Author Topic: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!  (Read 454348 times)

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Offline fornographer

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1725 on: November 02, 2012, 05:03:02 PM »
Hi Omid.  I have a similarly sized oven in the Forno Bravo Andiamo 70 and am afflicted with the same problem with smoke coming out of the front.  I use a simple technique to minimize the problem.  If your oven came with a door, try partially closing the oven.  This allows the smoke to be funneled through the vent.  It's a "there, I fixed it!" kinda fix.

« Last Edit: November 02, 2012, 05:17:39 PM by fornographer »


Offline fornographer

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1726 on: November 02, 2012, 05:40:50 PM »
I should add that if you have wood that is not seasoned, it would not matter.   After I fully fire up the oven, I can add logs with little or no smoke when using wood that have a moisture level of 15% or less. 

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1727 on: November 03, 2012, 01:48:36 AM »
Omid, I feel bad for your situation.  After spending money on the oven and getting your hopes up, this is what you get.  I can already feel the frustration.  I would suggest, if time permits, that you fire up your oven late in the evening when everyone in your neighborhood is asleep.   Even if you get the temp to about 600-700F then leave the coals inside the oven and close the door.  The following morning when you are ready to bake, it will be much easier to light up the wood with minimal smoke (maybe for about 1-2 mins only).  The venting on your oven is the main culprit since the opening looks small.  I wish they had the vent opening to be more lateral than round.  

Marlon

Hi Omid.  I have a similarly sized oven in the Forno Bravo Andiamo 70 and am afflicted with the same problem with smoke coming out of the front.  I use a simple technique to minimize the problem.  If your oven came with a door, try partially closing the oven.  This allows the smoke to be funneled through the vent.  It's a "there, I fixed it!" kinda fix.

Dear friends, I sincerely appreciate all your help! I could be wrong, but I think a reason for the failure two days ago was that I did not torch the oven long enough. I remember when the dome was about 900°F, the arch was cold to my touch. I am going to wake up at 3:00 AM tomorrow morning to torch the oven for two hours or until I can feel the warmth outside on the arch. Meanwhile, I will maintain minimum amount of wood on the floor throughout torching the oven interior. At last, when I feel the oven is hot enough, both inside and outside, I will begin to place wood logs inside the oven more than bare minimum. Hopefully, it will be still dark by the time I get the fire really going. This way the smoke should be mostly invisible in the dark. (This sounds like a covert operation!  :-D)

I already prepared some dough this morning, as shown in the pictures below. The dough balls should be ready by 6:00 AM tomorrow morning. Good night and, again, thank you for all your help!

Regards,
Omid
« Last Edit: November 03, 2012, 01:52:11 AM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

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Offline Pulcinella

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1728 on: November 03, 2012, 02:49:21 AM »
Omid I'm sorry about your oven problems. I hope you can make your oven work tomorrow. Could you please make another video showing how you launch your pizzas on oven floor if your oven works? I really suck at it. I purchased a perforated aluminium pizza peel from gmetal. Too much air trapped under pizza when I use it. I find it more stickier than wooden peels. I wish you the best.

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1729 on: November 03, 2012, 08:36:17 AM »
Nobody would complain about your smoke if you lived in Texas. Hint. Hint... ;D
Pizza is not bread. Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline pizza dr

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1730 on: November 03, 2012, 04:58:10 PM »
Omid

I think I may have some thing for you to try..For the longest time I was having problems with the wood I was receiving... it was not seasoned properly and I was having a lot of problems with start ups ( and lots of smoke).  I started to "kiln" dry my wood in the oven after every use.  

So I would put the "green" wood in the oven about an hour or two after I was done making my pizzas (the oven was usually around 400 degrees measured at the floor) and then use that kiln dried wood for subsequent firings whenever I wanted.  The wood becomes supremely dry and combustible.  

I was having a party one weekend so I started a "primer fire" the evening before so that I could dry out some more wood for the party.  I put the green wood in the oven ( after the coals were swept out) a little hotter than normal ( maybe 500).  The next day I  cracked the door open and the wood looked like big pieces of charcoal. The fire started very easy and very little smoke.

Perhaps you can heat the oven with your cactus burner, put the wood in without lighting it, shut the door and let it sit for several hours.  Then light your fire.  I think you will find that this process will produce the least amount of smoke

Good luck!  

