Author Topic: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas  (Read 25345 times)

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Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #140 on: August 13, 2012, 12:08:05 PM »
Yes, what Brian just said while I was posting....tried swapping regulators yet?

Type faster, Bob!
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.


Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #141 on: August 13, 2012, 12:14:42 PM »
No, no...I was jus agreeing that the process of elimination was a good idea Brian and I wasn't ignoring what you had said. In fact , that is really the easiest thing to do first....swapping regulators.
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Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #142 on: August 13, 2012, 12:17:34 PM »
It's the last thing I have not done (swapping regulators).

Literally swapped out everything, including the lids and the issues are the same. Which is why I am questioning the regulator.

We'll see this week.

Thanks! --K
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

scott123

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #143 on: August 13, 2012, 02:09:04 PM »
Kelly are you still having any issues with hearth recovery? This occurred to me the other day. Run a steel rod/bolt through the midsection of the grill (underneath the stone), drill a hole through the cast iron skillet and then run a heavy duty steel wire through that hole, up over the rod and then out a hole in the side, connecting the wire to a piece of wood so you can grab it. You can pull the wire and one side of the cast iron skillet will rise (like a damper). Once you have the wire where you want it, you can clamp it with a pair of vice grips and prevent the skillet from dropping. In the lowest position, you have the most deflection, and in the top, the least.

Even if you don't go with an adjustable damper-like approach, I'd still, rather than going with an 8" pan, just find a way to angle the skillet up towards the back, maybe 60 degrees.  This will not only do a better job of directing the heat where you want it (up the back and into the air foil scoop), but it should also, being at an angle, deflect less heat overall. Propping the up the skillet might also prevent less heat from collecting in the lower grill area and possibly help to prevent rippling.

Some buzz....a person connected to The Sun's food section is now a regular at the stand. A local newscaster from CBS 13 Morning Edition just tried a pizza Sunday and loved it. Got a business card with the relevant contact information on it.

Best part of this Sunday was one of my more loyal regulars just revealed he works for Baltimore City and passed on contact information for when I need to get permitting and licensing issues taken care of with the brick and mortar location. Said the person would help move things along "more efficiently". Nice!  :)

"All right Mr. DeMille, I'm ready for my close-up"  ;D

I hope that as you are vaulted into this well deserved and inevitable stardom, you won't forget us little folks.

Offline Ev

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #144 on: August 13, 2012, 06:53:16 PM »
I'm not eager to find out, but I'm fairly certain you could put bird droppings on a pizza and it would be tasty if it were drizzled with the Calabrian oil/chiles. That stuff is liquid gold. Thanks Craig! --K

Kelly, could you link me to this "liquid gold" you speak of?

Also, have you considered dough dividers to make for easier extraction? I made these myself from 4" pvc. They work like dream. A nice round pie every time.

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #145 on: August 13, 2012, 07:03:43 PM »
Kelly, could you link me to this "liquid gold" you speak of?

You make it yourself. Easy to do and Craig shows us how!

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,19368.0.html

Quote
Also, have you considered dough dividers to make for easier extraction? I made these myself from 4" pvc. They work like dream. A nice round pie every time.

Yes, I have considered PVC rounds thanks to your previous posts. Great idea. But my cooler won't fit a tray wide enough to make that feasible....and I'm too lazy to want to add 65 more objects that need to be cleaned!  ;)
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline Ev

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #146 on: August 13, 2012, 10:49:14 PM »
Okay thanks, Kelly.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #147 on: August 16, 2012, 12:56:21 AM »
Also, have you considered dough dividers to make for easier extraction? I made these myself from 4" pvc. They work like dream. A nice round pie every time.

Does anyone know if there is any problem using PVC in a foodservice establishment? This is a super brilliant method.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #148 on: August 16, 2012, 01:04:09 AM »
I recall suggesting this to Kelly a while ago - all you need to do is drape a square of saran wrap over the round, spray it with release spray and drop in the dough.  Throw out the saran wrap after you get the ball out to skin it.  No cleanup, and of course plastic film is widely used in foodservice.

As he noted, the trays won't fit into his cooler.  I suggested gardening flats instead, the kind that are basically basketweave plastic trays.  Good air circulation for cooling the dough, stackable, etc.
 
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline norma427

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #149 on: August 16, 2012, 07:29:48 AM »
Does anyone know if there is any problem using PVC in a foodservice establishment? This is a super brilliant method.

Craig,

Steve is on vacation right now, but at first he did use I think some kind of paper (maybe like wax paper, or something else, then staped it, and spayed with oil)  That also worked well.  I saw that, but forget exactly what he did.  

