Author Topic: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage  (Read 124097 times)

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Offline David Esq.

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #300 on: July 17, 2015, 08:00:29 AM »
Perhaps this has been discussed before.  But, the Wizards at VPN state that the proper temperature of the cooking surface is 905 degrees and the dome 800. Craig, do you ever manage to bake a decent pie with the floor hotter than the ceiling?  Sure, maybe it's a typo. But given the need to use a spatula with beech or acacia wood handles, I think they were pretty careful when putting those rules together.

Offline parallei

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #301 on: July 17, 2015, 08:12:20 AM »
Perhaps this has been discussed before. Yep But, the Wizards at VPN state that the proper temperature of the cooking surface is 905 degrees and the dome 800. Craig, do you ever manage to bake a decent pie with the floor hotter than the ceiling?  Sure, maybe it's a typo. Yep But given the need to use a spatula with beech or acacia wood handles, I think they were pretty careful when putting those rules together.

Offline David Esq.

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #302 on: July 17, 2015, 08:56:06 AM »
Well great. Now do I trust the beech acacia thing or can I use a different kind of handle?

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #303 on: July 17, 2015, 10:23:21 PM »
Well great. Now do I trust the beech acacia thing or can I use a different kind of handle?

You will be OK. Sooner or later the vendor will grease the VPN and your peel will be duly blessed.  :-D
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Offline David Esq.

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #304 on: July 18, 2015, 07:15:37 AM »
Whew!  But just to be clear. It's the spatula to get the dough off the tray that I am talking about. Everybody is in on the equipment game.

Offline sub

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #305 on: July 18, 2015, 12:10:46 PM »
You will be OK. Sooner or later the vendor will grease the VPN and your peel will be duly blessed.  :-D

 :-D   So true !

Whew!  But just to be clear. It's the spatula to get the dough off the tray that I am talking about. Everybody is in on the equipment game.


David, I've started a thread just for you.   :P

Offline mmille24

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #306 on: December 09, 2015, 11:57:56 AM »
When you take a ball out to cook. How much flour do you put down to stretch it out?

I think maybe I'm not putting down enough, as after I stretch there are some sticky spots on the dough. That will then stick to the peel as I launch.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #307 on: December 09, 2015, 12:09:47 PM »
When using a plastic dough tray or bags, I typically drop the ball into a pile of flour and then use as little additional bench flour as possible when opening. I lightly dust the peel before sliding the pizza onto the peel or sliding the peel under the pizza. When I use wood dough boxes, which is pretty much all the time now, I don't put the ball into a pile of flour, and I use very little bench flour. I still sprinkle a bit on the peel however.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Offline mmille24

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #308 on: December 09, 2015, 12:40:09 PM »
When using a plastic dough tray or bags, I typically drop the ball into a pile of flour and then use as little additional bench flour as possible when opening. I lightly dust the peel before sliding the pizza onto the peel or sliding the peel under the pizza. When I use wood dough boxes, which is pretty much all the time now, I don't put the ball into a pile of flour, and I use very little bench flour. I still sprinkle a bit on the peel however.

Thanks. I'm not caught up on the wooden box experience. Why would that require so much less flour? Is the dough a lot less sticky coming out of the wooden boxes for some reason?

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #309 on: December 09, 2015, 01:01:03 PM »
Thanks. I'm not caught up on the wooden box experience. Why would that require so much less flour? Is the dough a lot less sticky coming out of the wooden boxes for some reason?

Yes, the wood absorbs moisture from the bottom of the dough making the bottom a bit dryer than the rest of the ball.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Dippenwood

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #310 on: February 15, 2016, 08:54:34 PM »
So is it the case that caputo flour won't perform well at temps below wood fired oven levels? I'm just not getting much oven spring at all from my bbq setup (550 max). I switched to 80/20 bread flour to Caputo pizza flour and I finally got some nice bubbling of the crust. Can others confirm?

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #311 on: February 15, 2016, 10:15:15 PM »
So is it the case that caputo flour won't perform well at temps below wood fired oven levels? I'm just not getting much oven spring at all from my bbq setup (550 max). I switched to 80/20 bread flour to Caputo pizza flour and I finally got some nice bubbling of the crust. Can others confirm?

