Author Topic: A Blackstone Down Under  (Read 49404 times)

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Offline jvp123

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #625 on: May 09, 2015, 10:22:02 AM »
Yum!  :drool:
Jeff


Offline CaptBob

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #626 on: May 09, 2015, 01:48:05 PM »
Oh man. That mushroom pie is killer Dylan!
Bob

Offline MicheleR

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #627 on: May 20, 2015, 12:30:46 PM »
Love the pies Dylan!
Quick question:
I always burn the pies in my Blackstone oven... I usually put it to the max for like 5-10 minutes and then lower it down a little..
What do you suggest to do, not to burn the pies but to still have a good crisp pizza?
TIA,
Michele

Online dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #628 on: May 20, 2015, 02:12:36 PM »
    Love the pies Dylan!
    Quick question:
    I always burn the pies in my Blackstone oven... I usually put it to the max for like 5-10 minutes and then lower it down a little..
    What do you suggest to do, not to burn the pies but to still have a good crisp pizza?
    TIA,
    Michele

    Hi Michele, thanks!   

    The BlackStone delivers a lot of heat very quickly.  There are a few factors to control to prevent burning.  I may need to know a little more before I can suggest anything useful - so a few questions:
    • Are your Pizzas burning mostly on the top?  the bottom?  the sides?  everywhere?
    • Have you done any "mods" to your oven?
    • Do you have/use an IR thermometer "gun"?  (I find that the built-in thermometer alone isn't helpful enough.)
    • how long are you currently cooking a pizza for?
    • What kind of flour are you using (many regular flours will burn very quickly when cooking at very high temperatures, whereas flours like Caputo, 5Stagioni and others are designed to work more optimally at this heat)
    [/list]

    If you can respond to some of these that will help me help you.

    Offline MicheleR

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    Re: A Blackstone Down Under
    « Reply #629 on: May 20, 2015, 03:27:04 PM »
      Hi Michele, thanks!   

      The BlackStone delivers a lot of heat very quickly.  There are a few factors to control to prevent burning.  I may need to know a little more before I can suggest anything useful - so a few questions:
      • Are your Pizzas burning mostly on the top?  the bottom?  the sides?  everywhere?
      • Have you done any "mods" to your oven?
      • Do you have/use an IR thermometer "gun"?  (I find that the built-in thermometer alone isn't helpful enough.)
      • how long are you currently cooking a pizza for?
      • What kind of flour are you using (many regular flours will burn very quickly when cooking at very high temperatures, whereas flours like Caputo, 5Stagioni and others are designed to work more optimally at this heat)

    If you can respond to some of these that will help me help you.

    Hey Dylan,

    The pizzas burn at the bottom, they kinda get attached to the stone and burn up. I try to lift the pizza after like 30 seconds that I put them in, but it doesnt always happen/work.
    I have not done any mods as I am not very technical... What mods do you recommend? and do you have any instructions?
    I have a IR thermometer gun, but not sure exactly what I am looking for.
    I havent timed it but I believe I am cooking each pizza for like 2 minutes...
    I am using 100% caputo Pizzeria flour.

    TIA,
    Michele

    Online dylandylan

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    Re: A Blackstone Down Under
    « Reply #630 on: May 20, 2015, 03:39:50 PM »
    Hey Dylan,

    The pizzas burn at the bottom, they kinda get attached to the stone and burn up. I try to lift the pizza after like 30 seconds that I put them in, but it doesnt always happen/work.
    I have not done any mods as I am not very technical... What mods do you recommend? and do you have any instructions?
    I have a IR thermometer gun, but not sure exactly what I am looking for.
    I havent timed it but I believe I am cooking each pizza for like 2 minutes...
    I am using 100% caputo Pizzeria flour.

    TIA,
    Michele

    Ok,  with the bottom burning there are a few things that could help.

    One would be a very simple mod - putting a few stainless steel washers under the stone, between the stone and the platter that it sits on.  I have 8 washers under my stone.  This reduces some of the heat on the stone.

    I'd suggest launching the pie when the bottom stone is a little over 700f.  You can go higher than this (I go closer to 800f), but for now to minimise burn I'd start there. The temperature won't be even across the whole stone mind you, but use the temperature gun to check the temperature of the bottom stone primarily.

    Also - do you put any sugar in your dough?  I'd recommend not doing that for the moment - it tends to encourage burning.

    It sounds like your bake time, and Caputo Pizzaria flour are fine!

    Offline MicheleR

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    Re: A Blackstone Down Under
    « Reply #631 on: May 20, 2015, 04:13:08 PM »
    Ok,  with the bottom burning there are a few things that could help.

    One would be a very simple mod - putting a few stainless steel washers under the stone, between the stone and the platter that it sits on.  I have 8 washers under my stone.  This reduces some of the heat on the stone.

    I'd suggest launching the pie when the bottom stone is a little over 700f.  You can go higher than this (I go closer to 800f), but for now to minimise burn I'd start there. The temperature won't be even across the whole stone mind you, but use the temperature gun to check the temperature of the bottom stone primarily.

    Also - do you put any sugar in your dough?  I'd recommend not doing that for the moment - it tends to encourage burning.

    It sounds like your bake time, and Caputo Pizzaria flour are fine!

    What size washers, and do you have any pics of them? again, im not very technical when it comes to these things...
    Do you recommend putting a deflector and bearings?
    I do not use sugar, I follow craig's recipe.
    What do you put the knob at when you turn on the oven? And do you make it higher/lower after a few minutes or when you launch?

