Author Topic: Sicilian Sea Salt  (Read 4937 times)

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Offline dankfoot

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Sicilian Sea Salt
« on: June 21, 2005, 09:57:06 AM »
Where can I buy this?

I have looked at almost all of my local stores?

Thanks,
Chris


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Sicilian Sea Salt
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2005, 10:24:13 AM »
Chris,

If you are lucky like fellow member scott r and have access to good high-end Italian specialty foods stores, you might be able to find Sicilian sea salt there. Otherwise, you may have to look at online sources. A couple of these are saltworks.com and salttraders.com. There are many others, and doing a Google search will lead to several possibilities. I believe the Sicilian sea salt that pftaylor uses is a fine ground salt so you may want to keep the degree of coarseness in mind as you examine the different possibilities. I personally have the coarse Sicilian sea salt which I use both as a table condiment and for dough uses, but I use a mortar and pestle to grind it down a bit before using in a dough.

Peter

Offline dankfoot

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Re: Sicilian Sea Salt
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2005, 10:46:21 AM »
Thanks Peter,

Do you know if it is any better than plain sea salt? That is what I have been using but I just though I would try something new.

Chris

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Sicilian Sea Salt
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2005, 11:36:16 AM »
Chris,

I personally like it better but I think it is largely in my mind so I tend to doubt that I could tell the difference in a blind taste test, at least in a pizza crust. I have six different salts in my pantry, and your last post prompted me to test them all out.

I have the cheap table salt that comes in a tubular container, a fine grade sea salt from the Whole Foods bin, Morton's Kosher salt, Morton's canning/pickling salt, a coarse grade of Sicilian sea salt, and the Baleine brand of coarse grade sea salt crystals. I don't have the greatest taste buds (except for sugar), but, to be honest, I couldn't tell much difference. If I were forced to pick just one, I would pick the Baleine sea salt. It has a nice, clean flavor. But I doubt that I could pick it out in a blind test. I know there are many differences among salts, from the way they are mined or otherwise produced, mineral content, and additives/anti-caking agents, color, etc., but fundamtally they are all basically sodium chloride. Professional pizza operators of course pick the cheapest salt, which is table salt. There are a few exceptions, one of which is Una Pizza Napoletana in NYC, which uses Sicilian sea salt. I'm sure there are also a few copycats, including me :). Gourmet salts seem to be in vogue these days, so with that usually comes a lot of hype and, naturally, high prices. But, like you, once in a while I like to try something new out just as a change of pace and on the chance that I might find something I really like.

Peter

Offline scott r

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Re: Sicilian Sea Salt
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2005, 12:09:43 PM »
Dankfoot, I just wanted to add that way back in one of Marco's earlier posts he mentions that the non iodised salt seems to perform better. 

Offline dankfoot

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Re: Sicilian Sea Salt
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2005, 12:22:36 PM »
Thanks for all the help.

Offline pizzaqueen

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Re: Sicilian Sea Salt
« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2005, 08:02:13 AM »
Hello,
My name is Rose, I work at penn mac in Pittsburgh. We have a web site...pennmac.com, I am going to put some varieties of sea salt on our site today, Any questions call 1-800-223-5928, ask Peter about me.
Thanks, Rose
Pizza Queen Jr.

Offline David

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Re: Sicilian Sea Salt
« Reply #7 on: June 28, 2005, 08:52:13 AM »
Monterey Market in Berkeley CA apparently had Antica Salina Trapani Sea Salt for $1.99/1000gms.Don,t know if they do Mail Order or not?Whole Foods stores carry a variety of French,Welsh etc.all are overpriced IMO.
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Offline David

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If you're looking for a date... go to the Supermarket.If you're looking for a wife....go to the Farmers market

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Sicilian Sea Salt
« Reply #9 on: June 28, 2005, 11:52:18 AM »
Monterey Market in Berkeley CA apparently had Antica Salina Trapani Sea Salt for $1.99/1000gms.

Cost Plus World Market sells Antica Salina Trapani Sea Salt for $2.69 for 750g in both fine and coarse. Bought some yesterday - haven't had a chance to try it out.

Bill/SFNM


Offline Les

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Re: Sicilian Sea Salt
« Reply #10 on: June 30, 2005, 05:13:30 PM »
I love to eat lightly salted fresh tomatoes, so some time ago I undertook trying every type of sea salt I could find (I eliminated commercial Morton type salts right off the bat . . . too much salty "bite" made them have an almost artificial flavor to me).  I can't remember what all the brands I tried were, but I remember Sicilian brands,  Atlantic brands, Mediterranian brands, a Dead Sea brand, a Great Salt Lake brand, etc.  There really were differences, but one salt stood far above the rest in my opinion, and that was Redmond Real Salt, a salt  mined from several million year old sea beds that are now buried far underground.