Scot

ps... New Mexico aint a bad place either  8)

 
« Last Edit: November 03, 2012, 05:00:42 PM by pizza dr »

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1731 on: November 03, 2012, 06:35:53 PM »
Omid I'm sorry about your oven problems. I hope you can make your oven work tomorrow. Could you please make another video showing how you launch your pizzas on oven floor if your oven works? I really suck at it. I purchased a perforated aluminium pizza peel from gmetal. Too much air trapped under pizza when I use it. I find it more stickier than wooden peels. I wish you the best.

Dear Pulcinella, this issue of loading raw pizzas on the oven floor is a critical and consequential subject, which is imperatively interconnected with the preceding stages of pizza-making: forming dough balls, maturation, drafting dough discs, and loading them onto the pizza peel. Thank you for bringing up this important subject. I invite everyone's contributions.

This morning I woke up at 3:00 AM to torch my wood-fired oven. Unfortunately, my propane tank quickly ran out, and I could not heat up my oven. How unlucky? Nonetheless, I used the dough, which I had prepared yesterday morning, for the purpose of demonstrating in a video how I launch my raw pizza discs inside the oven, using my pizza bench as though it were the oven floor. Here is a link to the video on Youtube:

  

This is a sphere of activity that I keep improving my performance therein. It truly requires awful lot of practice and experience, doing it over and over and over again. It also requires a great deal of consideration:

1. What kind of dough is going to top the peel?
2. How well was the dough developed?
3. How skillfully was it turned into dough balls?
4. How well did the dough balls reach maturation?
5. How skillfully are the dough balls taken out of dough tray without being irretrievably deformed or damaged?
6. How well are the balls drafted into dough discs, and how much flour should be used in doing so?
7. How heavy are the toppings? How well are they distributed? Is any tomato sauce going to be used (acidity of which can render the dough disc, below it, more fragile and vulnerable)?  
8. What is a right type of pizza peel to use? Heavy or light? Thick or thin peel? Round, square, or roundish square? Wooden, aluminum, or steel peel? Short or long handle? How about the size of the peel?
9. How much should the work surface and pizza peel be dusted?
10. How should the peel be burdened with the raw pizza disc?
11. How should the peel approach the oven floor or what should be the "angle of entry" when the burdened peel enters inside the oven before the launch, considering that the space close to the dome is much hotter than the space close to the floor?
12. How should the peel-handle be held?
13. What should be the angle of the peel surface (the "pull-angle") in relation to the surface of the oven floor at the moment of launch?
14. Should the dough disc, resting on the peel, be slid forward and thrown on the oven floor while maintaining some space between the peel and oven floor? Or, should the entire bottom surface of the peel touch the floor while pulling back the handle? Or should the front portion of the peel only come in contact with the floor, at a proper angle, at the moment of launch?
15. How much pull-back force should be applied in pulling the handle at the moment of launch?
16. Should the peel under the dough disc be pulled back incrementally or swiftly in one decisive move at the moment of launch?
17. Etc.

As you can see, some of the questions above are circumstantial, that they depend on various variables and conditions to answer them. Moreover, one's personal preferences also matter. Nonetheless, the main point remains, that launching a raw pizza inside an oven is much more than just shaping a dough disc, dragging it onto a peel, and loading it inside the oven—particularly when one has to perform this activity in a commercial environment where there is little or no room for making mistakes.

There are a great many videos, better than mine, on Youtube that one can really learn from. I have included some of them below. In this sphere of activity, I have not gotten as good as I like to be, yet I keep insatiably practicing until I get there. my personal conviction, in this undertaking, is that, one has got to accept the challenge to push oneself farther and farther, investing enough time and practice sessions in order to clear the mind from doubts and to gain the necessary skills and confidence—which do not come easy.

In my video, I utilized the same type of perforated G.I.Metal peel as you described above, except I do not know if yours is round or square, short or long handle. My peel is round (13 inches in diameter, which is the smallest in this category) with a long handle. The Caputo Pizzeria dough used in my video is hydrated at 64% and fermented (using sourdough culture) for a total of 29 hours at controlled room temperature. Although the dough balls possessed favorable constitution, they were tender and delicate, requiring soft and cautious handling.

