Author Topic: Pizza dough too cold to easily stretch?  (Read 3975 times)

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Offline Jackie_Treehorn

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Pizza dough too cold to easily stretch?
« on: January 02, 2011, 03:59:57 PM »
Hey gang, I'm having some problems with my dough.

It's too hard to stretch.  I let me dough rise in the fridge over night and take it out about two hours before cooking time and set it on the counter with a dish towel over it.  I find it really hard to stretch or roll out into the delish thin crust pie I like.

I would assume that if the dough was a bit warmer, it would stretch out more easily?  Am I correct?  Our room temperature is much cooler that I imagine most homes are - 62 degrees.

If it matters, my dough is made with 100% Gold Medal All Trumps flour.

Any help would be appreciated!

Edit:  Perhaps my dough recipe and prep should be included here:

11 oz All Trumps flour
3/4 tsp. instant dry yeast
1/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. olive oil
4 tsp. sugar
3/4 cup warm water

Everything is placed into a food processor and mixed for approximately 60 seconds.  Then lightly floured, shaped into a ball and placed into a 1 gallon zip lock bag that's been lightly sprayed with cooking spray.  The bag is not sealed, just flipped over on its self.  The dough rises on the counter, covered for 90 minutes then into the fridge for about 24 hours.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2011, 04:22:54 PM by Jackie_Treehorn »
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Online scott123

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Re: Pizza dough too cold to easily stretch?
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2011, 04:28:46 PM »
Jackie, warmer dough is easier to stretch, but, more importantly, the amount of water you're using for your particular flour is way too low.  You're presently at about 55%. All Trumps really needs at least 62% water for NY Style. With the extra water, it will be much easier to stretch.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza dough too cold to easily stretch?
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2011, 04:35:20 PM »
Jackie_Treehorn,

In addition to scott123's advice, you might want to try to cut back on the total knead time, especially for a dough that is to be cold fermented for only one day. You can read the way I use my food processor to make pizza dough at the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2189.msg19289.html#msg19289.

Peter

Offline Jackie_Treehorn

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Re: Pizza dough too cold to easily stretch?
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2011, 06:10:53 PM »
Jackie, warmer dough is easier to stretch, but, more importantly, the amount of water you're using for your particular flour is way too low.  You're presently at about 55%. All Trumps really needs at least 62% water for NY Style. With the extra water, it will be much easier to stretch.

How does one calculate the percentages?
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Offline Jackie_Treehorn

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Re: Pizza dough too cold to easily stretch?
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2011, 06:13:06 PM »
Jackie_Treehorn,

In addition to scott123's advice, you might want to try to cut back on the total knead time, especially for a dough that is to be cold fermented for only one day. You can read the way I use my food processor to make pizza dough at the thread at pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2189.msg19289.html#msg19289.

Peter

Thanks Peter.  I will experiment with that as it is the only way I make my pizza dough.  Too poor for a good stand mixer, too lazy to do it by hand.  :D
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Jackie Treehorn
OmahaPizzaReview.com

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Pizza dough too cold to easily stretch?
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2011, 07:02:58 PM »
How does one calculate the percentages?

If you take the weight of water and divide that by the weight of flour respectively, you will get the % of water or the hydration ratio. 

If you repeat this process for the other ingredients such as salt, yeast, oil, sugar, etc.  you'll have those percentages as well.

BTW, 60 seconds mix in the food processor is likely way too long of a mix time.  Use cold water and pulse blend 20-30 seconds at the most.   YMMV, vary the mixing time accordingly to the strength of flour you are using and the hydration ratio.  Mix more if the flour is weaker and/or the hydration ratio is higher. 

Because the food processor does such an efficient job at kneading dough you can knead dough very quickly and can overknead dough very easily.  Overkneading causes excess gluten development which makes the dough very elastic giving it the rubber band like effect and hard to open with lots of spring back. 

Jackie.....Tran  :-D
« Last Edit: January 02, 2011, 07:31:00 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza dough too cold to easily stretch?
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2011, 07:11:48 PM »
Jackie_Treehorn,

What Chau says is correct. So, in your case, if your flour was 11 ounces by weight, 62% of that as suggested by scott123 is 6.82 ounces of water, also by weight. For the baker's percents for the rest of the ingredients, you would have to convert the volumes of those ingredients to weights and then base their percents on the weight of the flour.

Peter
« Last Edit: January 02, 2011, 07:35:21 PM by Pete-zza »

Online Aimless Ryan

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Re: Pizza dough too cold to easily stretch?
« Reply #7 on: January 06, 2011, 04:31:51 PM »
It's too hard to stretch.  I let me dough rise in the fridge over night and take it out about two hours before cooking time and set it on the counter with a dish towel over it.  I find it really hard to stretch or roll out into the delish thin crust pie I like.

Everything is placed into a food processor and mixed for approximately 60 seconds.  Then lightly floured, shaped into a ball and placed into a 1 gallon zip lock bag that's been lightly sprayed with cooking spray.  The bag is not sealed, just flipped over on its self.  The dough rises on the counter, covered for 90 minutes then into the fridge for about 24 hours.

Do you "punch down" the dough and reform it before you stretch it?

Bulk fermenting, then re-forming dough balls creates a very elastic dough thatís difficult to stretch, compared to dough that has been rounded immediately after mixing, then allowed to rise only once, then stretched. It seems to me that most of the contributors on these boards favor bulk fermentation, followed by rounding, as a cookbook would instruct.

I donít do it that way, and Iím pretty sure real New York street pizzerias donít do it that way, either. Instead, I divide and round my dough balls almost immediately after mixing the dough. I never have any problems stretching the dough, even if I use it straight out of the fridge. I also end up with a pizza that is very representative of something youíd get in Manhattan.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza dough too cold to easily stretch?
« Reply #8 on: January 06, 2011, 05:53:01 PM »
Ryan,

I think you will find that the members who use a bulk rise and then divide are making Neapolitan or other styles of dough where the dough is fermented at room temperature. The only member I can recall who does a bulk rise of a cold fermented dough and then does the division is Mike (Essen1). It is rare for professionals to do that with a cold fermented dough. About the only instance I can recall where that was done was where the operator did not have sufficient storage space to hold trays or boxes of dough balls during the period of cold fermentation. And, in that case, the dough balls were rolled out onto screens, where the condition of the dough at the time of rolling was not a problem. You can read about this option at the PMQ Think Tank at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=8555&p=57598&hilit=#p57491.

Peter


 

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