Author Topic: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza  (Read 14526 times)

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Offline norma427

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #100 on: July 19, 2011, 10:11:29 PM »

The second pizza made today with the wheat berry starter and the ground sprouted wheat berries also turned out good.  Steve and I thought the second pizza was the best.  This dough ball was also very easy to open, and I had to be careful it didnít stretch too much.  The method I used for this dough ball was also the same as the one posted above.  This dough ball fermented at room temperature for 7 hrs.  It sure was hot at market today. 

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #101 on: July 19, 2011, 10:12:50 PM »
Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #102 on: July 19, 2011, 10:20:26 PM »
Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #103 on: July 19, 2011, 10:21:31 PM »
end of pictures

Norma
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #104 on: July 19, 2011, 10:29:49 PM »
Steve and I asked him if he knew if the wheat grains were soft or hard winter wheat and he called someone on his cell phone, and then said the wheat grains he gave me were soft winter wheat.  I donít know or have any idea, if this is why the dough is so soft.

Norma,

Soft winter wheat flour is used to make things like cakes and pastries. The protein content for such flours is around 8.5-9.5%. The hydration value can be around 52%. That perhaps explains why the dough was so soft. The long room temperature ferment in the 90+ temperature range perhaps didn't help matters much either. It was an accomplishment that you were able to get the pizzas into your oven.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #105 on: July 19, 2011, 11:09:57 PM »
Norma,

Soft winter wheat flour is used to make things like cakes and pastries. The protein content for such flours is around 8.5-9.5%. The hydration value can be around 52%. That perhaps explains why the dough was so soft. The long room temperature ferment in the 90+ temperature range perhaps didn't help matters much either. It was an accomplishment that you were able to get the pizzas into your oven.

Peter


Peter,

I understand soft winter wheat is used to make things like cakes and pastries, but since I did use KASL as the flour, would the wheat berry starter also cause the dough to be so soft?  I did notice how differently the wheat berry starter does bubble.  It never get big bubbles after I feed it, but does double in volume in a couple of hrs.  Since I had made this dough on Friday, I also noticed how slowly the wheat berry starter did ferment the dough, until I had it at the higher room temperatures today.  The wheat berry starter almost reminds me of the milk kefir starter at how slowly it ferments the dough.  I donít know if there is an explanation for that or not. 

Norma
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #106 on: July 19, 2011, 11:22:25 PM »
Norma,

I misunderstood your earlier post where you talked about the farmer and your use of his grains to make the pizzas. I had forgotten that you were using only the natural starter and not flour made from the same grains for the first pizza. If you were using KASL with the natural starter, then I would tend to attribute the dough softness to the long fermentation time at high room temperature. How much starter/preferment did you use for the first pizza?

Peter

Offline norma427

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #107 on: July 19, 2011, 11:54:36 PM »
Norma,

I misunderstood your earlier post where you talked about the farmer and your use of his grains to make the pizzas. I had forgotten that you were using only the natural starter and not flour made from the same grains for the first pizza. If you were using KASL with the natural starter, then I would tend to attribute the dough softness to the long fermentation time at high room temperature. How much starter/preferment did you use for the first pizza?

Peter


Peter,

I used the same formula I posted at Reply 6 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14122.msg141602.html#msg141602 but upped the hydration to 63% and used 15 grams of the starter for the first pizza.  I also used the same formula for the second pizza, with the added ground sprouted wheat.  I did add 1/4 tsp. honey to both doughs. 

Thanks for letting me know you would attribute the softness to the long fermentation at high room temperatures.  The dough did look like it was ready to be used before I used it, but I let it go a while longer. 

Norma
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #108 on: July 20, 2011, 11:48:13 AM »
Norma, that slice at the end of reply 102 looks absolutely delicious. No joke, I could feel my mouth salivating after looking at it for only a couple seconds.

Craig
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Offline norma427

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #109 on: July 20, 2011, 01:44:17 PM »
Norma, that slice at the end of reply 102 looks absolutely delicious. No joke, I could feel my mouth salivating after looking at it for only a couple seconds.