Below are the educational videos. (As you view them, be attentive to the approach angles (angles of entry), pull-back angles, styles, and other considerations I enumerated above.) Good day!

(Da Michele)
(Salvo)
(Da Gaetano)
(Kesté, see time-mark 1:24)
(Franco Manca)
(La Tana dell'Arte)
(Pirozzi)
(Pasquale Makashima)
(Pasquale Makashima)
« Last Edit: November 06, 2012, 12:01:11 AM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1732 on: November 03, 2012, 06:46:19 PM »
Nobody would complain about your smoke if you lived in Texas. Hint. Hint... ;D
Really...grow a couple an get on with it, wherever..... :)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Online TXCraig1

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1733 on: November 03, 2012, 07:08:47 PM »
Really...grow a couple an get on with it, wherever..... :)

Would you just explode if you didn't comment on every post in this forum?
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Offline Mangia Pizza

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1734 on: November 03, 2012, 07:14:33 PM »
Would you just explode if you didn't comment on every post in this forum?
+1
Paolo

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1735 on: November 03, 2012, 07:38:20 PM »
Omid - that was an outstanding post. I would like to know if the preferred method of launch is about catching a side or front of the disc, or it is about literally pulling the peel out from under the dough with the fastest motion possible? Your video seems to show the latter, but I am not entirely sure.

John

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1736 on: November 03, 2012, 07:40:01 PM »
Would you just explode if you didn't comment on every post in this forum?
Merely repeating something you once said to me.....friendly poster. It was funny to you back then....right?  
btw, I think your math skills are adequate to see that you are involved in many more posts than I ....maybe it's just that what I have to say seems to resonate. I like to think of it as more of a soulfulness approach that CB has....but hey, there's really not that many counting ,my pizza pal....relax.  8)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1737 on: November 03, 2012, 08:03:47 PM »
Omid, I haven't read every single post on this thread, so this may have already been mentioned, but I think, in order to appease your neighbors, prevent 911 calls, and make for the happiest possible fire inspector, I really think you should take a traditional approach with the chimney configuration- straight up. Your patio ceiling looks like it could be a hassle to work with, but a good craftsman should be able to knock a hole through it and accommodate a straight vertical run of pipe.  After you clear the ceiling, put in a 45 degree elbow so that the pipe points towards the peak of the house. Attach the pipe to the roof with a bracket and run it as many more feet that you need to according to code.

The higher you vent the smoke, the less will go into the neighbor's windows. Even if they do get some smoke, you can say, "look, I shelled out x amount of money to take this smoke as far as I physically could from your home." With a chimney attached to and above the house, you've mimicked the smoke venting of an indoor fireplace- which, even for houses that are close together, should be very benign.  Also, because the pipe is so high, it should be visible from the street.  If passersby can look up and see a pipe with smoke coming out of it, they'll be much less likely to call 911.

This is going to be a lot of pipe, and it won't be cheap, but I think, if you take your horizontal run and point it vertical, you're already a good portion of the way to the house roof. Flashing where the pipe comes out of the patio roof will keep the patio dry.

Offline Mangia Pizza

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1738 on: November 03, 2012, 08:59:20 PM »
Omid, cool video....
Paolo

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1739 on: November 05, 2012, 01:46:49 AM »
Omid

I think I may have some thing for you to try..For the longest time I was having problems with the wood I was receiving... it was not seasoned properly and I was having a lot of problems with start ups ( and lots of smoke).  I started to "kiln" dry my wood in the oven after every use.  

So I would put the "green" wood in the oven about an hour or two after I was done making my pizzas (the oven was usually around 400 degrees measured at the floor) and then use that kiln dried wood for subsequent firings whenever I wanted.  The wood becomes supremely dry and combustible.  

I was having a party one weekend so I started a "primer fire" the evening before so that I could dry out some more wood for the party.  I put the green wood in the oven ( after the coals were swept out) a little hotter than normal ( maybe 500).  The next day I  cracked the door open and the wood looked like big pieces of charcoal. The fire started very easy and very little smoke.

Perhaps you can heat the oven with your cactus burner, put the wood in without lighting it, shut the door and let it sit for several hours.  Then light your fire.  I think you will find that this process will produce the least amount of smoke

Good luck!  

