Author Topic: Pizza School - 101  (Read 1736 times)

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Offline JJP

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Pizza School - 101
« on: August 15, 2011, 09:40:19 AM »
Wow, I have to say that the further I go down the Rabbit Hole I find even more information to confuse me. Maybe confuse is the wrong word but the only one that comes to mind. Soooo I was thinking that if the Mods and 1000+ post member were to put a carriculum together as if there was a formal class on making pizza ...what would the basics be?
What would the first dough type to be?
What would be the first Pizza style be?

...... Has this idea even been approached?
« Last Edit: August 15, 2011, 09:42:52 AM by JJP »


Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Pizza School - 101
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2011, 03:08:55 PM »
JJP;
Actually, we do a pizza school. It is a pizza class that we offer once a year, we've been doing it for over 25 years now. The name of the class is Practical Pizza Production and Technology. Before getting into dough formulations, sauce formulations, etc., we cover the basic function of ingredients that make up each of the component parts of the pizza (dough/crust, sauce, cheese, and meat toppings, then we go on to pizza pans and tools, this year we are adding a presentation on (POS) systems, and a suppliers presentation period, then we go into the fun part and begin making dough and sauce, followed by lots of pizzas. The class is designed for everyone from home pizza makers thinking about opening their own shop, to existing store owners wanting to know more about the technology side of pizza production. To learn more about this class, go to our web site at <www.aibonline.org> and look under seminars/ School of Baking.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline JJP

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Re: Pizza School - 101
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2011, 09:27:55 PM »
Well I have been looking for a diffrent line of work but that 12K price tag is a bit of a downer...... Perhaps the constuction industry will come back soon?... :-\

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Pizza School - 101
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2011, 10:10:04 PM »
JJP, I assume you are in construction, so what you are asking for is a single blueprint that could be used to build a house, a school, factory, or an office building.  Pizza 101 is: figure out what you want your pizza to be, then work form there.  There are instructions for pretty much any type of pizza you want on this board, and the stickies are the coursework.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza School - 101
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2011, 11:53:20 AM »
JJP,

As a Moderator who has been active and spent several years on the forum, and who knows where all of the bodies are buried, I can understand how difficult it must be for new members to navigate the forum and find things. The forum does have a well-maintained and monitored indexing system (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php) that you might want to study to get the lay of the land, but the sheer amount of information can still be overwhelming, especially as the forum has grown and now records about 3000-4000 new posts a month. A course such as offered by AIB (where Tom Lehmann works) and others helps bring order out of chaos, but at a price. For chaos on this forum, you pay nothing. You have to work for food. All of our members are unpaid volunteers who contribute and help others in need because of their kind and generous nature.

However, to address your question specifically, if I were to create a Pizza101 curriculum, it would have three main parts. First would be a discussion of all of the different ingredients that go into making different kinds of pizzas. This would include flours types/blends, yeast types, and other related ingredients (like salt, sugar and oils/fats) and how and why they are used. Second would be a discussion of pizza gear and apparatus that can be used to make pizza, including dough mixing equipment (I would also include a hand kneading option), the use of baking media such as pizza stones/tiles, pizza screens, disks, pans, etc., peels, cutters, scales, storage containers, useful gadgets, and ovens. Third would be a discussion of the different pizza styles and what goes into them and how best to make them. For actual hands-on pizza making, the students could select a particular style of pizza to make. Absent such a selection, I personally would suggest a basic NY street style pizza.

As an alternative to the above three-part approach, a curriculum could be devised that addresses only a single type or style pizza. For example, a course could be devised to instruct how to make just a NY style pizza, a Chicago deep-dish pizza, an American style pizza, a Neapolitan style pizza, etc. The course of instruction, including ingredients, dough preparation and management, recommended pizza gear, sources, etc., would be targeted to only that style of pizza. This course would be an easier one than the more general and comprehensive three-part curriculum outlined above because of its narrower scope.

In your case, for now, I would suggest the following:

1. Study the forum's indexing system to get an overall understanding of the way the indexing system is set up and run. A side benefit of this exercise is that you will also learn better where to enter new posts. This makes my job as a Moderator easier since I don't have to move things around if posted in the wrong place.

2. Learn how to use the forum's search features. There are essentially two such features, an Advanced search feature accessed at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?action=search;advanced and a Google Custom Search that can be accessed at the bottom of the forum's index page. For a discussion of how best to use the Advanced search feature, see http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3101.msg26282.html#msg26282. The Advanced search feature will only look for the specific keywords listed, including misspelled words. By contrast, the Google Custom Search tolerates misspelled words and other errors and is broader in the scope of its search. I frequently use both search features, often several times a day.

3. Check out the forum's Pizza Glossary at http://www.pizzamaking.com/pizza_glossary.html. When I suggest the Pizza Glossary to new members, I usually tell them to read the entire Pizza Glossary at least twice so that the information has a better chance of sinking in.

4. If you are only interested in a particular pizza style, limit your research and study to that one style, using the forum's index and board devoted to that style along with using the aforementioned search features, if needed. You might also check out the stickies to see if they are what you are looking for. For some specific dough recipes, you might also check out the collections set forth at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8297.0.html ("emergency" dough recipes) and at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11860.0.html (New York style dough recipes). For the Lehmann NY style dough recipe, which may well be the most popular recipe on the forum, you might check out the Roadmap at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1453.0.html.

5. Once you are able to enjoy a measure of success with your pizza making, you might explore the forum's dough calculating tools at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dough_tools.html. You should also check out the tools that one of the forum's members, November, created for the benefit of our members at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/.

6. If none of the above gets you what you are looking for, post what you are looking for on the forum. We have some amazingly talented and knowledgeable members on the forum.

Peter
« Last Edit: August 17, 2011, 07:08:02 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline JJP

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Re: Pizza School - 101
« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2011, 08:07:59 PM »
Tom,
 I would love to attend the school as i know it would be a world of information from some very experienced teachers! Perhaps another day, but till then I will glean all the information I can from the P-M.com site. I have my work cut out for me!

TS, Yep  you got it right Im a refugee of the construction industry. To some degree Im looking for a sort of blue print but to be more specific Im looking for the Details. Really trying to see what the Mods and senior member would consider the basics or building blocks of the pizza practice. Once you understand the basics then the rest tends to fall in to place with some understanding. If you cant read or understand the details youl will never be able to create a liveable structure. Just my way of making sense of it all!

Pete-Zaa,
  Thank you for that direction and insight, I know it took some time to put that together and I trully appreciate it! Ive spent an hour or more a day researching and diggin and digging and digging.... Im stoked and this is an awsome sight! I just hope that I can contribute some day!
 
« Last Edit: August 19, 2011, 06:44:17 AM by JJP »

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Pizza School - 101
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2011, 08:36:34 PM »
Well, I have made pizza for a long time without really giving it much thought, any more than any of the other things I cook (I cook a lot).  After building an oven and discovering this place, not much has changed, but my understanding of why I do what I do, whether taught (by my Grandmother) or learned the hard way has increased exponentially.

For pizza specifically you have three things:

Dough
Sauce
Heat

Learn those three things in depth and specific to your equipment and type of pizza, and you win.

(Toppings and cheese are not really learned, they are more preference)


 

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