Author Topic: My first NY pizza  (Read 9807 times)

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Offline JBJazz88

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Re: My first NY pizza
« Reply #20 on: January 24, 2006, 10:07:21 PM »
scott-r

Thanks for the info.
I am going to try the 6 in 1 tomatoes. I really want to know if it makes a difference in taste.
I can  use the 6 in 1 for other recipes.

Joe


Offline JBJazz88

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Re: My first NY pizza
« Reply #21 on: March 19, 2006, 06:53:31 AM »
Hi Pete and scot-r
I finally used the 6 in 1 tomatoes on my pizza, it really made a difference.
I frozed the left over sauce and used it again, the sauce did loose some flavor but it still had a good taste.



Joe

Offline JBJazz88

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Re: My first NY pizza
« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2007, 07:04:55 PM »
Hi Folks,
I have been busy with my Latin Jazz band and only been making
two pizza pies a month.
I have two questions for all the pizza makers on this site.
What bread closely relates in taste to the New York pizza dough and should it taste like one?

Joe
 

Online Pete-zza

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Re: My first NY pizza
« Reply #23 on: February 15, 2007, 07:47:39 PM »
Hi, Joe,

Good to see you break away from your music to check in on us.

I normally don't associate a pizza crust to bread, and certainly not a commercial supermarket bread, but if you were to omit the oil and sugar from the dough formulation, you may get close to an artisan bread flavor, such as you would get, for example, from a baguette. I once used a biga-like preferment with the Lehmann NY style dough and the crust had a baguette-like taste (see Reply 362 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg23239.html#msg23239). It was pleasant, and the crust had a baguette-like texture and quality, but it was not exactly the taste I was after. As you will see from this item, http://www.bakery-net.com/formula/7629/, the baker's percents for a baguette dough (overall formula) using a preferment (poolish) are similar to a fairly classic NY pizza dough. Naturally, the preparation of the dough is different than what is used to make a pizza dough. I would say that the more you use preferments in pizza dough formulas, the closer you are likely to get to the characteristics of artisan breads.

If you add a fair amount of sugar and fat to the dough, or milk or milk products, the resultant crust might be like an Italian bread crust, with a softer and more tender crumb.

Peter
« Last Edit: February 15, 2007, 07:57:42 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline JBJazz88

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Re: My first NY pizza
« Reply #24 on: February 17, 2007, 05:25:30 AM »
Hi Pete,
Thanks for the info.
I have not made  a pizza pie that incorporates a poolish.
Will a preferment improve the taste of the dough?
What is the purpose of a poolish?

Joe

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Re: My first NY pizza
« Reply #25 on: February 17, 2007, 09:37:02 AM »
Joe,

Technically, a poolish might be viewed as transitional between the sourdough process and a straight dough process using commercial yeast. Its benefit and value comes from the compounds, like alcohol and acids and esters, that are produced during the period of prefermentation and ultimately contribute to the flavor and aroma and texture of the finished crust. There are essentially three effects of the poolish on the dough into which it is incorporated. The first is that the acids produced during prefermentation strengthen the dough by tightening up the protein such that the gluten has higher elasticity. This effect suggests that one needs to be careful with the amount of poolish to use because too much acid can create an overly elastic dough. Second, the addition of the poolish to the dough lowers the pH. This has the effect of increasing the shelf life of the crust (or bread) by delaying the staling process and inhibiting mold growth. Obviously, this is rarely a concern with pizza, which is most often consumed rather quickly. Finally, the organic acids and other compounds contribute to the flavor and aroma and texture of the finished crust. The poolish is perhaps the favored approach for artisan bakers who make baguettes.

The downside to poolish, or any other preferment for that matter, is that it takes time to prepare and manage them. Out of necessity, commercial bakers have no choice. For home bakers, preferments may be inconvenient because they have to fit within one's work and/or home schedule and, hence, requires careful planning. However, I think they are a useful tool on one's arsenal of pizza making tools.

In terms of a NY style pizza dough, it is fairly straightforward to convert the dough formulation for that style, and others as well, to a poolish format. Of course, some experimentation may be required, but if one follows the more or less standard approach to preparing and managing a poolish, good results should follow.

Peter

Offline JBJazz88

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Re: My first NY pizza
« Reply #26 on: January 03, 2008, 06:21:29 AM »
Happy New Year to all.


Joe

Offline JerryMac

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Re: My first NY pizza
« Reply #27 on: January 06, 2008, 11:01:05 PM »
JBJazz88,

Great Lookin Pie,  :D

The little girls eyes tell it all  ;)

I'm a "Poolish" guy  >:D

Check out my "latest NY dough" recipe in this section  :)

Mangia Bene  :chef:
Jerry