Here's their website:  http://www.realsalt.com/

For one thing, it is pinkish in color, and it seems almost moist compared to other salts (though it probably isn't).  When I tried it, I tasted a salt which for the first time actually had flavor beyond saltiness; in fact, it is about 1/4 less salty than normal sea salt (IMO), so I always increase the salt measure by 1/4 when I cook with it.  I highly recommend trying it if you haven't. Here's an excerpt their website:

"Long before the earth knew pollutants of any kind, a huge, ancient sea covered what is now North America. Pure, natural salt was the main ingredient of this sea, and over millions of years, the water evaporated, leaving the salt in undisturbed deposits. At some point during the earth's Jurassic era, a range of volcanos erupted around the ancient sea bed, sealing the salt with layers of thick volcanic ash, protecting these precious deposits against the pollution that man would eventually introduce into the environment. Near the small town of Redmond, in central Utah, approximately 200 miles south of Salt Lake City, we extract this hand-selected salt from deep within the earth, and bring it to you in its pure, natural state-without any additives, chemicals, or heat processing. . . . RealSalt's unique flecks of color are the result of more than 50 natural trace minerals essential to human health (including natural iodine!)."

Offline pizzanapoletana

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Re: Sicilian Sea Salt
« Reply #11 on: July 01, 2005, 08:53:08 PM »
For pizza dough you need a salt with high hydrospicity (I am not sure of the translation...), which is the capacity of be dissolved in water.
Sea salt have the highest and Sicilian sea salt was proved to be the best.

Ciao

Offline Les

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Re: Sicilian Sea Salt
« Reply #12 on: July 01, 2005, 10:42:09 PM »
For pizza dough you need a salt with high hydrospicity (I am not sure of the translation...), which is the capacity of be dissolved in water.
Sea salt have the highest and Sicilian sea salt was proved to be the best.

Do you, by chance, have a link to the study?  That would be interesting info.

Offline pizzanapoletana

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Re: Sicilian Sea Salt
« Reply #13 on: July 02, 2005, 08:13:30 AM »
I do not have a link but I have different papers that I have used for my research on pizza, thet were produced by some Italian leading universities.

Ciao

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Sicilian Sea Salt
« Reply #15 on: July 02, 2005, 11:45:19 AM »
Marco, the term you were looking for--from the dictionary--is hygroscopicity, from hygroscopic--the ability of a substance to absorb moisture from its surroundings. Although not in the dictionary for the same meaning (at least the several dictionaries I checked), the term is also often spelled hydroscopicity, from hydroscopic.

I read an interesting article this morning at the online Slate magazine (April, 2005), at http://slate.msn.com/id/2117243/, in which several different salts, including a Sicilian sea salt, were put to a blind test. The Sicilian sea salt rated highly but it was not the top overall choice of the testers.

Peter

Offline pizzanapoletana

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Re: Sicilian Sea Salt
« Reply #16 on: July 02, 2005, 02:22:45 PM »
Peter

Thanks very much for the spelling.

Talking about salt, I am not really concern with the taste when producing dough as it is irrelevant and what I am looking for is the dough development according to the salt used.

I do use Fleur de Sel (by Sel de Guérande) in salads and other preparation, but I do not see the point to use a £4.00 per 125g salt in dough making, when the Sicilian Sea Salt I use for that cost me 90p per 1kg.

Maldon is a chef thing and the flakes look amazing when sprinkled on the last minutes before the food is served.

Ciao

Offline Les

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Re: Sicilian Sea Salt
« Reply #17 on: July 02, 2005, 02:42:10 PM »
I read an interesting article this morning at the online Slate magazine (April, 2005), at http://slate.msn.com/id/2117243/, in which several different salts, including a Sicilian sea salt, were put to a blind test. The Sicilian sea salt rated highly but it was not the top overall choice of the testers.

Too bad they didn't include Real Salt in the taste test, I would be interested to see if anyone else agrees with my own experiment, where I found none of the other salts I tried (all sea salts) came close to Real Salt in flavor.   I think pizzanapoletana has a point about taste likely being irrelevant to making dough (or probably any cooked muliti-ingredient dish).  But it really does make a difference to things salted just before eating like cucumbers, tomatoes, popcorn, baked potatoes, etc.

Offline Sour_Jax

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Re: Sicilian Sea Salt
« Reply #18 on: July 02, 2005, 02:55:10 PM »
I and a few of my friends can concur. Real Salt is the absolute best salt there is.
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