in the mirror. I have spent a lifetime peering into the pizza mirror of truth wondering how such a seemingly simple concoction can be so elusive. Learning to make killer pizza consistently is no small triumph as a consequence.

My baseline suggestion would be to initially focus on the 20% (of the effort) which delivers the 80% (of the results). Rip and replace anything not necessary or proven to be helpful. Keeping it as simple as possible as you go. Then, and only then, once robust results become routine and you’re certain you’ve dialed in your intended results, should you get jiggy with expanding your base and extending your reach into the pizza hinterland.

Let’s see if I can help you from what you’ve posted. Remember that making changes are notoriously difficult to measure when making more than one at a time so proceed prudently. I view this process as being painstakingly iterative.

My suspicions center squarely on the following areas:
- Rise temperature is too high. A room temperature rise should be somewhere between 64F to 72F. Too much heat equals too much yeast activity. The concept of a room temperature rise is akin to a marathon instead of a sprint. The goal is a steady pace of fermentation not a big bang.   
   
- Too much yeast for the rise temperature. If dough doubles and then goes flat it sounds to me like the yeast are out of food. What does your finished crust look like?

- Not enough salt relative to rise time, amount of yeast, and rise temperature

- Rise period too long relative to rise temperature.

The macrodynamics governing whats going on here are; time, temperature, yeast, and salt (flour and hydration are of minor importance relative to the big four above). And they are completely controllable by you. But only if you treat them as a system of interactions.

In order to do so, one needs to properly understand the relationship of one to another. The interaction of time, temperature, yeast, and salt is what you are struggling with. It is what perplexes every aspiring pizza crafter at one point or another.

I will end my response here and await your reply. Kindly analyze your dough management and preparation process in light of the above and ask yourself a couple of high-level questions:

- What might I have too much of?
- What might I not have enough of?

Make a pizza or two and report back with photographs so we can all view into your mirror and learn to make better pizza along with you. 
« Last Edit: November 04, 2008, 07:17:06 AM by pftaylor »
Pizza Raquel is Simply Everything You’d Want.
www.wood-firedpizza.com

Offline Pizza Rustica

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #628 on: November 05, 2008, 01:52:46 AM »
Pete-zza,

I did read your long fermentation attempt and concur that what you experienced I am likewise experiencing. I particularly noticed that you re-kneaded and punched down the dough whenever you felt the dough became unmanageable and exhausted. This seemingly simple step is one that I have avoided for fear of adversely affecting the dough. But what I think you found was that it was required due to the long fermentation and the exhaustion of the food supply for the yeast. It seems from your experience to have allowed your dough a much longer and more successful lifespan ( is it simply the dough fountain of youth I've been searching for?) I await your input. As always I and countless others greatly appreciate your insight and efforts to help us more dough challenged bodies.

PFT
As you suggest it truly is a journey and I have enjoyed my ride along the way learning, experimenting and most joyfully eating the result. Our backyard was a project that came in way over budget and took way too long, but I am consoled everytime I fire the oven and crack a cold beer.

My formula is simply yours:
Flour 1650G San Felice/sometimes 100%; last version 30% San Felice/70% AP flour (pics are of 100% San Felice)
Water 60-63% range
Sea Salt 45G
Ischia 50g

Thanks to an obliging wife and the fact that smoke started coming out of our lowly kitchen aid I was both determined and fortunate to acquire a Santos fork mixer. It does wonders for my manhood. Its like looking under the hood of a early 70's muscle car knowing that tremendous potential sits waiting for someone to step on the throttle and take it where it really wants to go.

In thinking thru your post, it seems almost too obvious that the answer is simply overfermentation, but I conclude that it probably is so. I am unskilled enough to recognize when to stop the 1st rise based upon the growth of the dough to less than/more than doubling or somewhere thereabout. As I mentioned I have been doing RT rise and here in Calif. until last week it has been rather warm thus the 75 degree +  room temp rises. I have tried putting the dough in our 55 degree wine cooler, but it seemed like after 15 hours there was virtually no rise. So I'm sure there is a point of finding the right balance but again some helpful tips would be appreciated. Namely how to tell when the 1st rise is sufficient; method and duration of 2nd kneading; It seems to take me only 1-2 minutes of kneading and then I begin to lose the beautiful texture of the dough and it turns rough and begins to show some edges to it. I have attached several pics for consideration from a couple different attempts. You will notice the somewhat flatness of the dough balls in the pics. One pic has two types of dough balls 100% San Felice and the 30/70 SF/AP. The others are 100% SF.

I thank you for your assistance and guidance.

