Author Topic: Pizza Dough  (Read 1495 times)

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Offline brockp

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Pizza Dough
« on: October 21, 2011, 09:47:54 AM »
I have never made pizza before but rose at penn macs has giving me a lot of advise on good ingredients. I have bought a premed dough from her. My question is what is the most important thing i do with the dough when getting ready to prepare it as far as using flour and do I put oil on it before putting the sauce on it? Thanks for your help in advance.


Online scott123

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2011, 10:04:25 AM »
Brock, just to be clear, did you purchase a dough ball from Penn Mac or did you buy an already baked crust (also called a shell)?

Offline brockp

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2011, 10:11:52 AM »
Pizza crust for penn mac. Also will that be a very good crust?

Online scott123

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2011, 11:55:58 AM »
Brock, once bread leaves the oven, it immediately begins to stale.  This is why fresh baked bread is always better than old bread. This is also why fresh baked pizza is better than pizza made from a pre-baked crust.

When I was growing up, my family used to buy shells from a local Italian bakery.  That was the first pizza I ever ate.  They would bake the shells daily, so they'd be fresh and they'd brush them with olive oil to extend their shelf life a bit. This was, at the time, one of the best Italian bakeries on the planet, so the shells, being made from the same recipe as the bread, were top notch. My mother would top them with canned pasta sauce and brick mozzarella. It was quick and easy, tasted good, and I have many fond memories of it, but it wasn't really pizza.

Just top it with sauce and cheese and bake it on a cookie sheet until the cheese is melted.  It's just like making english muffin or bagel pizzas- you've done that, right?

In the future, if you want to try your hand at pizza, but don't want to make the dough, you'll achieve better results by purchasing a dough ball than a crust.  It will be more difficult, but the end result will be far superior.

Offline brockp

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2011, 04:51:05 PM »
Thank you very much for your help you are very kind.

Offline brockp

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2011, 08:02:25 AM »
Scott 123 I took your advice and went out last night and bought a case of dough balls at sams club. I have two of them sitting on my counter thawing out for my first attempt today around lunch. After they thaw out can you give me a little step by step as to what to do as far as how much and what kind of flour and how long i should let them sit out and rise.

Online scott123

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2011, 11:31:24 AM »
Brock, when most people purchase dough balls, they buy them thawed, from the refrigerator case.  This allows you to let the dough sit out for an hour or two and then form and bake. Frozen balls complicate things a bit. Are there any directions on the packaging?  I might let them thaw in the fridge overnight first and then take them out to warm up a bit and bake.

Here's how you form dough.  Ignore the the part about the rolling pin.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjYqw1CLZsA" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjYqw1CLZsA</a>


If you've only got flour for forming the pizza, go with that.  Any kind of flour will be fine- smell it first, and make sure it's not too old, if it's been sitting around a while for more than a month or too.

Tell me about your oven.  Gas? Electric? If it's gas, does it have a broiler burner in the main oven compartment or is there a separate compartment below for broiling? What is the oven's peak temp? Do you have a pizza stone and a peel or a pizza pan? If you have a stone, what kind is it and what are it's dimensions? If it's a pan, how big is it?

Dough is ready to use when it's doubled in volume from it's original size and is puffy and airy. Since you didn't make the dough and don't know it's original size, you basically have to guess.  Most pre-made doughs that I see in the refrigerator case have plenty of bubbles formed (sometimes too many), so I think it's generally a safe bet to take it out of the fridge, let it warm up for an hour or two and then bake it and not really worry about fermenting it longer or being too concerned with volume.

One thing I should make you aware of is that the odds of this pizza being a success (or even being edible) are astronomically low.  I couldn't eat my first home baked pizza and I'm sure many members here have similar stories to tell.  The road to good (and great) home baked pizza is a journey.  It took me 20 years (on my own) to reach pizza nirvana.  Thankfully, you have us, so it shouldn't take you much time at all. Theoretically, with some conscientious time and effort, you can be making good pizza in a couple weeks.  But, be prepared for a few losses before you start getting wins.

I'm curious, how much was the case of dough balls from Sam's Club?
« Last Edit: October 22, 2011, 11:33:18 AM by scott123 »

Offline Kostakis1985

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2011, 11:50:57 AM »
Brock,

If you have access to the penn mac store you should buy one of those 3 lb bags of hi gluten flour they sell possibly the generel mills all trumps and make the dough yourself you can make excellent dough using only flour salt yeast and water. It'll be 100x better than dough balls you buy made already. I found whenever i purchase dough balls from a store i have to reball them because they take on an odd shape then they are to stiff to strech and my pizza has a generic taste and looks bad. Its totally worth the effort to make it yourself you just have to plan it out.
Jamie

Offline brockp

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2011, 12:23:10 PM »
I paid $16.00 for a box of twenty frozen dough balls individually wrapped in plastic. For my oven it is electric and will get up to about 550 degrees I bought a pizza stone from penn macs it is made by "old stone oven" 16 inches and 1/4 inch high. I bought my peel form "Bed bath and beyond" and I can tell it's very cheaply made.

Offline brockp

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #9 on: October 22, 2011, 12:25:10 PM »
Hey Kostakis, Do you reccomend any certain type of yeast?


Online scott123

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #10 on: October 22, 2011, 12:41:45 PM »
Brock, any chance you can bring the stone back?  From what I can tell, Pizzeria Bono is NY style pizza, and, in order to bake that correctly, you want a better stone than that. Also, any chance you can bring the peel back as well? If memory serves me correctly, those BB&B peels are clunky, small and hard to work with. I took a look at Penn Macs peels- those aren't great either. If you think there's any chance that you will ever make pizza for friends and family, you want a peel that accommodate a 16" pizza.

Here's the yeast you want:

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Fleischmann-s-Yeast-Bread-Machine-4-oz/10306744

This is also called 'Instant Dry Yeast' or, around here IDY.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2011, 12:47:21 PM by scott123 »

Offline brockp

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2011, 12:45:46 PM »
I got the stone from penn macs too. What kind would you recommend and where do you get a good pizza peel?

Online scott123

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #12 on: October 22, 2011, 12:57:14 PM »
The only pizza stone that can guarantee pizzeria Bono results (and better) is 1/2" steel plate.  17 x 17 x 1/2" (or 18 x 18 x 1/2" if your oven can accommodate it).  Being near Pittsburgh, you should have no problem finding steel  ;D Just look in the yellow pages under metal.

Since most ovens are wider than they are deep, you'll want to buy a square plate and use the gap between the side walls for air flow.  You basically want to size the stone so that it's almost touching the back wall and door. When you're launching a pizza from a peel, every extra fraction of an inch of real estate helps.  You'll want to measure this space carefully.  Many members, myself included, have bought stones and thought the measurements were perfect, only to bring them home and not have the door quite close. This is why I recommend making a dummy out of cardboard.

For NY style, the only peel that I have used and recommend is the American Metalcraft 18" wood peel:

http://www.wasserstrom.com/restaurant-supplies-equipment/Product_106935

I'm not sure where you can find this locally, but this is the one to find. To be honest, I'm kind of amazed that Penn Macs doesn't sell this peel.


Offline DocSpine

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #13 on: October 22, 2011, 09:52:00 PM »
its just a 4 hour road trip to Dayton Ohio and pick it up at their  retail store

Offline brockp

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #14 on: October 25, 2011, 10:13:42 AM »
Does anybody have a good dough recipe for a rookie?

Online scott123

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Re: Pizza Dough
« Reply #15 on: October 25, 2011, 01:39:12 PM »
Brock, the recipe all boils down to the type of flour that you're using. Kostakis's suggestion to get flour from Penn Mac is a good one.  If you're open to getting bromated All Trumps (AT) from Penn Mac and a bag of all purpose (AP) from the supermarket (Walmart sells a decent AP), then I'll post a good NY style recipe using an AT/AP blend.

Also, do you have a digital scale?  If you're getting into pizzamaking, that's pretty much the first thing you need- for weighing out the floor, so that you can achieve consistent results.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2011, 01:54:22 PM by scott123 »