Author Topic: Craig's Neapolitan Garage  (Read 266787 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline crawsdaddy

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 84
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Shavano Park, Tx
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1925 on: June 15, 2015, 04:22:30 PM »
I finally got around to making some wood dough boxes. They are pine which isn't ideal because it's pretty thirsty, but they cost less than $10 each to make. They are designed to fit into my cooler with room for the ice block. They should easily hold 8 balls if I pack them in a bit closer. I really liked working with the dough coming out of the wood boxes.

Are you still doing your bulk ferment?


Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 16013
  • Location: Houston, TX
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1926 on: June 15, 2015, 04:34:18 PM »
Yes. I'm thinking about increasing it to 36 hours and reducing the ball to 12.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline pythonic

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2675
  • Age: 37
  • Location: Crest Hill, IL
  • Pizza......its what's for dinner!
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1927 on: June 15, 2015, 06:34:44 PM »
Meh... I've seen better. 

LOL... I'm kidding... Those pics give me hunger pangs...  :)

Yeah the flatizzas at subway even have one up on Craig's pies.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2015, 07:59:20 PM by pythonic »
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 16013
  • Location: Houston, TX
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1928 on: June 15, 2015, 06:46:30 PM »
Wow. Tough crowd. I thought I'd at least rate up there with Ci Ci's or Little Caesars.  :(  :-D
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline fagilia

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 397
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1929 on: June 16, 2015, 07:42:12 PM »
Hi Craig.
good pies as usual.
Normally i use birch plywood in the bottom of the boxes. But i use parafine oil to adjust the thirstyness. Right now i use high level of water in the dough so thirsty wood is good for me.
Its the same oil we use in sweden to fill cutting board with oil. Hope you understand.

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 16013
  • Location: Houston, TX
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1930 on: June 16, 2015, 07:44:22 PM »
Yes, thank you.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Chaze215

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 889
  • Location: Jersey Shore
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1931 on: June 16, 2015, 09:49:56 PM »
I've also been experimenting with a different fire arrangement. I think I'm going to like it when I get it figured out. You can see the pies have a slightly different look - less leoparding and a bit more even browning. They were some of the best tasting pies I've ever made. These are about 55 second bakes.
The pies look awesome as usual Craig! What's the new fire arrangement you're playing around with?
Chaz

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 16013
  • Location: Houston, TX
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1932 on: June 17, 2015, 09:13:43 AM »
The pies look awesome as usual Craig! What's the new fire arrangement you're playing around with?

As soon as I have it figured out, I'll post about it. It might not work in smaller ovens however.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline crawsdaddy

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 84
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Shavano Park, Tx
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1933 on: June 17, 2015, 09:53:09 AM »
Hi Craig.
good pies as usual.
Normally i use birch plywood in the bottom of the boxes. But i use parafine oil to adjust the thirstyness. Right now i use high level of water in the dough so thirsty wood is good for me.
Its the same oil we use in sweden to fill cutting board with oil. Hope you understand.

Mineral oil from drugstore is same thing as expensive cutting board oil for you in US. I would think it would work the same.


Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 16013
  • Location: Houston, TX
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1934 on: June 17, 2015, 09:57:04 AM »
The first time I used the boxes, they were completely dry, and the dough while perhaps a bit too dry on the bottom worked fine. My plan is to simply mist the wood with water a few hours before use so it's partially saturated. I suspect that if you use wood boxes every day, it wouldn't really matter what sort of wood you used as it would hold a good bit of moisture over from batch to batch. I will try to replicate that.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline breadstoneovens

  • Vendor
  • *
  • Posts: 665
  • Location: Dallas, TX
    • Bread Stone Ovens
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1935 on: June 17, 2015, 02:31:55 PM »
Poplar seems to be the most common. I think pine is going to work just fine nonetheless.
I am in the process of making a kneading-trough for bread dough. I know pizza is not bread, but dough is dough.

In all my research I found you want to use wood with very tight fibers, no sap and no tannin. So Oak is out. Maple is best, use it for my hand made peels but a little pricy. So i settled on ash.

Should be fun.
WFO cooking is about passion.

Online David Esq.

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1013
  • Location: New York
  • Making pizza since 2013
    • Eating With David
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1936 on: June 17, 2015, 09:30:04 PM »
The first person I told when I bought the oven asked how it worked and said, why don't you build a fire in both sides of the pie so you don't have to turn it so much.

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 16013
  • Location: Houston, TX
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1937 on: June 17, 2015, 09:53:14 PM »
The first person I told when I bought the oven asked how it worked and said, why don't you build a fire in both sides of the pie so you don't have to turn it so much.

I've always been a fire at 9:00 guy - don't know why, it just seemed like the right thing to do. This is the first time I've experimented with an alternate arrangement. I'm amazed what a difference it can make, and I'm not talking about a really big change here. What I'm experimenting is based on something a friend told me that and that I've also seen signs of in pictures from pizzerias in Naples. If you looked quickly into the oven, you might not even notice the difference.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Neopolitan

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 343
  • Location: Amsterdam
  • Pizza, Pasta Birra e Basta!
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1938 on: June 17, 2015, 10:18:24 PM »
Hi Craig.
good pies as usual.
Normally i use birch plywood in the bottom of the boxes. But i use parafine oil to adjust the thirstyness. Right now i use high level of water in the dough so thirsty wood is good for me.
Its the same oil we use in sweden to fill cutting board with oil. Hope you understand.