Additionally, I was able to stop by Pizzeria Mozza in L.A. and will be posting several pics from my experience. You will notice in the Mozza pics the coloration of the crust. As has been mentioned here before it is quite crunchy almost too much so, but nevertheless I and my boys enjoyed it thoroughly.
Russ

Offline pftaylor

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Pizza Raquel
« Reply #629 on: November 05, 2008, 08:29:54 AM »
Pizza Rustica,
Thanks for the rapid response. Let’s see if I can help based on what we now know from the enhanced detail of your dough management process and photographs provided. Your pizza looks very well done I might add.

Let’s tackle your situation as if it were mine here in Tampa. We’ll get to the end and see how we did. From the details in your post, let’s say I wanted to make a batch of dough and I was faced with the facts you provided (and some I assumed):
- Desirous of a room temperature rise at an average of 75F
- 50g of fully activated starter without additional IDY/ADY added as a booster
- 1650g Flour
- 1L purified water (equals a 60.6% hydration depending on starter consistency)
- 45g sea salt
- Santos fork mixer
- Wood-fired oven at 800F plus

Based on the above facts I would employ the latest Pizza Raquel dough management process (which you should already have) and proceed down one of two main paths:
- Shortened rise (less flavor and less digestible) with no other changes
- Longer rise (more flavor and more digestible) with necessary changes

For a shortened rise, I would make the batch of dough according to the specifications above and adjust the bulk rise time to approximately eight hours. Then hand-knead until springy (using the punch & fold technique), cut and ball. Rest for four hours. Form skin, top with favorite toppings, and bake. Then just before I put the first bit in my mouth I would close my eyes, take a hearty bite and not try to stop my toes from twitching by just submitting to Raquel’s distortion field of pleasure.

For the longer rise (twenty-two hours or so) option, I would implement a couple of upfront small yet significant changes. First, I would cut back on the amount of starter (to about 35g) and/or increase the amount of salt slightly making sure to never go over 55g (55g is safe whereas 60g can lead to trouble in my experience). The initial bulk rise should be about sixteen to eighteen hours. Then hand-knead until springy, cut and ball. Rest for four to six hours. Form skin, top with favorite toppings, and bake. Then just before I put the first bit in my mouth I would close my eyes, take a hearty bite and not try and stop my eyes from rolling into the back of my head with pure unadulterated bliss. Just submit to the pizza and repeat until full.   

From an appearance standpoint, I would expect the dough balls not to rise much during the bulk period and hardly any at all during the second rise. I would expect to see some bubbling though. Also, I wouldn’t expect to see a ball shape either which is indicative of an overly tight dough. Your photographs show a relaxed dough mass which is emblematic of a room temperature, highly hydrated, naturally leavened dough prepared properly. My dough balls never actually look like balls anymore and yours shouldn’t either.

I trust the above is useful in your pizza making.
Pizza Raquel is Simply Everything You’d Want.
www.wood-firedpizza.com


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #630 on: November 05, 2008, 11:15:55 AM »
Pete-zza,

I did read your long fermentation attempt and concur that what you experienced I am likewise experiencing. I particularly noticed that you re-kneaded and punched down the dough whenever you felt the dough became unmanageable and exhausted. This seemingly simple step is one that I have avoided for fear of adversely affecting the dough. But what I think you found was that it was required due to the long fermentation and the exhaustion of the food supply for the yeast. It seems from your experience to have allowed your dough a much longer and more successful lifespan ( is it simply the dough fountain of youth I've been searching for?) I await your input. As always I and countless others greatly appreciate your insight and efforts to help us more dough challenged bodies.

Russ,

When I replied to your post, I assumed that you were making a commercial-yeast version of the Raquel dough. Sorry about that. However, I believe that the principles are the same with a naturally-leavened dough although perhaps not as pronounced. pftaylor made an important statement about fermentation temperature. Life would be made much easier for you if you used a unit like the ThermoKool (or equivalent) unit to control the fermentation temperature. Variations in room temperature require that you learn how to make dough like a skilled Neapolitan pizzaiolo would. If you did this for a living and made dough day after day, you would learn the unique behavior of your starter culture, how to reliably maintain it, and how to adapt the dough (along the lines discussed by pftaylor) to the varying environmental conditions. As a casual home pizza maker not on a regular pizza making schedule, it is harder to achieve success with a starter culture or preferment time after time and within the window of usabillty you have selected. I found that making a long (20-24 hour), room-temperature, commercially-leavened fermented dough was a real challenge--one of the toughest in my experience. To do likewise with a natural starter or preferment is even harder in my opinion if you are working with room temperatures. Unfortunately, for the volume of dough balls you have been making, you will not be able to use a unit like the ThermoKool unit to control the fermentation temperature. You will need a more commercial solution.

