Author Topic: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage  (Read 59635 times)

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #260 on: September 13, 2014, 02:16:15 PM »
I know Craig you seem to do most of yours at 24 + 24, with a cool ferment, so you have zeroed in on an optimal time for best taste and handling.  I don't doubt this for a minute. The spreadsheet however shows that a less than 24 hour lead time is achievable and at pretty close to room temperatures, with a 9 percent or so starter. I assume because this range remains within the green cells that it performs to an acceptable standard. I assume it is subpar relative to lower starter percentages, longer cooler ferments, but as long as it still tastes like sourdough I am cool with that.

The green simply indicates that is the range of time-temp-% that I'm most confident in accuracy wise. It's not a judgement on the quality of the end product.
Pizza is not bread.


Offline skipreid45

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #261 on: September 15, 2014, 11:39:31 AM »
Craig I used your sauce recipe yesterday. I have previously used Cento San Marz tomatoes. I agree with you now. I also like
the taste of the Cento Italian tomatoes on a pizza better than the San Marz. Thanks for the tip.

Offline SC

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #262 on: October 14, 2014, 10:48:29 PM »
After not having access to my WFO for over a month I may have gotten a bit overzealous when I finally got to use it. I was totally psyched to make the best pizza ever for my duck confit and champagne packing visitors from Marseilles. So I did a 60 percent hydration with Caputo 00, 1.5 percent ischia(new for me). I bulk fermented at 64 degrees for 32 hours, then balls at 72 degrees for about 8 hours - no rise at all so I put it beside a wood stove at about 82 degrees for 4 hours and got a bit of rise. I thought the lack of rise was not a particularly good sign. However, it seemed to stretch out very well, perhaps the best I have made in that regard. I fired my oven for about 5 hours with a pretty large fire.  It was over 1000 degrees, pushing 1100 whenever the infrared thermometer registered a temp instead of just saying "HI" (wine has erased some of my memory). I admit I was compelled to fire the heck out of it after reading Craig's posts about saturating with heat, flame rolling across the ceiling etc. 

The bottom of the pizza(s) burned very quickly, in what seemed like a few seconds, before the top was near done and then when I domed to finish the top the whole pizza combusted into flames! No joke. Never seen that before! Maybe it was the buffalo moz - which was a new addition as well.

My guests, were very gracious but that first pizza really, really sucked. By the time I got to pizza number 4 it was OK - but far from my best. So - since this was a new starter, new recipe, new fermentation schedule, new cheese AND a hotter than hell oven, I am at a bit of a loss to know where I went wrong (other then everywhere).

So I have two questions - after reading about saturating the oven with heat I assumed hotter was better. It seems not to be so? Is there an optimal temperature?  Second - can the oven be damaged by excessive heat?  It looks OK to me. I have not noticed any cracks..... ::)

Offline Serpentelli

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #263 on: October 16, 2014, 11:59:52 AM »
After not having access to my WFO for over a month I may have gotten a bit overzealous when I finally got to use it. I was totally psyched to make the best pizza ever for my duck confit and champagne packing visitors from Marseilles. So I did a 60 percent hydration with Caputo 00, 1.5 percent ischia(new for me). I bulk fermented at 64 degrees for 32 hours, then balls at 72 degrees for about 8 hours - no rise at all so I put it beside a wood stove at about 82 degrees for 4 hours and got a bit of rise. I thought the lack of rise was not a particularly good sign. However, it seemed to stretch out very well, perhaps the best I have made in that regard. I fired my oven for about 5 hours with a pretty large fire.  It was over 1000 degrees, pushing 1100 whenever the infrared thermometer registered a temp instead of just saying "HI" (wine has erased some of my memory). I admit I was compelled to fire the heck out of it after reading Craig's posts about saturating with heat, flame rolling across the ceiling etc. 

The bottom of the pizza(s) burned very quickly, in what seemed like a few seconds, before the top was near done and then when I domed to finish the top the whole pizza combusted into flames! No joke. Never seen that before! Maybe it was the buffalo moz - which was a new addition as well.

My guests, were very gracious but that first pizza really, really sucked. By the time I got to pizza number 4 it was OK - but far from my best. So - since this was a new starter, new recipe, new fermentation schedule, new cheese AND a hotter than hell oven, I am at a bit of a loss to know where I went wrong (other then everywhere).

So I have two questions - after reading about saturating the oven with heat I assumed hotter was better. It seems not to be so? Is there an optimal temperature?  Second - can the oven be damaged by excessive heat?  It looks OK to me. I have not noticed any cracks..... ::)

SC,

I was fortunate to be in attendance at the TPS III this past weekend. One of the MANY things that I learned was the the way that Craig fires his cold oven. My impression prior to TPS III was that a 4 or 5 hour RAGING fire was a good way to saturate my oven. But when I showed up at Craig's garage around 9 or 10 Sat AM I looked in his oven to find a relatively mild/small fire buring at a slow pace. This carried on throughout the day and just before it was ready to bake (6 or 7 pm) he had a beautiful bed of glowing red embers. Which he subsequently used as a base to create the "rolling flames" with small pieces of fresh wood, intermittently added throughout the night.

So in terms of oven management, I will DEFINITELY be adopting this technique of cold-firing the oven next time. Even though it may be an 8 hour heat-up period, I will probably end up using less wood than I do with my current "Fuego from Hades" technique. My impression was that Craig's oven had the very distinct temperature zones that he talks about, and that these zones remained very consistent throughout the evening.


John K
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Offline SC

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #264 on: October 18, 2014, 09:38:49 PM »
Tthank you for the tip! I will try it out.

Offline mitchjg

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #265 on: November 16, 2014, 09:16:28 PM »
Hi Craig:

I have a question about rotating the pies in the oven with your turning peel.  Assuming the fire is on the left (I think you do that), then do you spin the pies clockwise or counter-clockwise? 

I think the way I am doing it - clockwise by coming to the pie from the right side to spin it, especially since I have a pretty small oven, may be causing some unnecessary unevenness in the bake (the side that starts facing the fire lingers in the back/sides the longest and rotates to the front at the end of the bake).

I was reading Tony G's "The Pizza Bible" and he rotates counter-clockwise.  I later saw a couple of videos and photos and saw the same.   I then started to wonder if it actually made a difference.

Thanks,
Mitch

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #266 on: November 17, 2014, 08:37:21 AM »
Hi Craig:

I have a question about rotating the pies in the oven with your turning peel.  Assuming the fire is on the left (I think you do that), then do you spin the pies clockwise or counter-clockwise? 

I think the way I am doing it - clockwise by coming to the pie from the right side to spin it, especially since I have a pretty small oven, may be causing some unnecessary unevenness in the bake (the side that starts facing the fire lingers in the back/sides the longest and rotates to the front at the end of the bake).

I was reading Tony G's "The Pizza Bible" and he rotates counter-clockwise.  I later saw a couple of videos and photos and saw the same.   I then started to wonder if it actually made a difference.

Thanks,
Mitch

I rotate counter clockwise. My fire is on the left, and I come at the pie also from the left, between the fire and the pie. The peel does block a little IR, you can see it cast a shadow on the pie. If you come at it from the right, you tilt the pie towards the fire, increasing exposure to the IR.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline mitchjg

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #267 on: November 17, 2014, 09:35:15 AM »
That makes sense.  My tight quarters makes it a little difficult for me to come in from the left without the paddle knocking into the fire, but I will give it a try.  - Thanks, Mitch


 

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