Author Topic: Par-bake?  (Read 11458 times)

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Offline Randy

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Par-bake?
« on: May 19, 2005, 05:28:25 PM »
Is everyone still par-baking the crust?  Seems like we shouldn't have to, but I have had little sucess without a parbake.

Randy


Offline duckjob

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Re: Par-bake?
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2005, 05:38:27 PM »
the main reason I do is that my heating element is on the top of my oven and as a result the bottom of my thin crust pizzas don't cook that well when in a pan. I have experimented with cooking on a screen without a parbake and cooking it in a pan without a par bake and then sliding the pizza onto the stone for a  couple minutes to get crispyness.  I think investing in a perforated cutter pan would probably fix my problem.

Offline Steve

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Re: Par-bake?
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2005, 08:48:14 PM »
I'm still doing the parbake for 3 minutes.
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Offline DKM

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Re: Par-bake?
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2005, 10:44:54 PM »
I typicly don't but don't always get the results I want.

I just wish I could figure out why sometimes they turn out fine and other time they don't.

If we are having guest over I do par-bake.

DKM
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Offline PizzaBrewer

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Re: Par-bake?
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2005, 11:35:23 PM »
I par bake briefly (1-2 minutes), and sometimes find the dough separates into 2 layers.  It will expand, sometimes looking like a basketball in the oven.

I'll have to take a picture next time.

Anyone else see this with their dough?

---Guy
Man does not live by bread alone.  There's also tomato, cheese and pepperoni.

Offline Steve

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Re: Par-bake?
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2005, 06:59:06 AM »
I par bake briefly (1-2 minutes), and sometimes find the dough separates into 2 layers.  It will expand, sometimes looking like a basketball in the oven.

I'll have to take a picture next time.

Anyone else see this with their dough?

---Guy

Yeah, I see it all the time. But, I'm always there--fork in hand--to pop those nasty bubbles!
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Par-bake?
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2005, 11:18:33 AM »
Guy,

I have intentionally done what you experienced to make a panino, using regular pizza dough. I saw a chef by the name of Roberto Donna do this to make a panino on a Julia Child PBS segment (the dough and panino recipe can be found in Julia Child's cookbook In Julia's Kitchen with Master Chefs). To make the panino, you take a piece of dough sufficient to make an 8-9 inch pizza, form it into a skin as you would to make a pizza, and put it on a pizza stone that has been preheated at 500-550 degrees F. When the pizza dough balloons up and starts to turn a light brown (you have to be careful here that you don't let the dough overbake and become cracker-like), you remove it from the oven and immediately start cutting the baked dough around the perimeter (preferably with a serrated knife) to separate the baked dough into two halves. You then fill one half with things like mesclun or mixed salad greens, olive oil and balsamic vinegar (which are mixed into the greens), thin slices of mozzarella cheese and thin slices of mortadella or prosciutto, and finish with salt and pepper. Cover with the other half of the baked dough and press down gently to flatten a bit, and cut the panino into quarters. Not only does it make a great sandwich but it impresses the heck out of people when they see you make it--especially the part where the pizza dough balloons up like a small basketball :).

Peter

Offline Randy

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Re: Par-bake?
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2005, 11:40:02 AM »
Using shredded cheese that is frozen helps keeping the cheese from browning to much but it seems like we should not have to parbake.  The action of the sheeter may have something to do with it, something that we cannot duplicate with a roller.
Next week will be time for a thin crust.  I miss that wonderful flavor of the on the counter rise with onions and peppers and hot sausage and pepperoni.  And I will parbake.

Randy

Offline buzz

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Re: Par-bake?
« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2005, 08:18:18 AM »
I kind of resent having to par-bake, but then I don't have a metal- floored oven that gets up to 650!

I've had such consistent results with my Salton machine that I'm sold on it for thin crusts (it's pretty lousy for deep dish). I'm wondering about Pizza bella, Biaggia, and Ultrex pizza ovens.

Has anyone tried to make pizza in a convection oven?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Par-bake?
« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2005, 08:44:24 AM »
buzz,

I wasn't sure whether you were limiting your question on convection ovens to thin style pizzas, but I did try baking Lehmann NY style pizzas in a convection oven with good results. The photos of a couple such pizzas appear at Reply #104 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg7707.html#msg7707. My daughter-in-law, whose convection oven (an Amana electric) was used, says she can bake two pizzas at the same time in that oven. I know that our fellow member Ian from Canada has also used a convection oven but I don't know what pizza style he was making.

Peter


Offline buzz

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Re: Par-bake?
« Reply #10 on: May 21, 2005, 08:55:10 AM »
Thanks! I wonder if a convection oven would be good for deep dish as well--some of them are pretty pricey, though!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Par-bake?
« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2005, 09:43:59 AM »
buzz,

I would think that it should be possible to use a convection oven to bake a deep dish pizza. In the commercial world, air impingement ovens (like a Lincoln), which circulate hot air around and on top of deep dish pizzas, are considered to be the best for baking deep dish pizzas. Typically the temperature is around 435 degrees F. The bake time is determined mainly by the size of the pizza and the number of toppings.

Peter

Offline DKM

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Re: Par-bake?
« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2005, 02:08:15 PM »
Has anyone tried to make pizza in a convection oven?

I think it would work for thin crust.  In fact, I think it would be great for this crust and maybe even prevent the need for par-baking.

I need to find one.

DKM
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Offline scott r

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Re: Par-bake?
« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2005, 04:10:15 PM »
I have had great luck baking NY style pizzas in a convection oven.  It seems to reduce cooking times and eliminate hot spots, just as you would expect.  My big question is can you trick an oven to keep the convection fan running while the clean cycle is on to help more closely approximate a Neapolitan style wood fired brick oven?


 

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