Like you, I once did some experiments with naturally-leavened doughs using a wine unit. I described some of my results at Reply 43 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2951.msg25809/topicseen.html#msg25809 and also in the related post at Reply 94 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,986.msg25807.html#msg25807. As noted in the above posts, I found my wine unit to be too cool and I had to take measures, as described, to help elevate the dough temperature during fermentation.

You might also be interested in a test that I conducted with two Neapolitan-style doughs in which one dough ball was fermented at room temperature and a second dough ball was fermented in my wine unit, as reported at Reply 96 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,986.msg25896/topicseen.html#msg25896. As it so happened, I used the dough fermented in the wine unit to conduct another experiment--specifically, to see if I could "kill" the dough by overfermentation. I described the results of that additional test at Reply 1 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5505.msg46570/topicseen.html#msg46570.

Peter
« Last Edit: November 05, 2008, 11:19:22 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Pizza Rustica

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #631 on: November 07, 2008, 12:16:01 AM »
Pete-zza,

I agree with your thoughts, the difficulty of trying to do room temp rises in varying conditions is difficult for a novice like me to say the least. The weather here has turned quite a bit colder in the last week or so and now I must make further adjustments to a process I am still trying to figure out. I will indeed explore the Thermakool unit as a possible resource in an effort to control the one variable only mother nature can control. The amount of balls made in the pics were for a large party for my son's birthday. I normally make smaller batches of dough. I will hopefully be firing the oven this weekend and will be able to report back on my results.

PFT,

Your insight is very helpful. Shorter rise, less flavor vs. longer rise, more flavor is an easy decision for me. In my quest for a great tasting pie the longer rise and better flavor will win every time. Your earlier comments about making small adjustments seem to make perfect sense. Set up the basic parameters and then fine tune by controlling and adjusting the variables. Like my kids baseball coach always says" good hitters always make adjustments". Reducing the amount of starter will hopefully offset the higher room temp rise. Excellent suggestion, I will try dropping down the starter level as suggested. I may tinker with the salt a bit, but so far I am happy with the taste levels of salt at present formula. Your comments about the form and nature of the state of my dough balls are reassuring.

If you don't mind my asking, you seem to have gone back to the Patsy/Varsanno starter. In recalling some of the older posts I thought Jeff V, yourself and others had concluded that Patsy's didn't use a starter and did not use an old dough/chef for their dough process. If so, how do you explain the taste levels both you and Jeff V seem to find so tantalizing? If their dough is made fresh daily (or the previous night) without starter and/or old dough what in the process and/or ingredients do you attribute to the excellent flavoring? Your thoughts and insight are appreciated.
Russ

Offline pftaylor

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Pizza Raquel
« Reply #632 on: November 07, 2008, 08:24:05 AM »
Pizza Rustica,
It was not a pleasurable experience to disprove varasano's belief about Patsy's having a starter. I had to uncover the unshakeable facts for myself before I could get past that point. But instances such as that have taught me the value of self discovery. In God we trust - all others bring evidence...

That said, the varasano starter (origin East Harlem/ATL/& Parts Unknown) I have is most assuredly superior in every way to the Ishcia or Camaldoli starters. Why? Well, for me, the varasano starter exhibits all the properties I could want in a starter:
- Fast to activate (one or two refreshment cycles is all that is necessary)
- Not finicky after being in the refrigerator for extended periods of time
- Imparts a pleasingly distinctive lactic acid taste to Pizza Raquel's Bubble Burst crust which melds well with mozzarella
- Superior puff
- Less susceptible to going acidic (sour) with long room temperature rises

I suppose if I kept the Italian starters more active they might perform better. But for the frequency I make pizza, they are problematic at best. If I had more time or the inclination to devote to them, perhaps I could get them to perform better. But I've gotten to the point where having to constantly worry about whether or not a given starter will activate or not is not something I want to do.

And it's not as if I didn't try to make them work either. I spent countless hours activating them only to determine the following (based on my pizza making experience):
- Between the two, the Camaldoli starter activates faster than the Ischia
- Both require two full days or more of refreshing every 4-6 hours to fully activate - which is not compatible with my travel schedule
- The Camaldoli produces a more lactic acid taste better suited for pizza but only for up to 18 hour rises (generally)
- The Ischia produces a more acidic acid taste better suited for bread
- The Ischia starter produces more puff and a more competent feeling dough

So in the final analysis, the varasano starter is better suited for my style of pizza making.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2008, 03:09:23 PM by pftaylor »
Pizza Raquel is Simply Everything You’d Want.
www.wood-firedpizza.com

Offline trosenberg

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #633 on: November 08, 2008, 05:29:40 AM »
Dear PF Taylor, I love your writing as well as your passion.  There is something comforting in knowing there are others who share one's obsession.  Now that you have me wanting to abandon the starters I have been nurturing for the past two years I guess I have to get some of Varasano's starter. 
Trosenberg

