Author Topic: Finally some NP pies  (Read 21414 times)

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Online TXCraig1

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #25 on: December 02, 2011, 10:11:42 AM »
1. Do the Brussels Sprouts taste bitter with the char? Are the leaves moistened with water or coated with oil before you dress the pizza?

Barry,

Brussels sprouts are awesome on a pie. I've been using them for some time at home and love them. You don't need to moisten them. Just core them out and peel off the outer leaves. Place them on the pie whole, or if they are really big, maybe tear them in half. I usually put a swirl of evoo on the pie before baking. The char on the sprouts is a critical part of the pie. It's not "bitter" at all in the bad sense (assuming you burn them to a crisp anyway). Rather there is a little bitterness that in a very good way balances out the richness of the cheese. There is no tomato sauce, so there is really no acid on the pie to do this. Cooked perfectly, like Marlon's are, they also add a subtle smokiness that is just awesome.

I've been doing the pie with applewood smoked bacon, but the Brussels sprout pie I had at Motorino this week with pancetta was incredible. Next time I'm suing pancetta for sure, though I bet guanciale is great too.

CL
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Offline pizza dr

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #26 on: December 02, 2011, 12:11:30 PM »
Marlon

How many pies do you cook at once?  I'm with John on the multi pie shots, I don't know how you keep from eating a bite before you start the next pie ;D

Scot

Offline bakeshack

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #27 on: December 02, 2011, 01:32:49 PM »
Thank you everyone for the kind words!  I get inspired by you guys all the time.

I baked 2 pies at a time so I was able to finish the 5 pies in about 8-10 mins. It was crazy because it was just me, my wife and my brother.  My 4-yr old, actually, ate the 1st pie so it was not in the picture.  It was a ham & cheese pie (smoked ham, gruyere, mozzarella). 

Barry, the black truffle cream was made with canned black truffles, truffle oil, black truffle juice (from the can) pulsed in a food processor.  You can also buy the cream bottled already.  I just made mine with some leftovers from the can. 

I totally agree with Craig on the Brussels sprouts.  I did not dress them with oil.  It imparts a certain smokiness as well.

Marlon

Offline Barry

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #28 on: December 03, 2011, 03:12:52 AM »
Hi Marlon and CL.

Thank you for your replies to my questions - much appreciated!

I am going to attempt the Brussels Sprout & Pancetta pie this week end. I am also attempting a pie with a "truffle" spread with mushrooms and prosciutto.The "truffle" spread will be made of chick peas blended with truffle oil, truffle salt and cream. Hope it works!

Kind regards.

Barry in Cape Town

Offline bakeshack

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #29 on: January 12, 2012, 07:01:32 PM »
So with all the talk about the home oven NP pies, I decided to give it a try last night once again.  Dough was mixed as follows:

San Felice STG 100%
Water 61%
Culture 2%
Salt 2.8%

Flour, water, and culture mixed, autolyse for 25 mins, added the salt after autolyse.  S&F (about 3 full turns), rest for 10 mins, 2 more S & F session with 10 mins rest in between.  Bulk ferment 24 hrs, balled, final rise 24 hrs. 

I made a 2nd batch (while 1st batch was on autolyse), same method, bulk ferment for 2 hrs, balled, final rise 48 hrs and will be baked tonight. 

The 1st batch fermented much faster compared to the 2nd batch as shown in the pics below (1st batch on top of the picture).

The oven was preheated for 1 hr at max temp, stone was 6 inches away from broiler and at 560F during this time.  I inserted the probe blanket and ran the broiler for 25 mins.  The stone came up to temp of 790F before I started baking.  Bake time was about 70-80 secs with the broiler running the whole time.  I did 2-3 turns before I pulled out the pie.  I was quite happy with the texture and color, very similar to my pies baked in the WFO. 

1)  Clam pie - Fresh manila clams, preserved meyer lemon, reduced juice from the clam, white wine, butter, creme fraiche, parsley, chili oil for drizzling
2)  VT smoked pepperoni, black olives.







Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #30 on: January 12, 2012, 07:13:27 PM »
Two outstanding pies - I love the toppings. Pretty amazing that they came from a home oven. I am also surprised to see that much of a difference in fermentation volume just from reducing the bulk time.

John

Offline johnamus

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #31 on: January 12, 2012, 08:12:26 PM »
Beautiful pies! I love the great leoparding, especially considering they baked in your home oven.  Thanks for posting your formula and workflow.

A few questions if you don't mind: What type of material is your probe blanket made out of?  Is your broiler an electric element? What thickness factor did you use?
« Last Edit: January 12, 2012, 08:27:20 PM by johnamus »

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #32 on: January 12, 2012, 08:27:52 PM »
Beautiful. I'd love to try that clam pie - well, both actually, but especially the clam pie.

CL
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline salvatoregianpaolo

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #33 on: January 12, 2012, 08:43:55 PM »
Marlon,

I'd love to see a picture of your setup.  That's pretty incredible to get that high a temperature from the broiler, especially from a distance of 6".  I've always known my broiler to be weak, but holy cow, that thing you have is a beast!  What make is your oven, and what type of stone are you using?

Grazie,
Salvatore


Online Jackie Tran

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #34 on: January 12, 2012, 09:06:17 PM »
Nice Job Marlon.  Let us know which pies and from which batch of dough you preferred and why.   I predict batch A made the better pies. 

Thanks,
Chau

Offline bakeshack

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #35 on: January 12, 2012, 09:50:00 PM »
Thanks guys for the kind words!  The clam pie is a new favorite.  I love it.  I have to admit that the oven got really hot (scary hot ???) so I'm not sure if I want to do that again.   ;D  I usually get it up to 700F only on the stone.  I tried to heat longer and I got 790F on the stone. 

I have an electric Thermador double oven but I used the bottom oven for easier access.  The stone is a 1/2 inch 14x16 stone from Williams Sonoma.  It's not the best but works for me especially with breads. 

I was also quite surprised with the elevated fermentation on the 1st batch.  I'm thinking the 2nd batch method would work very well during hot weather.  I remember I had quite a few problems with my dough last summer.

Here is a pic of the broiler and the stone as well as the homemade probe.  I got the idea on the probe from previous thread as well.  However, I could not locate the thread where I saw this done by one of the members.

I will provide some updates on the difference in quality as soon as I bake the 2nd batch later tonight.

Marlon




Offline salvatoregianpaolo

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #36 on: January 12, 2012, 10:04:57 PM »
I knew electric broilers were more powerful than gas, but the difference is remarkable!  My broiler can't even come close to that, and I've had the stone stituated less than 2" from the element.  Fantastic.

Sognando di un nuovo forno,
Salvatore

Offline johnamus

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #37 on: January 12, 2012, 10:23:11 PM »
That's a serious broiler, 10 pass 3500 watts :o?  <jealous>

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #38 on: January 14, 2012, 03:53:32 AM »
So with all the talk about the home oven NP pies, I decided to give it a try last night once again.  Dough was mixed as follows. . . .

Great results, thank you!
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline bakeshack

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #39 on: February 01, 2012, 02:25:15 AM »
So, tonight I wanted to test my skills by trying to bake 3 pies at a time.  I preheated the oven for 4 hrs and got the temp up to 925F on the oven floor.  I removed as much coals as I could to create more room and kept the fire going so the flames were covering at least 2/3 of the dome. 

I did a 64% HD dough, 2% culture, 2.8% salt using San Felice STG - 19 hrs bulk / 8 hrs balled at 65F.  I figured the higher hydration would give me some time inside the oven just in case I encounter some issues during the bake and loading.  Bake times were between 50-60 secs max.  I was able to finish the 6 pies in less than 15 mins.  I got a little sloppy on the opening of the dough and it was quite stressful loading the pies and wondering if the 1st pie was burning already but, somehow, I managed not to burn them.    :-D

The 64% dough turned out to be not as tender as my 60% (just like what Craig found out last week or so).  There was a little bit of chew to the cornicione unlike my previous pies at 60%, which were completely tender with a very slight crisp on the outside.  With the shorter bake times, I assumed that the dough will be much tender/softer but that was not the case tonight.  The outer shell on the cornicione which normally has a very slight crisp on my 60% right out of the oven, turned out a little bit on the tough side (not leathery tough).  I'm not sure why but I'm thinking the shorter bake time, higher hydration, and also the shorter bulk fermentation led to this.  Next time, I will try to do this with my 60% dough and see if I get a different result.

Here are some pics from tonight. 

Marlon




Online TXCraig1

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #40 on: February 01, 2012, 09:51:52 AM »
All those pies are all drop dead gorgeous Marlon. I really like the filetti.

What are the toppings on the top left and right pies?

CL
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Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #41 on: February 01, 2012, 10:12:36 AM »
Bravo Marlon. One of the first times I have seen someone on the forum attempt 3 pies at once. Do you think that in your hurried state you were a little hard on the dough? I have noticed that even the best of doughs get a little tough when they are handled roughly.

John


Offline bakeshack

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #42 on: February 01, 2012, 10:55:51 AM »
Thank you Craig and John!  Looking back, I was definitely not as gentle with the dough during the stretch and slap.  It was more of a pull and tug.  :-D   It was quite fun though taking 3 pies out of the oven for the guests to eat immediately.  I can certainly understand how a pizzeria can come up with inconsistent pies especially during peak times. 

The pie on the top left was an Amatriciana with tomato, guanciale, red onion, and chili flakes.  The one on the right was a test Korean pie with ssamjang (hot soybean paste) mixed 50/50 with my tomato sauce, marinated pork belly (Korean-style), green onion, and finished with radish kimchi.  These were leftovers from the grill last Monday and I thought it would be fun to try and we loved it.  It needs some tweaking so I will do it again. I won't add the tomato sauce into the base.  I will just thin out the ssamjang with a little bit of water instead to get its pure flavor in the pie. 

Marlon

Offline pizza dr

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #43 on: February 02, 2012, 11:42:23 AM »
Marlon if I had to use one word to describe your pizzas... the word "rustic" comes to mind... and I mean it in the most complimentary way!

One question though... the last batch didn't seem to have as much leoparding as some of your previous batches?  True or is it just the pics?  If so... what do you attribute it to?  shortened bulk fermentation? 

Thanks

Scot

Offline bakeshack

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #44 on: February 02, 2012, 03:56:33 PM »
Scot, thank you for the compliment! 

I think the leoparding spots were much smaller compared to my previous pies and I noticed that the cornicione were more brown than usual.  I would usually see the area around the leoparding to be lighter in color (more white) but this last bake was a bit darker.  I was trying to go for the smaller leoparding spots with a more even browning around it (see link below for pic) and not the extreme contrast of black spots with a light-colored cornicione. 

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=3087.0

I figured a shorter bulk rise and using the dough a bit early than usual might do the trick together with a much hotter oven.  I think I had some success although I would probably get a better idea if I bake them next time without rushing too much trying to bake 3 pies at once and pay more attention to each pie. 

Marlon

Offline pizza dr

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #45 on: February 02, 2012, 06:57:08 PM »
Thats funny you mention that.  

A couple of weeks ago I made some pies that were bulk fermented for about 24 hours and balled for 4.  They cooked up fairly nice.  Five days go by and I noticed that I had a couple of dough balls hanging around in the wine fridge ( about 60 degrees).  I just cooked some chicken in the WFO so I decided to throw one in for giggles.  It was an overblown mess but I managed to get it off the peel OK.  What I noticed was the most extreme "black on white" leoparding I have ever done.  I decided to sprinkle a little parm on it and give it a try.  If I'm being honest, the crust really wasn't all that good... kind of "bready".  But the spots were striking at least.   :-\

Scot
« Last Edit: February 02, 2012, 07:32:13 PM by pizza dr »

Offline bakeshack

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #46 on: February 02, 2012, 08:25:44 PM »
Scot, that pie looks exactly what I was describing.  It reminds me of the cornicione of Paulie Gee's pies.  I love the extreme contrast with the blisters and the cornicione but, with my last bake, I was going for something different. 

So, the extremely long fermentation is the key to that look.  Do you think the cold fermentation contributed to that effect as well?  Would you say that the dough was already past its prime when you baked it?  If it was, the overfermentation possibly contributed to the "bready" texture. 

Thanks.

Marlon




Online Jackie Tran

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #47 on: February 02, 2012, 08:41:45 PM »
Love that leoparded look Scott.  You should post more of your pies.   ;)  Scott, you didn't at anytime reball these did you?  They had the same 4 hour ball as the others but then back into the fridge for another 5 days?

Chau
« Last Edit: February 02, 2012, 09:14:11 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline pizza dr

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #48 on: February 02, 2012, 09:11:04 PM »
Marlon

The dough was definitely over-fermented ( at least by what I'm used to working with).  It almost looked like one of my starters that had just been fed except with larger bubbles instead of the tiny ones I'm used to seeing with my starter.    I must also mention that I did not let it come to room temp before I formed the skin.  I had a lot of bench flour ( necessary for me to even work with it) and was pretty rough  with it ( I wasn't planning on serving it to anyone).   I think the handling of the dough more than anything was the reason for the bready nature of it.  I think if I allowed the dough to come up to room temp and handled it with care I could have had something better as far as the crust goes. 

Scot


Offline pizza dr

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #49 on: February 02, 2012, 09:13:21 PM »
Thanks Chau

I didn't want to embarrass myself.  But I"m getting a little more consistent. 

Scot