Author Topic: Dough Temperature Formula  (Read 4045 times)

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Offline Pizza Pirate

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Dough Temperature Formula
« on: June 18, 2011, 01:14:47 PM »
Tom

Could you post some information including the formula for calculating dough temperature? Also, could you explain more details about flour friction. I was wondering if the type or grind of the flour impacts the flour friction aspect.

Welcome aboard and thanks for contributing to the forum.

 :chef: Bruce


Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Dough Temperature Formula
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2011, 08:39:35 AM »
Bruce;
Be glad to.
Friction, or "friction factor" is just a number that is used in calculating desired water temperature to account for the temperature gain of the dough, as a result of friction (dough rubbing against the side of the bowl) during mixing. The grind of the flour has no influence on "FF" but the size of the dough and the formulation do, especially the amount of water added, the use of reducing agents, such as L-cysteine (PZ-44) or dead yeast, and flour protein content. For most pizza doughs mixed in a planetary mixer, the FF will figure out to be about 35. To calculate FF:
3 X actual mixed dough temperature minus the sum of flour temperature, room temperature, water temperature = FF
The formula for calculating water temperature is as follows:
3 X desired dough temperature minus the sum of the room temperature, flour temperature, and friction factor.
Another formula that works well for doughs that will be in the 80F range is as follows: 145 minus flour temperature = water temperature needed to achieve a mixed dough temperature in the 80 to 85F range.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Dough Temperature Formula
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2011, 09:27:52 AM »
Tom,

If I am not mistaken, what you described is with respect to a commercial pizza operation. On this forum, we have a lot of members who, in a home setting, use all kinds of flours/blends, with all kinds of dough mixing equipment (including food processors and bread makers in addition to stand mixers) with different mixing/kneading regimens (e.g., speeds and times) and with all kinds and models and dough batch sizes and in all kinds of ambient temperature environments. They also use autolyse and similar rest periods (in some cases, several rest periods) and they use preferments. These variations can wreak havoc in trying to calculate friction factors for the different scenarios. Is there some basic advice that you can render in these typical home settings, or are the members relegated to having to slog through all the math for each scenario? In my own experience, I have discovered that the friction factors for food processors and bread makers are materially different than for stand mixers when trying to produce the same types and quantities of doughs with the same formulations and like finished dough temperatures.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 12, 2013, 09:08:25 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Dough Temperature Formula
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2011, 02:59:45 PM »
Pete;
Good point. For home use, where we are trying to get a finished dough temperature in the 80 degree range, the procedure where we subtract the flour temperature from the number 145 seems to work pretty well. In any case, it sure beats the guess and by gosh method. So, simply take the temperature of the flour and subtract that from 145 to get the desired water temperature to give you a finished dough within the range of 80 to90F. which is quite workable when making pizzas at home. When I make my pizzas for demonstration at home, or for family enjoyment, I use this method for calculating the water temperature, and my mixer consists of a wood spoon and a suitably sized bowl. I suspend the yeast in a very small amount of water (100F) for 10-minutes if using instant dry or active dry yeast. If using compressed yeast, I just stir it into the water that I've added to the mixing bowl, then add the flour, followed by the salt, sugar (if called for), and then I begin stirring, until the mixture looks like wet oatmeal, then add the oil, and stir in for about 1-minute, I then turn the "paste" out onto a floured surface, making sure to scrape the bowl clean, I oil the bowl, the then scoop up the "dough" and kneed in the flour adhering to the outer surface (this just takes a few seconds) and then place the dough back into the oiled bowl where it is allowed to ferment at room temperature for anything from 2 to 5-hours. I then turn the dough (it now actually looks like a dough) out onto the bench with a little dusting flour and kneed the dough for about a minute, or so, adding just enough dusting flour to it to make a nice feeling dough. Then place back into the bowl to ferment again for 30-minutes, now turn out of the bowl into some dusting flour, and roll or hand toss the dough to desired size, dress and bake. This makes for a very rustic looking pizza with a lot of old world charm. Most people that I show this to are amazed at how little work is actually needed to make a great pizza.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline pbspelly

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Re: Dough Temperature Formula
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2011, 08:51:49 AM »
two questions:
The home process you described did not include using a stand mixer.  Do you generally recommend suspending Instant Rise yeast in a small amount of 100 degree water for ten minutes before adding it to flour in a stand mixer too?

Should the small amount of water for the yeast be 100 degrees regardless of what temperature the remainder of the water should be, as calculated by the subtract-from-145 method?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Dough Temperature Formula
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2012, 01:38:09 PM »
two questions:
The home process you described did not include using a stand mixer.  Do you generally recommend suspending Instant Rise yeast in a small amount of 100 degree water for ten minutes before adding it to flour in a stand mixer too?

Should the small amount of water for the yeast be 100 degrees regardless of what temperature the remainder of the water should be, as calculated by the subtract-from-145 method?


pbspelly,

Apparently, Tom missed your last post. I believe that Tom recommends that IDY be prehydrated in warm water, at 95 degrees F, if the mix time is less than 4-5 minutes. See Tom's PMQ Think Tank posts at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7527&p=51038&hilit#p51038 and at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7684&p=52689&hilit=#p52689. I would think that a prehydration time of five minutes should be sufficient.

Peter