Author Topic: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust  (Read 25262 times)

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Offline Randy

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KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« on: July 13, 2005, 06:59:44 PM »
I thought I would try Steve's food processor directions for DKM's cracker crust recipe but modify it to use with a kitchenAid mixer and the paddle blade instead of the dough hook.  I measured all the dry ingredients including the yeast and put them into the mixer bowl.  With the machine on stir using the paddle blade I let it run while I measured the 5.8 oz of 90 deg water.  To the water I add the .6 oz of oil.  I then poured that very slowly into the mixer bowl while it ran on stir.  By pouring the water-oil mixture in slow you end up with the cornmeal like texture.  I let it run for 10 minutes on stir again still using the paddle.  It looked real good and very close to the pictures Steve posted.
Next time I think I will try speed 2 just to see what happens.
It is resting on the counter for 24 hours.

Randy


Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2005, 07:56:12 PM »
The flavor was excelant but i was disappointed that I did not get the puffy edges.  In every regard it was flat but it was crispy.  I think the procedure is good but something was not right.  The dough looked a perfect match to the pictures Steve posted.

I will try this again but next time the yeast will go in the water.

Randy

Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2005, 09:32:56 PM »
I made another crust and it came out great.  This time I mixed the yeast with the water then added the oil to the water.  Then with the mixer on stir still using the paddle I let it run for 5 min.  Had the big crisp bubbles in the crust and everything.
I went to 5.9oz of water.  I parbaked for 5 min at 475F then finished the pizza cooking it for another 10 min at 475.  It looked just like Steve"s pictures under the DKM thin crust post.

Randy

Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2005, 12:18:44 PM »
Here is my latest version trying AP flour and Crisco zero trans fat.  I also increased the water one-tenth once and tried a teaspoon of honey.  This was a great pizza and rolled out much easier than the last.  But the bread flour version tasted better.  Adding the Crisco or oil to the flour before the water may help preventing gluten and therefore make it easier to roll out.  Using the paddle I believe is making a better pizza as compared to the dough hook.  Here is my latest version.

Randy’s Thin Crust using paddle attachment
Based on DKM’s thin crust recipe
Friday, July 29, 2005


5.9 oz. warm water(90F)
1 ½  teaspoons instant yeast
1 pound Unbleached Bread flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon honey
1 tablespoon plus 1/2 teaspoon Crisco

Measure the flour sugar and salt.  Place the mixture in the mixing bowl then add the Crisco.  Measure the warm water and add the honey and yeast to the water.  Let mixture stand as the mixer runs for the next step.  Run mixer on stir with the paddle attachment for 5 min. With the mixer still running on stir speed pour the water, honey yeast mixture into the bowl very slowly.  After adding the water mixture run the mixer on stir speed for an additional 5 minutes. Remove from bowl and squeeze together to make a ball.  Place in sealed bowl and leave on counter top overnight but 24 hours is better.


Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2005, 07:11:42 PM »
Here is a picture of the dough ball.  Well Almost you have to squeeze together into a ball.  About the most interesting recipe on the site.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2005, 04:43:14 PM by Randy »

Offline DKM

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2005, 10:59:00 AM »
That's a little too dry.

DKM
I'm on too many of these boards

Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2005, 12:38:21 PM »
You would think so but using the paddle and pouring the liquid in slowly produces a more uniform mixture making it look drier than it is.  Steve's thin crust using a food processor looks the same only finer.  With a little squeezing it makes a nice ball.

Randy

Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #7 on: August 11, 2005, 10:04:33 AM »
Here is the version I am trying tonight.  I have decided the honey added little to the flavor so I have went to two yeaspoons raw sugar or Turbindo sugar.  I also increased the Crisco by a half teaspoon  out of convince since I already had a teaspoon out for the sugar and salt.  My recipe differs from Steve and DKM's since I put the Crisco in first without the water and run the mixer with the paddle attachment on speed 2.  The idea is to coat the flour to reduce some of the gluten formation.
Randy’s Thin Crust Experimental
Based on DKM’s thin crust recipe
Wednesday, August 10, 2005


5.9 oz. warm water(90F)  With a pinch of sugar
1 ½  teaspoons instant yeast
1 pound Unbleached Bread flour
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoon raw sugar
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon Crisco

Measure the flour sugar and salt.  Place the mixture in the mixing bowl then add the Crisco.  Measure the warm water and add the pinch of sugar and yeastthen stir.  Let mixture stand as the mixer runs for the next step.  Run mixer on speed 2 with the paddle attachment for 5 min. Switch to speed 1 or stir speed then pour the water, yeast mixture into the bowl very slowly.  After adding the water mixture run the mixer on stir speed for an additional 5 minutes. Remove from bowl and squeeze together to make a ball.  Place in sealed bowl and leave on counter top overnight but 24 hours is better.