Usually when we talk about caputo not performing at lower temps, it's strictly a browning issue. I don't know why it would affect the oven spring - not directly anyway. I suspect there is something else going on with your pizza.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage


Offline Don Luigi

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #312 on: February 16, 2016, 06:56:24 AM »

So is it the case that caputo flour won't perform well at temps below wood fired oven levels? I'm just not getting much oven spring at all from my bbq setup (550 max). I switched to 80/20 bread flour to Caputo pizza flour and I finally got some nice bubbling of the crust. Can others confirm?
No oven spring sounds like a ferment issue rather than a problem with the flour.
On a neapolitan pizza journey with Wood fired oven Pizza Party 70x70
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Offline Dippenwood

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #313 on: February 18, 2016, 12:17:39 AM »
Thanks, guys. My culture wasn't very active when I used it for the caputo only run, and the dough bulk fermented on a floor by an old house leaky outside French door, (cold) so I'm guessing ferment was a big part of it. I had a great active starter working for the 80/20 run, and the dough got much more room temp time. The Caputo dough was very extensible when I opened it, though... Not tough at all while the bread flour run resisted opening. Anyway, I'm getting tired of serving soft cracker pizzas, as good as they may nevertheless be. Perhaps my pizza stone needs to be hotter too. What a hobby.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2016, 12:32:18 AM by Dippenwood »

Offline KeithGrima

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #314 on: February 26, 2016, 04:57:01 AM »
Hi Guys,

I was lead to this forum from another forum I form part of. It was clear that this was the place to be if you seek pizza knowledge !!! I have been reading this post and following its thread for the past week and I amazed by the level of details.

I am a beginner when it comes to pizza making and aspire to improve. I have started my own sourdough(100% hydration) to attempt the recipe linked in this thread.

What I am unsure of is how much sourdough do I add to the original recipe? if it calls for 1% yeast. I have started building my sourdough using 1:1 water to flour.

I will be following the 48 hour fermentation process for my pizza dough.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2016, 04:59:32 AM by KeithGrima »

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #315 on: February 26, 2016, 07:12:37 AM »
All the ingredients are expressed an a % of the flour weight. i.e. if you had 1000g flour, 1% would be 10g culture. Lately, I've been using 1.9%.

This table can help you determine how much to use based on your fermentation time and temperature:  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=22649.0 Since the activity of a culture can vary quite a bit, you will likely need to do a few rounds of tweaking to get things how you want them.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline KeithGrima

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #316 on: February 26, 2016, 07:19:45 AM »
All the ingredients are expressed an a % of the flour weight. i.e. if you had 1000g flour, 1% would be 10g culture. Lately, I've been using 1.9%.

This table can help you determine how much to use based on your fermentation time and temperature:  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=22649.0 Since the activity of a culture can vary quite a bit, you will likely need to do a few rounds of tweaking to get things how you want them.

Hi Craig, first of all excellent thread, never have I seen so much detail.

I have analyzed and read most of the thread where I am from winters are @ 65F so that is perfect. So to clarify(I am still trying to grasp certain concepts)

If my culture is 1:1 flour to water (ex total 500g) and I am making the below recipe(measurements are just an example to simplify)

100% flour = 1kg
2% yeast = 20g
60% water = 600
3% salt = 30g

This is where I am getting confused, should I add 20g of my sourdough starter which if broken down is 10g flour + 10g water(if following the 100% hydration)?


« Last Edit: February 26, 2016, 07:24:01 AM by KeithGrima »

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #317 on: February 26, 2016, 08:43:20 AM »
I do it just like you calculated. I don't worry about the flour and water in the starter when it's just a couple %. It's not going to change anything meaningfully.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline KeithGrima

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #318 on: February 26, 2016, 08:49:06 AM »
I do it just like you calculated. I don't worry about the flour and water in the starter when it's just a couple %. It's not going to change anything meaningfully.

Excellent !!! Thanks Craig will let you guys know how it turns out.

Offline Jaykay123

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #319 on: March 08, 2016, 03:43:30 AM »
After stretching the dough I top pizzas on a little bed of flour and semolina (the coarse granules not the powder) and you can fling pizzas into the oven like a pro. It virtually eliminates sticking pizzas and unintended calzones!

I run a mobile wfp catering company which makes authentic neopolitan pizzas with Caputo oo flour. Occasionally I make a pizza at home in a normal domestic 200 degree oven using left over dough balls. The results are naturally very, very different. There is much less spring and puffyness in the crust, no leoparding and it is a very chewy pizza. However, taken on its own merits, and not compared to the wfo version, they have a certain charm of their own and are still quite good in a not very conniseury (is that a word!?) or textbook neopolitan way.

Offline Jaykay123

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #320 on: March 08, 2016, 04:56:12 AM »
I've added a couple of pictures. One was a Caputo 00 pizza made at home and the other was one a customer from Saturday posted on my Facebook page. Both would have used about the same recipe and have a 62% hydration.

Also I noticed a question about minimum salt levels. I don't like very much salt in food - My impression is that food in America generally has a higher sodium and sugar content than in the uk - and I used to use 1.6% salt in my dough. The pizzas still tasted excellent in my view but they were quite a pale colour. I've increased it to 2.2% which is the max I'll go (having tried higher), it gives it a nicer brown and caramelised colour, but tastes noticeably saltier, although not overly salty. The third picture shows a 1.6% salt pizza for comparison.

« Last Edit: March 08, 2016, 11:59:34 AM by Jaykay123 »