Author Topic: coopers brewers yeast?  (Read 3539 times)

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Offline c0mpl3x

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coopers brewers yeast?
« on: July 13, 2011, 12:46:35 AM »
picked some up at the local tobacco shop when i was buying cigars.   anyone ever use or hear of this?  parent company is supposedly the largest DIY homebrew company.

http://www.amazon.com/Coopers-Brewers-Yeast-0-52-Ounce-Packet/dp/B001D6IVD8/?tag=pizzamaking-20
Hotdogs kill more people than sharks do, yearly.


Offline Bob1

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Re: coopers brewers yeast?
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2011, 07:33:14 AM »
 I used it for Bread and Pizza and it had a really good taste.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: coopers brewers yeast?
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2011, 08:47:53 AM »
Actually, brewer's yeast and baker's yeast are essentially the same. The only real difference is in their tolerance to alcohol. If I remember correctly, baker's yeast will tolerate about 12% alcohol and brewer's yeast will tolerate about 13% alcohol. While this may not seem like a lot, it is huge when you are a brewing company fermenting for alcohol. When I was in Saudi Arabia many years ago I would read about some poor fellow getting caught at the airport trying to smuggle in some brewers yeast, with a VERY harsh penalty). You could buy baker's yeast in the local market, and we used it to make beer, wine, and some distilled alcohol spirits. Like I said, they're essentially one and the same.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Bob1

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Re: coopers brewers yeast?
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2011, 10:01:42 AM »
Tom,
When you say the same, do you mean taste also?  I keep reading posts that all yeasts taste the same.  I find a wide variety in flavor and mostly use Fleischman's fresh cake yeast, because of availability.  I crumble it up as it freezes and use pea size pieces.  I find it holds up for about three months.  My wife can not taste it, but I have pegged it in a few Places in my area.  I consider that a blind study.
I was tested years ago and was found to be classified as a predominant taster.  There has also been a few threads about cake yeast and other people seem to agree.  What are your views.       

Thanks,

Bob

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: coopers brewers yeast?
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2011, 11:10:53 AM »
Bob;
We have never found there to be a difference in flavor of the baked products made with either bakers or brewers yeast. It is not a good idea to freeze fresh yeast/compressed yeast as this significantly impairs it's activity due to damaged yeast cells resulting from being frozen.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: coopers brewers yeast?
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2011, 02:09:48 PM »
Bob;
We have never found there to be a difference in flavor of the baked products made with either bakers or brewers yeast.

Tom,

Is this true of both top and bottom fermenting brewer's yeast, or just top-fermenting?

Craig
Pizza is not bread.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: coopers brewers yeast?
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2011, 02:48:47 PM »
Craig;
It is true only for top brewers yeast as it ferments at roughly the same temperature range as bakers yeast. The bottom fermenting yeasts ferment at a temperature lower than what bakers and top fermenting brewers yeast can ferment at. As a result, there is a difference in the balance of acid and alcohol formed, hence a difference in flavor too.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline jpc

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Re: coopers brewers yeast?
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2011, 04:13:59 PM »
I'm curious about the yeast taste...

I'm a long-time homebrewer (20+ years), and have used probably 18 or so different yeast strains in brewing.  Of them all, the most unique happen to be the Belgian yeasts and German Hefeweizen yeasts.  These yeasts produce a lot of phenolics (e.g., clove, bubble gum, or banana flavors), which gives rise to those flavors in the beer.  A number of other yeasts, predominantly English ale yeasts, can give a fruitiness to the beers (plum, apple, etc.).

I haven't gotten around to doing pizza with a Hefe yeast yet, but I'm dying to try.  I'd be curious to see if some of the flavors come out in the dough.  If it does, I'm not sure the flavor will complement it well, but it would still be an interesting experiment.

Offline ScottTX

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Re: coopers brewers yeast?
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2011, 06:18:15 AM »
Took me a minute, but I finally found this article I read a while back. The author tackles bread from beer yeast, he used a Hefeweizen yeast, shares his results. Lots of notes and pictures.

http://scintilla.nature.com/node/1000202

Quote
So how did it taste? The bread tasted excellent, but to be honest Ė I couldnít detect any aroma that I canít get using conventional bakerís yeast.

Offline widespreadpizza

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