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #634 on: November 08, 2008, 08:24:06 AM »

- Between the two, the Camaldoli starter activates faster than the Ischia
- Both require two full days or more of refreshing every 4-6 hours to fully activate - which is not compatible with my travel schedule
- The Camaldoli produces a more lactic acid taste better suited for pizza but only for up to 18 hour rises (generally)
- The Ischia produces a more acidic acid taste better suited for bread
- The Ischia starter produces more puff and a more competent feeling dough


pftaylor,

I think frequency of use can make a big difference. I used to think Ischia was a very sour culture, so I didn't use it very often - maybe once every month. Then I started using it more frequently and the flavor profile changed dramatically. Now I use it once a week or more and the flavor is very mild. It only takes me a few hours to activate my most frequently used cultures with a single feeding. You need to take your cultures on the road with you. Just keep them in little 3 oz. bottles so TSA doesn't confiscate them.   ;D

Your biggest fan,
Bill/SFNM



Offline Pizza Rustica

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #635 on: November 10, 2008, 11:58:29 PM »
PFT,

Amazing. If the Varasano/NY starter did not originate from a dough with starter or old dough being added to the new dough, how did the subsequent capture of the dough/yeast achieve its amazing flavor characteristics from a fresh dough product with I believe baker's yeast? If we are able simply to assume we can capture a wild yeast in the essence of a great establishment using fresh dough, what possibilities does this open up?


Here's a few pics from the latest batch. Still working on the dough/RT rise. Unfortunately it has turned colder and thrown off my RT rise. I tried the rise in my garage at lower temp using the same 50g starter and found very little if any rise. After 15 hours bulk there was not any increase whatsoever. Dough was too cold and didn't want to warm up. As a result the crust had very little oven spring and much too dense. Obviously, back to your comments starter vs. temperature need to be adjusted. I really need to work on achieving a consistent rise for the dough. In regard to your useage of the Thermakool. Do all the dough balls fit into the unit? if so how are they packaged after balling?



Russ

Offline pftaylor

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #636 on: November 30, 2008, 07:26:27 AM »
Pizza Rustica,
Interesting question about culturing dough and forming a starter. My guess is he started from a chunk of Patsy's dough and the local yeast strain took over after a period of time.  Quite inadvertently perhaps.

Anyway, attached are a handful of photos depicting:
- A pepperoni pie,
- A mushroom/onion/ricotta/fresh mozzarella kitchen sink type pie
- A few slices showing Bubble Burst
- A classic Raquel

Happy holidays...
Pizza Raquel is Simply Everything You’d Want.
www.wood-firedpizza.com

Offline JConk007

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #637 on: November 30, 2008, 02:17:24 PM »
PFT ,
Just curious what type of oven you are using? Did not catch that info yet, 2 stone? Those  pies sure look great whatever it is. I have not experimented with a starter yet but getting some nice results. Moved indoors so I have a lot of things I want to try. Any recommendation for a starter? Frankie G? Sourdo.com? Is it hard to keep going?
thnaks

John
I Love to Flirt with Fire! www.flirtingwithfirepizza.com

Offline widespreadpizza

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #638 on: November 30, 2008, 04:25:04 PM »
PFT,  I know we are on similar paths right now... but heres my IDY room temp,  then retard version of raquel.  Couldn't help but show you,  I too have pretty much settled in on the 50% KA bread/special 50 % caputo.  This one came out about 5 minutes ago,  it's gone.....   touchdown patriots!  thats a real ugly start for pitts. -marc

Offline pftaylor

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Pizza Raquel
« Reply #639 on: December 02, 2008, 09:36:25 AM »
JConk007,
I am using a custom built ultra-low dome wood-fired oven which uniformly bakes a pie at whatever temperature I so choose. Want a perfectly baked pie in thirty seconds? No problem!

Sixty seconds? Sure - sign here ____________.

Two minute pie? Yeah, but why would you want to?

Seriously though, it was the result of an intense collaboration with an oven builder and refractory expert with more than twenty years experience. Cad/Cam optimized design, cost-no-object refractory and insulation materials, etc. In a nutshell it is, in my opinion, the ultimate pizza specific oven.

Regarding starters, I could write for a month and not cover all the pertinent details. My recommendation would be to try any of them out and see if the extra work is worth it for your style of pie. Care and feeding of a starter requires true effort – sort of like keeping a pet. 

Suffice to say that use of a wild yeast starter incorporated into a naturally leavened room temperature dough management process and baked in a wood-fired oven is my definition of the optimal process for producing stupendous pizza.

Hey widespreadpizza,
Your pies look delicious and vaguely familiar. Keep up the good work.
Pizza Raquel is Simply Everything You’d Want.
www.wood-firedpizza.com