Scot

Dear Scot, I sincerely thank you for your advice. I do not believe my wood logs are the problem. I buy my logs from a reliable source here in San Diego. I am quite positive that the wood is well-seasoned and dry. Also, the way they are chopped under the blade of my ax is indicative of their good quality. We have been using oak logs from the same source at Pizzeria Bruno without any problems so far. Perhaps, as you kindly advised, it is a good idea to further condition my logs inside the oven the day before using them. I will try that.

By the way, I have never seen a picture of your wood-fired oven. Have you ever posted any pictures so I can take a look. Thank you and have a great week.

Regards,
Omid
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1740 on: November 05, 2012, 01:53:57 AM »
Omid, I haven't read every single post on this thread, so this may have already been mentioned, but I think, in order to appease your neighbors, prevent 911 calls, and make for the happiest possible fire inspector, I really think you should take a traditional approach with the chimney configuration- straight up. Your patio ceiling looks like it could be a hassle to work with, but a good craftsman should be able to knock a hole through it and accommodate a straight vertical run of pipe.  After you clear the ceiling, put in a 45 degree elbow so that the pipe points towards the peak of the house. Attach the pipe to the roof with a bracket and run it as many more feet that you need to according to code.

The higher you vent the smoke, the less will go into the neighbor's windows. Even if they do get some smoke, you can say, "look, I shelled out x amount of money to take this smoke as far as I physically could from your home." With a chimney attached to and above the house, you've mimicked the smoke venting of an indoor fireplace- which, even for houses that are close together, should be very benign.  Also, because the pipe is so high, it should be visible from the street.  If passersby can look up and see a pipe with smoke coming out of it, they'll be much less likely to call 911.

This is going to be a lot of pipe, and it won't be cheap, but I think, if you take your horizontal run and point it vertical, you're already a good portion of the way to the house roof. Flashing where the pipe comes out of the patio roof will keep the patio dry.

Dear Scot, I thank you for your time and consideration. I believe that if the pipe extends straight up from the oven's chimney, less smoke will be spewed out of the oven's mouth during the warmup. I wanted to do this (which turned out to be much easier and cheaper than I had thought), but my landlord did not permit me to put a hole in the fiberglass ceiling. So, that was the end of that.

If it alleviates the problem, I have been thinking about replacing my current double-walled flue pipe with one that has a larger internal diameter. The internal diameter of my oven's chimney is a bit over 4 inches as shown in the picture below. However, today I found out that the internal diameter of my current flue pipe is a tiny bit over 3 inches and a half. (I should have personally measured the pipe's diameter at the time of purchase rather than relying on what the Home Depot employee told me. Is it true that it is not advisable to use a pipe with a smaller diameter than the diameter of oven's chimney?) The next size available at Home Depot is 6 inches in internal diameter, which is wider than the internal diameter of my oven's chimney. Do you know if using a flue pipe with larger diameter can be problematic? Thank you and good night!

Regards,
Omid
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1741 on: November 05, 2012, 04:12:55 AM »
Omid - that was an outstanding post. I would like to know if the preferred method of launch is about catching a side or front of the disc, or it is about literally pulling the peel out from under the dough with the fastest motion possible? Your video seems to show the latter, but I am not entirely sure.

John

Dear John, thank you! My preferred method of launching pizzas on oven floor is to withdraw the peel with a decisive singular motion that is sometimes swiftly executed and sometime not so swiftly, depending on the condition of the dough disc, the nature (type, size, and weight) of the toppings that burden it, and how much clearance is available on the oven floor. If I feel the necessity, I let the dough disc properly overlap the peel's left and right sides, more so if it is a wooden peel like the one Bill kindly built for me. In my experience, the overlapping mechanism (which is often thought to be used as an anchoring tool) can counteract oblong landing of pizza discs on oven floor. In addition, it can prevent the dough disc from over-shrinking while sliding on the peel during launch, particularly if the gluten matrix is not relaxed enough. Good night!
« Last Edit: November 09, 2012, 02:27:49 PM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/


Offline thezaman

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1742 on: November 05, 2012, 11:33:59 AM »
 i had lunch with ron molinaro of ill pizzaiolo last week. one of the topics was high hydration dough and how it is  harder to launch and get it to turn out round. his dough is 62.5
 one of the videos you use to demonstrate the method is from da michele i shot in naples. if you go to the other video on that page there is 4 minutes of stretching and making using some very challenging dough.i think he was cussing me out in italian for tapping him.