Craig

Craig,

Thanks, for your kind comments about the slice posted at the end of post 102.  :) Lol, all the great pizzas you make, it sure is funny that slice had you salivating.  :-D These pizzas using fresh ingredients do really have a different taste in the crust.  If I had to guess why, I would guess it was from the different kind of starter, but donít know.  The wheat berry starter acts and smells different than any I tried before.  I sure would like to try the starter in you ďgarage WFOĒ!  ;D

Norma
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Offline texmex

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #110 on: July 23, 2011, 09:55:37 AM »
WHy? Because it's there! 

Great job, Norma...and thanks for another fascinating thread!
Reesa

Offline norma427

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #111 on: July 23, 2011, 10:42:02 AM »
WHy? Because it's there!  

Great job, Norma...and thanks for another fascinating thread!


texmex,

Thanks for thinking this was a fascinating thread!  :) I have fed my wheat berry starter today, and am going to try it in a hybrid Reinhart dough.

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #112 on: July 24, 2011, 07:27:46 AM »
I used the same formula I posted at Reply 99 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14368.msg147406.html#msg147406 for the hybrid Reinhart dough, but used the fresh wheat berry starter, ground sprouted wheat berries, and changed the oil from olive oil to manteca to mix the dough. 

I used the same methods for mixing, as I did at market.  The final dough temperature was 78.5 degrees F.  Although the wheat berry starter did add more moisture, because it had some liquid in the starter, this dough also felt much softer than the hybrid Reinhart dough I made at market.  The dough ball was floured and also oiled, as the dough ball at market was.

Picture of dough, after being mixed in my Kitchen Aid mixer, dough ball yesterday, and dough ball bottom and top this morning. 

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #113 on: July 25, 2011, 12:15:32 PM »
I tried to mill some of the wheat grains this morning.  I tried to pick though the wheat grains to get damaged wheat grains out, take any dirt out, and also get some chaff off the grains.  I then used Steveís Barley Cracker he lent me. I ran the wheat grains though the cracker 5 times. The wheat grains are now cracked, but not milled.  I donít know if cracked wheat grains can be used for pizza dough, but I might try later today to grind some of the cracked grains in my little spice and nut grinder.  I have put the cracked wheat grains in the refrigerator until I can decide what to do with them.  I would like to try a soaker in a dough for next week with some of what I tried to grind today.

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Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #114 on: July 25, 2011, 12:16:13 PM »
Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #115 on: July 25, 2011, 06:17:35 PM »

The hybrid Reinhart dough ball that was made with the wheat starter, ground sprouted wheat, and manteca was still really soft today.  It is fermenting slowly.  I did a reball and only floured it lightly.  I will be interested in tasting the pizza made from this dough.

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Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #116 on: July 26, 2011, 11:13:03 PM »
This dough ball was the softest dough ball I have ever worked with.  I let the dough ball warm- up about 5 hrs. at the ambient room temperature of around 92 degrees F.  The dough ball didnít rise very much, but the dough ball kept sliding around in the plastic container, whenever it was picked up.  I never saw that before, and donít know if that came from adding the manteca or not.  I donít know if I didnít add enough of the wheat starter to this dough or if somehow the high hydration and oil kept the crust from having much oven spring.  After the dough ball was slid out of the container it was floured some and it almost fell open.  I almost couldnít get the skin onto the peel, that is how soft the dough was.  I had to think about how I had made some Pizzarium doughs before and draped the skin over my forearms to be able to get it onto the peel, without it stretching anymore.  I think this dough would have stretched forever. 

I didnít really like the taste of the crust.  It almost tasted like a English Muffin and also looked like a English Muffin.  That darn Steve and our friend Randy, kept joking around, and Steve kept trying to take a picture of my while I was reheating a slice of a preferment Lehmann dough for a customer.  At least I had the spatula in front of my face, so he couldnít get me..lol  :-D

It still wonders me, why the dough was so soft.  ::)

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Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #117 on: July 26, 2011, 11:15:28 PM »
Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #118 on: July 26, 2011, 11:17:51 PM »
Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Grinding Flour Fresh from a Wheat Field to Make a Pizza
« Reply #119 on: July 26, 2011, 11:24:38 PM »
I also should have posted the picture of Randy that Steve took.  Both of them were trying to get me to mess up with my experiments today. 

Norma
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