Parafine oil?  Doesn't it leave a sent or taste to the pizza?

Offline Neopolitan

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 343
  • Location: Amsterdam
  • Pizza, Pasta Birra e Basta!
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1939 on: June 17, 2015, 10:21:17 PM »
 :o :o
I've always been a fire at 9:00 guy - don't know why, it just seemed like the right thing to do. This is the first time I've experimented with an alternate arrangement. I'm amazed what a difference it can make, and I'm not talking about a really big change here. What I'm experimenting is based on something a friend told me that and that I've also seen signs of in pictures from pizzerias in Naples. If you looked quickly into the oven, you might not even notice the difference.

You keep us in suspense  :o
« Last Edit: June 17, 2015, 10:22:57 PM by Neopolitan »

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 16013
  • Location: Houston, TX
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1940 on: June 17, 2015, 10:43:07 PM »
:o :o
You keep us in suspense  :o

I may share when I'm ready. I haven't hid anything from ya'll yet... ;D
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline fagilia

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 397
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1941 on: June 18, 2015, 05:07:37 PM »
If it is a sent its a good one :)


Offline mrmikemgm

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 18
  • Location: Flower Mound, TX
  • Anything in life worth doing is worth overdoing!
    • Mr. Mike's BBQ Photos
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1942 on: July 18, 2015, 02:59:31 PM »
Craig, fantastic detail in your workflow, dough recipes, and overall technique.  Thank you kindly for sharing.  Amazing looking pies too. ^^^
Current Toys
Bread Stone Ovens SP1400BR
Fast Eddy's FEC-100
CookShack CB048 Charbroiler
PolyScience Sous Vide Professional (x4)
HotMix Pro Gastro (x2)
Thermomix TM31 (x2)
Big Green Egg (XL)
Thermapen (x2) iGrill2 (x2)

Favorite Beer
Dogfish 90 Minute IPA

Social
Twitter and Instagram: @mrmikemgm
Misc Photos: http://mr-mike.com/

Offline theppgcowboy

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 393
  • Location: Montana
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1943 on: July 19, 2015, 11:09:49 PM »
I've always been a fire at 9:00 guy - don't know why, it just seemed like the right thing to do. This is the first time I've experimented with an alternate arrangement. I'm amazed what a difference it can make, and I'm not talking about a really big change here. What I'm experimenting is based on something a friend told me that and that I've also seen signs of in pictures from pizzerias in Naples. If you looked quickly into the oven, you might not even notice the difference.
Are you left handed?  What direction do you turn your pies?  Counter clockwise? Just curious.
 

Online David Esq.

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1013
  • Location: New York
  • Making pizza since 2013
    • Eating With David
Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1944 on: July 20, 2015, 07:34:13 AM »
North of the equator pies are turned clockwise, peel liftingaway from the fire.

Online mitchjg

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2045
  • Location: Oakland, CA
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1945 on: July 20, 2015, 09:04:31 AM »
Are you left handed?  What direction do you turn your pies?  Counter clockwise? Just curious.

I had posed this question here:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=20479.msg349639#msg349639
Mitch

Online David Esq.

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1013
  • Location: New York
  • Making pizza since 2013
    • Eating With David
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1946 on: July 20, 2015, 09:31:10 AM »
The angle at which you turn, and the speed with which you turn can certainly impact the bake, just like the time you wait until you start the turn will impact the bake. And if you look closely enough, the amount of pie you have touching the surface while you turn the pie also will have an impact.

You can turn an entire pie by "grabbing" just one piece of the rim and pulling toward you or pushing away from you. You can do it by lifting half the pie (or 1/3) with the peel between the fire and the pie, or with the peel between the non-fired wall and the pie. You can even lift he entire pie up, out and turn, as is necessary when using a small oven but making a rectangular pie.

And, of course, whether you turn the pie so it stays in the same location or not will also have an impact on the bake.

But, the direction of the turn, be it clockwise or counterclockwise would seem to have the least of all impact unless you alternate between the two and wind up burning one side.

Offline theppgcowboy

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 393
  • Location: Montana
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1947 on: July 20, 2015, 12:02:39 PM »
I had posed this question here:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=20479.msg349639#msg349639
That answers my question to a point. I was just wondering if it is a left hand right hand thing too.  I keep mine in the right and turn clockwise. The pie is grabbed on the fire side because there is a less chance of cutting the pie as it is cooked a little more than the side away from the fire.  I like to turn the fire side of the pizza to the front by 1/3.  If the fire is on the left side I do it opposite like Craig. Did 185 pies the Saturday.

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 16013
  • Location: Houston, TX
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1948 on: July 26, 2015, 12:18:51 PM »
Are you left handed?  What direction do you turn your pies?  Counter clockwise? Just curious.

Right handed, turn counter.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline theppgcowboy

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 393
  • Location: Montana
Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1949 on: July 26, 2015, 01:32:38 PM »
Thanks. 


 

pizzapan