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1743 on: November 05, 2012, 03:43:42 PM »
i had lunch with ron molinaro of ill pizzaiolo last week. one of the topics was high hydration dough and how it is  harder to launch and get it to turn out round. his dough is 62.5. one of the videos you use to demonstrate the method is from da michele i shot in naples. if you go to the other video on that page there is 4 minutes of stretching and making using some very challenging dough.i think he was cussing me out in italian for tapping him.

Dear Larry, I have seen the video () that you are referring to. Thank you for making it available, along with the other videos, on Youtube.

If I am not mistaken, judging solely by the visible strength of the dough discs in the video, the pizzaiolo probably used Caputo '00' Rinforzato flour (or a similar type of flour), which makes a dough with much more tenacious gluten structure than the Caputo '00' Pizzeria flour. The dough in the video, also, could be a mixture of both flours, which is not uncommon in Naples. The Rinforzato, in my experience, can withstand longer duration of fermentation while not compromising the overall physical integrity of dough balls, even when they appear disastrous. Naturally, there is a limit as to how far a Rinforzato dough can go.

By the way, have you ever used "Captuo '00' Extra" flour for making Neapolitan pizza dough? True or false, I have been told that it is rheologically closer (not identical) to the type of flour that was used in Naples before 1900s. It is supposed to be a weaker flour than both Caputo Pizzeria and Rinforzato, but with a higher alpha-amylase enzyme activity (lower Falling Number), which generally requires a shorter fermentation period. Please, let me know if you, or any body else, has ever used the flour, and what results were obtained. I am thinking about buying a 25-kilo bag of Captuo '00' Extra next month. It may better accommodate the speedy fork of my Santos mixer. I look forward to your response. Thank you!

Regards,
Omid
« Last Edit: November 05, 2012, 05:30:53 PM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1744 on: November 05, 2012, 05:55:14 PM »
Omid, cool video....

Dear Paolo, here is another video, in Italian, featuring professor Paolo Masi (a food scientist from Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II) lecturing on various aspects of making Neapolitan pizza. If you do not mind, please share with us the content, however summarized, of the lecture. Thank you!

Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Mangia Pizza

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1745 on: November 05, 2012, 08:11:29 PM »
Omid, it is pretty complex and in depth explanation/lecture.  I will need a bit of time to coincisely summarize it, but it would be my pleasure as to offer it as a small contribution to the forum........
Paolo

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1746 on: November 06, 2012, 09:38:07 PM »
Dear Pulcinella, this issue of loading raw pizzas on the oven floor is a critical and consequential subject, which is imperatively interconnected with the preceding stages of pizza-making: forming dough balls, maturation, drafting dough discs, and loading them onto the pizza peel. Thank you for bringing up this important subject. I invite everyone's contributions.

This morning I woke up at 3:00 AM to torch my wood-fired oven. Unfortunately, my propane tank quickly ran out, and I could not heat up my oven. How unlucky? Nonetheless, I used the dough, which I had prepared yesterday morning, for the purpose of demonstrating in a video how I launch my raw pizza discs inside the oven, using my pizza bench as though it were the oven floor. Here is a link to the video on Youtube:

  

This is a sphere of activity that I keep improving my performance therein. It truly requires awful lot of practice and experience, doing it over and over and over again. It also requires a great deal of consideration:

1. What kind of dough is going to top the peel?
2. How well was the dough developed?
3. How skillfully was it turned into dough balls?
4. How well did the dough balls reach maturation?
5. How skillfully are the dough balls taken out of dough tray without being irretrievably deformed or damaged?
6. How well are the balls drafted into dough discs, and how much flour should be used in doing so?
7. How heavy are the toppings? How well are they distributed? Is any tomato sauce going to be used (acidity of which can render the dough disc, below it, more fragile and vulnerable)?  
8. What is a right type of pizza peel to use? Heavy or light? Thick or thin peel? Round, square, or roundish square? Wooden, aluminum, or steel peel? Short or long handle? How about the size of the peel?
9. How much should the work surface and pizza peel be dusted?
10. How should the peel be burdened with the raw pizza disc?
11. How should the peel approach the oven floor or what should be the "angle of entry" when the burdened peel enters inside the oven before the launch, considering that the space close to the dome is much hotter than the space close to the floor?
12. How should the peel-handle be held?
13. What should be the angle of the peel surface (the "pull-angle") in relation to the surface of the oven floor at the moment of launch?
14. Should the dough disc, resting on the peel, be slid forward and thrown on the oven floor while maintaining some space between the peel and oven floor? Or, should the entire bottom surface of the peel touch the floor while pulling back the handle? Or should the front portion of the peel only come in contact with the floor, at a proper angle, at the moment of launch?
15. How much pull-back force should be applied in pulling the handle at the moment of launch?
16. Should the peel under the dough disc be pulled back incrementally or swiftly in one decisive move at the moment of launch?
17. Etc.

As you can see, some of the questions above are circumstantial, that they depend on various variables and conditions to answer them. Moreover, one's personal preferences also matter. Nonetheless, the main point remains, that launching a raw pizza inside an oven is much more than just shaping a dough disc, dragging it onto a peel, and loading it inside the oven—particularly when one has to perform this activity in a commercial environment where there is little or no room for making mistakes.

There are a great many videos, better than mine, on Youtube that one can really learn from. I have included some of them below. In this sphere of activity, I have not gotten as good as I like to be, yet I keep insatiably practicing until I get there. my personal conviction, in this undertaking, is that, one has got to accept the challenge to push oneself farther and farther, investing enough time and practice sessions in order to clear the mind from doubts and to gain the necessary skills and confidence—which do not come easy.

In my video, I utilized the same type of perforated G.I.Metal peel as you described above, except I do not know if yours is round or square, short or long handle. My peel is round (13 inches in diameter, which is the smallest in this category) with a long handle. The Caputo Pizzeria dough used in my video is hydrated at 64% and fermented (using sourdough culture) for a total of 29 hours at controlled room temperature. Although the dough balls possessed favorable constitution, they were tender and delicate, requiring soft and cautious handling.

Below are the educational videos. (As you view them, be attentive to the approach angles (angles of entry), pull-back angles, styles, and other considerations I enumerated above.) Good day!

(Da Michele)
(Salvo)
(Da Gaetano)
(Kesté, see time-mark 1:24)
(Franco Manca)
(La Tana dell'Arte)
(Pirozzi)
(Pasquale Makashima)
(Pasquale Makashima)

Earlier today, I made some fried pizzas, and later used the leftover dough balls to shoot a couple of videos demonstrating how I launch raw pizzas onto oven floor, this time using my wooden pizza peel instead of my perforated aluminum peel by G.I.Metal. In the videos, again, I used the pizza bench as though it were an oven floor. The Caputo Pizzeria dough used in the videos was hydrated at 64% and fermented (using sourdough culture) for a total of 27 hours at controlled room (marble chamber) temperatures. (This was actually a 22-hour dough.) I must add that I find it a good way of practicing while filming myself; it allows me to evaluate my performance from a very different perspective. I find it a useful tool. Below are the videos:

  
  

In the second video, the wooden peel almost fell on my puppy. She is absolutely okay, but now she seems to be afraid of the peel! Whenever I practice at the bench, she keeps licking the flour that falls on the ground. Good night!
« Last Edit: November 07, 2012, 04:37:11 PM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1747 on: November 06, 2012, 10:14:44 PM »
Thanks for your video's...that is a nice quick "snap" of the peel for your launch. Puppy will come back around to your trust...
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline wheelman

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1748 on: November 06, 2012, 11:46:57 PM »
That's much better Omid!  ;D
That dough looks awesome, I wish we could see it cooked through. I've been paying more attention to the smoke produced by my oven and I believe that really dry wood minimizes the problem. It's just a short time during start up that it makes a lot of smoke. 
Surely you can work it out with a little pizza payola! One slice would change your neighbor's world.
Bill

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1749 on: November 07, 2012, 01:27:03 AM »
Here is an interesting Da Michele video, in case you have not seen it yet on Youtube. It is relatively new (Oct. 9, 2012), apparently with a new, young banconista. Good night!

Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/