Norma

Edit:  I think Steve used parchment paper the more I think about it and tried paper clips and also staples.  Anyway it did work.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2012, 02:54:47 PM by norma427 »
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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #150 on: August 16, 2012, 02:31:02 PM »
Craig,
The U.S. Government seems to think it's OK....
http://www.badplastics.com/
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parallei

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #151 on: August 16, 2012, 03:06:31 PM »
Quote
Does anyone know if there is any problem using PVC in a foodservice establishment? This is a super brilliant method.

Not all PVC pipe is NSF certified for potable water use, but I believe most are.  They should be NSF 61, if I remember correctly.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #152 on: August 23, 2012, 12:24:32 PM »
Does anyone know if there is any problem using PVC in a foodservice establishment? This is a super brilliant method.

I don't get it. Is the objective in using the PVC merely to get perfectly round dough balls that never touch each other in the dough box?

I hate perfectly round hand-stretched pizzas; they have no character. Besides, using PVC creates a ton of extra, unnecessary work. This extra work is all for nothing, and it apparently reduces the capacity of the dough box by at least 25%.

Kelly mentioned being too lazy to use the PVC. I don't see it that way. It's not laziness; it's efficiency. This is a business, and efficiency means almost everything in business. Fact is, in a commercial setting, dough balls are gonna touch each other, and having dough balls that touch each other doesn't create any kind of inferior product. Also, it shouldn't be any more difficult to fetch such dough balls than it would be to fetch dough balls that don't touch each other.

If the PVC trick is used in a high-volume commercial setting, it's a foolproof way to keep knowledgeable workers from working for you. Smart workers aren't going to willingly do a bunch of unnecessary work every day that only keeps them from doing the necessary work efficiently and effectively. Instead, they'll most likely say 'see ya' as soon as they figure out what's going on.

And even if knowledgeable workers do stick around, they're gonna be unhappy with their job every minute they're there. And unhappy workers are less productive than happy workers (excluding happy workers who don't realize they're doing twice the work than should be necessary to achieve the same results). That ain't no good.

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #153 on: August 23, 2012, 01:46:02 PM »
I don't get it. Is the objective in using the PVC merely to get perfectly round dough balls that never touch each other in the dough box?

No. Speaking for myself, the consideration of PVC was about maximizing the space in my cooler. The round shape is a plus.

Since my cooler does not fit traditional sized dough proofing trays (even the smaller artisan trays from Medan Plastics are too wide), I've thought about how to best maximize the space in the cooler. To be clear, I wanted some space to allow for more even distribution of the temperature and to offer room to put a small container of ice, if needed, to help moderate temps in the cooler during very hot summer days. In addition, I did not want to simply plastic wrap dough balls and stack them on top of one another due to a fear that the dough balls in the lowest part of the cooler would have enough weight pressing down on them to degass the dough enough to make a difference in the resultant pizzas.

Another considration is that a containment system be sturdy enough to stay in place (and not "sag" in the middle between wherever supports between levels of dough are) while driving over rough city streets and not be too heavy as well, particularly since the cooler gets hoisted into a steel carry-basket on the roof of my station wagon for transport.

I initially used individual tupperware containers, which work well, but could only fit 45 into the cooler. That also meant 45 containers to put the small amount of olive oil into and 90 things to clean (containers and lids), dry and store in my limited space.

So I settled on the short (1.5" tall) Cambro trays I now use. For the cooler, I have six large trays that I now load 8 balls a piece into and 6 small trays that work best with two balls each, but I can cram 3 balls into. So that's a total of 60-66 dough balls I can put into the one cooler with some space for two small ice trays and some room for circulation as well. The trays are much "grippier" than the material used in traditional proofing trays, so I need to put a small amount of olive oil into the trays (just like the Tupperware). And as I have previously mentioned I am not yet adept at getting the crammed doughballs out efficiently. I have another 2 trays that do not fir into the cooler and are the first trays pizzas are made from.

It may not be the most ideal solution, but I have a sturdy enough, lightweight enough set-up which fits a good amount of dough into the one cooler. And only 28 items (trays and lids) to oil and clean.

Granted, with plastic wrap there is nothing to clean as you simply throw the wrap away, but the stacking in the cooler is something I have not noodled....and the olive oil needed to coat a doughball for that application is more than I would like to use. And brushing each ball with oil and taking the time to wrap each ball makes the total time saved (versus having to clean containers) a less clear benefit. --K
« Last Edit: August 23, 2012, 01:47:43 PM by pizzablogger »
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline Ev

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #154 on: August 23, 2012, 01:56:04 PM »
Yeah, pretty much just to keep the balls separated. Actually, I can be much more efficient when I don't have to fight with my dough. Each ball comes right out, and yeah, the unfortunate side effect is perfectly round pizzas. ::)
 I can get 8 balls in a 11X16 DoughMate tray. Maybe more if I would use smaller rounds, say 3 in. instead of 4.
When I'm done, all my rounds go in the dish washer. Man that's a lot of work!
 Ryan, who are all these unhappy workers you speak of? >:D :-D

It's just an idea that works for me. I thought I'd share it. I won't try to talk anyone into using it if they don't want to.


Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #155 on: August 23, 2012, 02:07:31 PM »
It's just an idea that works for me. I thought I'd share it. I won't try to talk anyone into using it if they don't want to.

And it's a fantastic idea Steve. --K
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #156 on: August 23, 2012, 06:32:47 PM »
I'm not trying to be critical for no reason, nor am I trying to be a jerk. I'm just saying, from the perspective of someone who has worked in some very high-volume pizzerias and restaurants, that it looks like the PVC technique creates more work than it eliminates. Also, having spent time in some ridiculously inefficient kitchens, I've seen how just a little bit of unnecessary extra work here and there can contribute heavily to killing a pizzeria.

Earlier this year I went to California for a month to try to help a new pizzeria owner I'd met through these boards. Even though I went there primarily to help with marketing, I was blown away by how inefficiently this pizzeria operated. It didn't take me long to figure out that no one in the place (including the owners) had ever worked at a remotely high-volume foodservice establishment. Consequently, no one in the place had a clue how to handle even a minor peak in demand.

Due largely to its awesome location, this pizzeria should have been able to attract a ton of customers without spending a dime on marketing. With many large office buildings in the immediate vicinity, the pizzeria had lots of first-time customers almost every day at lunchtime, as well as plenty of instantly-lost almost-first-time customers at all hours. What I mean by "instantly-lost almost-first-time customers" is that people would walk in and walk right back out after looking for 10 or 20 seconds at the attractive-but-cluttered menu boards that were difficult to decipher. This was at least partly due to the extensive list of "specialty" pies junking up the menu, many of which had no logical combination of toppings.

But to get back on topic: Whenever there was any business, the kitchen couldn't keep up with demand. Almost everything was done as inefficiently as possible, which means workers had to do considerably more work than should have been necessary to get the job done. And the smallest hint of inefficiency is almost always the beginning of a big-time snowball effect.

For slices, they offered what I've seen referred to as a "poor man's slice." That is, they kept several nearly-fully-baked cheese pizzas on a rack beside the make table, and people could order slices with any combination of toppings added to a cheese slice. Whenever someone ordered a slice, a ticket would print at the make table and eventually the toppings would be added to a cheese slice, but not until the "chef" actually read the ticket, which usually didn't happen for at least five or ten minutes after the order was taken. The slice would then spend probably five minutes in the oven, which I think was kept at 500. Finally, the "chef" would put the slice on a plate and set it in the window between the kitchen and dining area, which means it would probably be another few minutes before the customer got his or her hands on the slice.

All this did was negate the convenience factor of offering slices because it takes almost as much time to go through this process as it does to just make a fresh pizza; and that's in addition to the time it took to make the pizza the first time. So essentially they'd have to make a pizza twice for every slice order. And I'm sure most people, like myself, don't want it done that way. If I order a slice with toppings, I want a slice of a pizza that was fully baked with the toppings I crave.

This was not the result of one big inefficient procedure; it was the result of the combination of several small inefficient procedures.

Compare this process to buying a slice at any slice joint in New York. In New York you walk up to the slice display and choose from about ten different slice pies. You point at the pizza you want and say, "Two of these." Then you pay. Two minutes later you have your slices and it took almost no time or effort for the pizzeria staff to take care of you. This model makes money because it's efficient and it leads to customers receiving a better product.

At the pizzeria in California, long wait times alone led to unnecessary customer dissatisfaction, which leads to a low repeat customer rate. And none of the staff, nor the ownership, had a clue that it should have been any different.

I don't expect anyone to understand the point I may have been trying to make here, but I could go on and on with countless other examples of inefficient pizzeria operations and how little inefficiencies make huge impacts on the bottom line.

Offline Ev

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #157 on: August 23, 2012, 08:08:01 PM »
That's cool. Thanks for your insight and sensibility. If I ever open a hi-volume operation, I'll take all that into consideration. :D

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #158 on: August 23, 2012, 08:41:44 PM »
That's cool. Thanks for your insight and sensibility. If I ever open a hi-volume operation, I'll take all that into consideration. :D
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Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Pizza Ruby, A Little Black Egg & Pizzas
« Reply #159 on: August 25, 2012, 09:52:35 AM »
That's cool. Thanks for your insight and sensibility. If I ever open a hi-volume operation, I'll take all that into consideration. :D

I'm curious. I'm sure this has already been answered in many places around here, but it hasn't registered in my brain yet. I know you and Norma are friends, but I don't know much else. Do you work with Norma, or are you just pizza pals? Or do you have any kind of business of your own?


 

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