    Online dylandylan

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    Re: A Blackstone Down Under
    « Reply #632 on: May 21, 2015, 02:41:16 AM »
    What size washers, and do you have any pics of them? again, im not very technical when it comes to these things...
    Do you recommend putting a deflector and bearings?
    I do not use sugar, I follow craig's recipe.
    What do you put the knob at when you turn on the oven? And do you make it higher/lower after a few minutes or when you launch?

    There's a pic of my washers here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=28721.msg293900;topicseen#msg293900   Note that I normally spread these out to be evenly spaced :-)   I'm not mechanically-minded either, the washers are about 2cm across, a bit less than 1mm thick. 

    Do try the "chauflector" add-on, the uglier the better :-)  but don't worry about the bearing mod - if your platter is already turning without difficulty then you're fine there.

    As for where the flame knob is...  for my bakes I get the stone to about 750f-775f, with the flame on idle - quite low to keep things stable.  Then as soon as I've launched the pie I wind the flame up to near-full.  Then once the pie is done, I take it back down to idle, and usually wait a few minutes for the temperature to come down before I launch the next one.

    You could try something similar - but to avoid burning I'd start launching at about 700f, and then work your way up once you become comfortable with the technique and happy with the results.




    Offline live4u

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    Re: A Blackstone Down Under
    « Reply #633 on: May 21, 2015, 07:42:01 PM »
    Dylan
    Started looking at neo as I got a BS oven. Lots to learn from this thread and other experts. Your pies look awesome and make me hungry all the time. BTW, the stretching seems to be perfect. exactly same as I see in Una. Do you care to share a video of how you do?

    Thanks
    Ram


    Offline deb415611

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    Re: A Blackstone Down Under
    « Reply #634 on: May 21, 2015, 07:59:15 PM »
    Dylan
    Started looking at neo as I got a BS oven. Lots to learn from this thread and other experts. Your pies look awesome and make me hungry all the time. BTW, the stretching seems to be perfect. exactly same as I see in Una. Do you care to share a video of how you do?

    Thanks
    Ram

    look here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=28721.msg337509#msg337509
    Deb

    Offline live4u

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    Re: A Blackstone Down Under
    « Reply #635 on: May 21, 2015, 08:11:38 PM »

    Online dylandylan

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    Re: A Blackstone Down Under
    « Reply #636 on: May 22, 2015, 12:44:21 AM »
    Yes that's the only video I've posted thus far.  The stretching was a bit slow and hesitant back then, over-handling really looking back on it now. But that's still my standard technique, just sped up a bit these days.  I sometimes attempt a Neapolitan slap, but don't have a video of that... probably just as well.   I'm also using higher hydration now which necessitates a faster stretch and less handling.

    Also look for a video that Gsans has posted - the handling might initially look a little hesitant too, but he is baking a fantastic looking crust.

    Online dylandylan

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    Re: A Blackstone Down Under
    « Reply #637 on: May 22, 2015, 04:10:07 AM »
    A quick fungi, with a little Edam underneath, and local fior di latte instead of the usual imported buff.

    250g 5Stag: 64%, 2.5%, 2%SD. 24h+24h@62f.

    Offline vandev

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    Re: A Blackstone Down Under
    « Reply #638 on: May 22, 2015, 05:21:05 PM »
    A quick fungi, with a little Edam underneath, and local fior di latte instead of the usual imported buff.

    250g 5Stag: 64%, 2.5%, 2%SD. 24h+24h@62f.

    Perfect and mouth watering as usual ...   :drool:

    Offline Neopolitan

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    Re: A Blackstone Down Under
    « Reply #639 on: Yesterday at 06:17:42 AM »
    Edam on Pizza?

    As a Dutchman the thougt never crossed my mind!

    Actualy Dutch people don't eat Edammer cheeses a lot since it is a cheese marketed for touris and even more for export :)

    We do sport gourmet cheeses like the Jersey cowmilk "Remeker" cheese or the matured cheeses from the Beemster area.

    Usualy I find Dutch cheese way to salty, Fat and bland in taste and Becarefull with Gouda, It is not a  strictly defined Cheese so it could be produced all around the world >:D



    Online dylandylan

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    Re: A Blackstone Down Under
    « Reply #640 on: Yesterday at 02:32:59 PM »
    Edam on Pizza?

    As a Dutchman the thougt never crossed my mind!

    Actualy Dutch people don't eat Edammer cheeses a lot since it is a cheese marketed for touris and even more for export :)

    We do sport gourmet cheeses like the Jersey cowmilk "Remeker" cheese or the matured cheeses from the Beemster area.

    Usualy I find Dutch cheese way to salty, Fat and bland in taste and Becarefull with Gouda, It is not a  strictly defined Cheese so it could be produced all around the world >:D

    With some of my pies, including this mushroom pie, I've been experimenting with using various cheeses under the fresh mozz.  In this case I don't mind something bland and salty, in fact that's almost perfect, so that the mushrooms are still the dominant flavour on the pie.    I'm sure there are other cheeses that would do a good job here, I just happened to have Edam handy.


    Re: Edam - while we make some good cheese here in New Zealand, I expect that our "Edam" isn't even close to the real thing. Here Edam is one of the "big 4" popular supermarket cheeses: Mlld, Tasty, Colby, and Edam.  Edam is actually marketed here primarily because of it's relatively lower fat content: