Author Topic: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas  (Read 32449 times)

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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #150 on: August 16, 2012, 02:31:02 PM »
Craig,
The U.S. Government seems to think it's OK....
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parallei

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #151 on: August 16, 2012, 03:06:31 PM »
Quote
Does anyone know if there is any problem using PVC in a foodservice establishment? This is a super brilliant method.

Not all PVC pipe is NSF certified for potable water use, but I believe most are.  They should be NSF 61, if I remember correctly.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #152 on: August 23, 2012, 12:24:32 PM »
Does anyone know if there is any problem using PVC in a foodservice establishment? This is a super brilliant method.

I don't get it. Is the objective in using the PVC merely to get perfectly round dough balls that never touch each other in the dough box?

I hate perfectly round hand-stretched pizzas; they have no character. Besides, using PVC creates a ton of extra, unnecessary work. This extra work is all for nothing, and it apparently reduces the capacity of the dough box by at least 25%.

Kelly mentioned being too lazy to use the PVC. I don't see it that way. It's not laziness; it's efficiency. This is a business, and efficiency means almost everything in business. Fact is, in a commercial setting, dough balls are gonna touch each other, and having dough balls that touch each other doesn't create any kind of inferior product. Also, it shouldn't be any more difficult to fetch such dough balls than it would be to fetch dough balls that don't touch each other.

If the PVC trick is used in a high-volume commercial setting, it's a foolproof way to keep knowledgeable workers from working for you. Smart workers aren't going to willingly do a bunch of unnecessary work every day that only keeps them from doing the necessary work efficiently and effectively. Instead, they'll most likely say 'see ya' as soon as they figure out what's going on.

And even if knowledgeable workers do stick around, they're gonna be unhappy with their job every minute they're there. And unhappy workers are less productive than happy workers (excluding happy workers who don't realize they're doing twice the work than should be necessary to achieve the same results). That ain't no good.
Ryan
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Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #153 on: August 23, 2012, 01:46:02 PM »
I don't get it. Is the objective in using the PVC merely to get perfectly round dough balls that never touch each other in the dough box?

No. Speaking for myself, the consideration of PVC was about maximizing the space in my cooler. The round shape is a plus.

Since my cooler does not fit traditional sized dough proofing trays (even the smaller artisan trays from Medan Plastics are too wide), I've thought about how to best maximize the space in the cooler. To be clear, I wanted some space to allow for more even distribution of the temperature and to offer room to put a small container of ice, if needed, to help moderate temps in the cooler during very hot summer days. In addition, I did not want to simply plastic wrap dough balls and stack them on top of one another due to a fear that the dough balls in the lowest part of the cooler would have enough weight pressing down on them to degass the dough enough to make a difference in the resultant pizzas.

Another considration is that a containment system be sturdy enough to stay in place (and not "sag" in the middle between wherever supports between levels of dough are) while driving over rough city streets and not be too heavy as well, particularly since the cooler gets hoisted into a steel carry-basket on the roof of my station wagon for transport.

I initially used individual tupperware containers, which work well, but could only fit 45 into the cooler. That also meant 45 containers to put the small amount of olive oil into and 90 things to clean (containers and lids), dry and store in my limited space.

So I settled on the short (1.5" tall) Cambro trays I now use. For the cooler, I have six large trays that I now load 8 balls a piece into and 6 small trays that work best with two balls each, but I can cram 3 balls into. So that's a total of 60-66 dough balls I can put into the one cooler with some space for two small ice trays and some room for circulation as well. The trays are much "grippier" than the material used in traditional proofing trays, so I need to put a small amount of olive oil into the trays (just like the Tupperware). And as I have previously mentioned I am not yet adept at getting the crammed doughballs out efficiently. I have another 2 trays that do not fir into the cooler and are the first trays pizzas are made from.

It may not be the most ideal solution, but I have a sturdy enough, lightweight enough set-up which fits a good amount of dough into the one cooler. And only 28 items (trays and lids) to oil and clean.

Granted, with plastic wrap there is nothing to clean as you simply throw the wrap away, but the stacking in the cooler is something I have not noodled....and the olive oil needed to coat a doughball for that application is more than I would like to use. And brushing each ball with oil and taking the time to wrap each ball makes the total time saved (versus having to clean containers) a less clear benefit. --K
« Last Edit: August 23, 2012, 01:47:43 PM by pizzablogger »
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Offline Ev

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #154 on: August 23, 2012, 01:56:04 PM »
Yeah, pretty much just to keep the balls separated. Actually, I can be much more efficient when I don't have to fight with my dough. Each ball comes right out, and yeah, the unfortunate side effect is perfectly round pizzas. ::)
 I can get 8 balls in a 11X16 DoughMate tray. Maybe more if I would use smaller rounds, say 3 in. instead of 4.
When I'm done, all my rounds go in the dish washer. Man that's a lot of work!
 Ryan, who are all these unhappy workers you speak of? >:D :-D

It's just an idea that works for me. I thought I'd share it. I won't try to talk anyone into using it if they don't want to.


Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #155 on: August 23, 2012, 02:07:31 PM »
It's just an idea that works for me. I thought I'd share it. I won't try to talk anyone into using it if they don't want to.

And it's a fantastic idea Steve. --K
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #156 on: August 23, 2012, 06:32:47 PM »
I'm not trying to be critical for no reason, nor am I trying to be a jerk. I'm just saying, from the perspective of someone who has worked in some very high-volume pizzerias and restaurants, that it looks like the PVC technique creates more work than it eliminates. Also, having spent time in some ridiculously inefficient kitchens, I've seen how just a little bit of unnecessary extra work here and there can contribute heavily to killing a pizzeria.

Earlier this year I went to California for a month to try to help a new pizzeria owner I'd met through these boards. Even though I went there primarily to help with marketing, I was blown away by how inefficiently this pizzeria operated. It didn't take me long to figure out that no one in the place (including the owners) had ever worked at a remotely high-volume foodservice establishment. Consequently, no one in the place had a clue how to handle even a minor peak in demand.

Due largely to its awesome location, this pizzeria should have been able to attract a ton of customers without spending a dime on marketing. With many large office buildings in the immediate vicinity, the pizzeria had lots of first-time customers almost every day at lunchtime, as well as plenty of instantly-lost almost-first-time customers at all hours. What I mean by "instantly-lost almost-first-time customers" is that people would walk in and walk right back out after looking for 10 or 20 seconds at the attractive-but-cluttered menu boards that were difficult to decipher. This was at least partly due to the extensive list of "specialty" pies junking up the menu, many of which had no logical combination of toppings.

But to get back on topic: Whenever there was any business, the kitchen couldn't keep up with demand. Almost everything was done as inefficiently as possible, which means workers had to do considerably more work than should have been necessary to get the job done. And the smallest hint of inefficiency is almost always the beginning of a big-time snowball effect.

For slices, they offered what I've seen referred to as a "poor man's slice." That is, they kept several nearly-fully-baked cheese pizzas on a rack beside the make table, and people could order slices with any combination of toppings added to a cheese slice. Whenever someone ordered a slice, a ticket would print at the make table and eventually the toppings would be added to a cheese slice, but not until the "chef" actually read the ticket, which usually didn't happen for at least five or ten minutes after the order was taken. The slice would then spend probably five minutes in the oven, which I think was kept at 500. Finally, the "chef" would put the slice on a plate and set it in the window between the kitchen and dining area, which means it would probably be another few minutes before the customer got his or her hands on the slice.

All this did was negate the convenience factor of offering slices because it takes almost as much time to go through this process as it does to just make a fresh pizza; and that's in addition to the time it took to make the pizza the first time. So essentially they'd have to make a pizza twice for every slice order. And I'm sure most people, like myself, don't want it done that way. If I order a slice with toppings, I want a slice of a pizza that was fully baked with the toppings I crave.

This was not the result of one big inefficient procedure; it was the result of the combination of several small inefficient procedures.

Compare this process to buying a slice at any slice joint in New York. In New York you walk up to the slice display and choose from about ten different slice pies. You point at the pizza you want and say, "Two of these." Then you pay. Two minutes later you have your slices and it took almost no time or effort for the pizzeria staff to take care of you. This model makes money because it's efficient and it leads to customers receiving a better product.

At the pizzeria in California, long wait times alone led to unnecessary customer dissatisfaction, which leads to a low repeat customer rate. And none of the staff, nor the ownership, had a clue that it should have been any different.

I don't expect anyone to understand the point I may have been trying to make here, but I could go on and on with countless other examples of inefficient pizzeria operations and how little inefficiencies make huge impacts on the bottom line.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline Ev

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #157 on: August 23, 2012, 08:08:01 PM »
That's cool. Thanks for your insight and sensibility. If I ever open a hi-volume operation, I'll take all that into consideration. :D

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #158 on: August 23, 2012, 08:41:44 PM »
That's cool. Thanks for your insight and sensibility. If I ever open a hi-volume operation, I'll take all that into consideration. :D
Steve.....get some sleep and be careful what you wish for..... :-D    CPAP  ;)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"


Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #159 on: August 25, 2012, 09:52:35 AM »
That's cool. Thanks for your insight and sensibility. If I ever open a hi-volume operation, I'll take all that into consideration. :D

I'm curious. I'm sure this has already been answered in many places around here, but it hasn't registered in my brain yet. I know you and Norma are friends, but I don't know much else. Do you work with Norma, or are you just pizza pals? Or do you have any kind of business of your own?
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #160 on: August 25, 2012, 10:24:26 AM »
CPAP

Bob,

Would you be so kind as to tell me what CPAP stands for? I did a Google search and could not find a meaning that makes sense in the context of your post.

Peter

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #161 on: August 25, 2012, 11:00:06 AM »
Bob,

Would you be so kind as to tell me what CPAP stands for? I did a Google search and could not find a meaning that makes sense in the context of your post.

Peter
Sorry Peter, it was just a 'lil inside joke. Ev and I have been talking together about sleep apnea. continuous positive airway pressure
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Ev

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #162 on: August 25, 2012, 11:32:28 AM »
I'm curious. I'm sure this has already been answered in many places around here, but it hasn't registered in my brain yet. I know you and Norma are friends, but I don't know much else. Do you work with Norma, or are you just pizza pals? Or do you have any kind of business of your own?

Norma and I are pizza pals, though I do work with her at her one day a week farmers market pizza stand. My friend Bob and I are soon to be starting our own mobile pizza biz, X-Stream Cuisine, which is a wfo in a '67 Airstream camper.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2012, 11:40:07 AM by Ev »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #163 on: August 25, 2012, 11:42:43 AM »
Man I jus love that thing...slick as a bugs ear an twice as cute..... 8)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Ev

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #164 on: August 25, 2012, 11:50:37 AM »
Thanks Bob
 
Sorry Kelly. I didn't mean to take your thread off topic. ::) :)

Offline norma427

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #165 on: August 25, 2012, 12:34:12 PM »
I'm curious. I'm sure this has already been answered in many places around here, but it hasn't registered in my brain yet. I know you and Norma are friends, but I don't know much else. Do you work with Norma, or are you just pizza pals? Or do you have any kind of business of your own?

Ryan,

I donít want to take Kellyís thread off-topic either, but Steve and I have know each other for about a little over 2 years.  Steve invites me to bakes in his home WFO and also to other events (that he does with BBQ grill mod and church events).  I am also friends with Steveís friend Bob.  Steve does help me at market every week.  We are always talking about different pizzas.  Steve has helped me a lot on my pizza making journey.  I met Steve here on the forum.  We are pizza pals.

Norma 

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #166 on: August 27, 2012, 11:17:09 AM »
Thanks Bob
 
Sorry Kelly. I didn't mean to take your thread off topic. ::) :)

Not a problem. The Airstream is too good not to post pics of!
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Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #167 on: August 27, 2012, 11:24:51 AM »
It sucks working with wet dough.

On the way to the market early yesterday, the large Igloo cooler full of dough bungeed to the cargo basket on top of my car when.....an absolute torrent of rain started falling from the sky. Heavy enough where it was extremely difficult to drive.

By the time I got to the market, got the step ladder, scrambled to get the cooler down from the roof and quickly put it under the already erected tent of a neighboring vendor, the damage was done. I was literally soaked all the way to my boxers and it was disheartening to see that the cooler is not waterproof. Lots of water in the cooler, some of it had snuck into the Cambro trays.

The rain got even harder and lasted like that for a full 40 minutes. By that point the humidity and moisture made every tray of dough very wet. Water all over the dough balls and water all over the Greek marble tiles I use to make pies on.

Struggled to make pies all day. Skins were sticking quite badly to everything. Lots of bench flour required, as well as a wing and a prayer. Did manage to put out some pizzas though, so the day was not a total loss. And then the Friday of mixing I knocked my mason jar of Ischia on the ground and broke it. D'oh (or dough!). First time using cake yeast in many years. An interesting weekend for sure.
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #168 on: August 27, 2012, 11:49:49 AM »
Oh boy...sorry to hear about this one Kelly. What a bummer....glad you were able to at least get some pies out though. Keep your chin up... 8)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #169 on: August 27, 2012, 12:28:12 PM »
Oh boy...sorry to hear about this one Kelly. What a bummer....glad you were able to at least get some pies out though. Keep your chin up... 8)

Oh it's up.

And as I was packing up a big gust of wind caught hold of my pop-up canopy, lifted it and took it for a 15 foot ride. It bent upon landing and is unusable. A cheapie for $30 on Craiglist, but also the replacement for a very nice, much more expensive pop-up tent which suffered the very same fate. Just as I took off the 10 pound weights I hang from the corners to ward off the wind a gust just snuck up and gave it the 'ole Mary Poppins.

Good times! --K
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #170 on: August 27, 2012, 12:43:48 PM »
I think I'll jus settle in here an watch the show.....any other bad luck come your way over the weekend man?  Sheeesh!  ;D
Yeah, I tried to repair one of those damn crazy tents once after a big blowover.....the way they crisscross together will aggravate you sooo bad it becomes a joy to finally jus smash the whole thing up into a wad of aluminum.   ;)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #171 on: August 27, 2012, 01:01:49 PM »
I once had to chase my tent (my house) through Santa Ana winds in southern California (in the middle of a horrible migraine). I went running after it, thinking I was never gonna see the tent again, but thankfully it was stopped by a tall chainlink fence beside/below I-15, about a quarter of a mile from where I had been trying to set up.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline acbova

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #172 on: August 27, 2012, 04:03:58 PM »
Wait.... How did I miss this thread???  This is so cool.

Kelly, I'm going to make a point of coming down soon.


Offline slybarman

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #173 on: August 27, 2012, 06:52:53 PM »
They said Sunday set a rainfall record at BWI.

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #174 on: September 10, 2012, 04:40:31 PM »
Wait.... How did I miss this thread???  This is so cool.

Kelly, I'm going to make a point of coming down soon.



I'm officially finished at the Farmer's Market.

It's unfortunate, but some developments at work have really cut down on the time I have available during the week. I still have a family (wanna see my 16 month old from time to time!) and another more important pizza adventure I need to devote a lot more time to. Something had to give. I wish there was time to do it all, but right now there is not.

I'll be using the LBE for a few one off events all centered in a particular Baltimore neighborhood. I am going to be taking the set-up to the new local brewery one Saturday in late September to cook pizzas for the staff and then leave. I plan to do the same for the staff at the neighborhood wine and beer store and for many of the owners and staff of the very small clothing and wares stores in the hood as well.

More pics from those days and other news later. Thanks everyone. --K  :)
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell


 

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