Roll out dough to about 20" in diameter.  Place on 16" then use the roller to cut off excess dough.  Use a fork or docker to prick holes randomly on the bottom of the pan.  Before putting the toppings on, place the crust in a 475F oven on the middle rack for 5 minutes.  Remove and add toppins.  Place back in the oven this time use the bottom shelf.  Bake for 8 minutes then check.  If you want turn the pizza around at the 4 minute mark for even browning.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2005, 02:15:43 PM by Randy »

Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2005, 02:06:35 PM »
Here is the results and it was excelant.  The extra teaspoon of sugar helped with the browing which I like.  I added a few more directions to the recipe above since I first posted it.  I think I am going to stay with the 5.9 oz of water because I thought was a little easier to roil out.

Randy
« Last Edit: August 12, 2005, 02:18:54 PM by Randy »

Offline Steeb

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #9 on: August 12, 2005, 07:00:16 PM »
Looks great! How did the bottom of the crust turn out? Was it still nice and crispy? I may have to try the whole "middle rack, then bottom rack" trick next time.


Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #10 on: August 12, 2005, 07:50:11 PM »
The bottom of the crust was my best yet.  It was crispiest cracker so far having a nice crunch when it was cut.  It could be that the 5 minute par bake using the bottom shelf would work but it seems like the middle shelf for the parbake gives me better results.  Steve did a 4 min at 500 deg and I did mine at 475 for 5 min.  One advantage of the longer par bake is the finshed pizza doesn't have the crusty brown cheese but some might prefer brown cheese.
I think I am going to stick with this recipe until someone comes up with a better way.  However I do want to try the recipe using Classico olive oil instead of the zero trans fat Crisco.  DKM's thin crust knocked Chicago out of the number two postion.

Offline Steeb

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #11 on: August 14, 2005, 03:32:22 AM »
I noticed you substituted IDY for ADY. Did you use SAF Perfect Rise or a different style? Also, did you notice a discernable difference between the IDY and the ADY?

I actually have a batch on my counter right now - it's your version using SAF Perfect Rise for the IDY. I'm going to copy your 475F temp and the middle rack/bottom rack technique. We'll see what happens tomorrow.

Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #12 on: August 14, 2005, 08:57:59 AM »
The use of IDY in this case is a matter of convenience.  I don't keep ADY around the house because it is a lower performer than the more modern instant yeast and IDY can replace ADY in any recipe.  I keep a jar of bread machine yeast which is an instant yeast in the refrigerator for less than I packet recipes like this thin crust but then again it is out of connivance.  Using SAF yeast is just fine.  I prefer SAF yeast as you know on my American style but the bread yeast works great   Glad your trying the middle rack/ lower rack method to see if it makes a difference to you.  It sure seems like it works better but if you said it didn't make a difference I sure not argue.  Post pictures if you can.

Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #13 on: August 23, 2005, 11:06:14 AM »
By the way don't throw the excess dough away.  Simply roll it back out and use a biscuit cutter to cut out little pizzas perfect for a pepperoni, a dab of sauce, and cheese and you don't have to dock or parbake them.  Making another batch of DKM's modified Thin crust today.

Randy

Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #14 on: August 25, 2005, 10:48:41 AM »
I made this recipe again and it came out perfect again.  Because of time problems I put the dough in the cooler for about 8 hours,straight from the mixer  then that evening when I got home I placed the dough in the Saran wrapped bowl on the counter for supper the following day.

I like this way of mixing Crisco into the flour so much I am going to try it on a pie crust.

Randy

Offline Steeb

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #15 on: August 26, 2005, 02:05:04 AM »
Haven't had a chance to post recently... I made the pizza back on the 15th and it turned out pretty well using the middle rack/bottom rack method. Unfortunately, I was still unable to get the center of the pizza's crust crispy without putting it on a stone for a couple of minutes. Maybe I'll try the middle rack/lower rack trick at 500 next time...

Offline vbkeller

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #16 on: January 05, 2006, 11:43:30 AM »
I am brand new here----and I am looking for a Ledo like crust and I am ready to try this cracker crust---have you tried it with o;ive oil yet?   

Offline chiguy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #17 on: January 07, 2006, 12:10:26 AM »
 Hi abkeller,
 Wecolme to the forum, i have not tried this recipe. The problem i have with this recipe(Randy's) is the very low hydration/water,about 40%. A acceptable hydration/water range for pizza crust is 45-65%. I understand they can probably makes a pizza with this recipe but a dough should never look that dry. I can almost stamp a guarantee that Ledo's uses a hydration somewhere in the range i mentioned. There are other members on this site that fancy Ledo's, although i have never seen anyone yet post a recipe. I am not telling you  not to try the recipe, you may really enjoy it. If you are trying to emulate a recipe(ledos) without knowing more about it,ie. flour type, it can be a real challenge.  Goodluck,  Chiguy

Online Pete-zza

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #18 on: January 07, 2006, 12:31:21 AM »
I'm no expert on thin, cracker-type crusts, but the two DKM thin crust recipes on the recipes page of this forum have hydration percents of 36% and around 38-39% (by my estimation). Since the recipes are on the recipe page, I assume the results must be pretty good.

Peter

Offline chiguy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #19 on: January 07, 2006, 01:03:56 AM »
 Hi Peter,
 At 36% hydration that is a pie crust in my opinion.
. Remove from bowl and squeeze together to make a ball. 
I know you may not claim to be a cracker crust/thin expert, but i am sure you would agree that a professional pizza operation like Ledos or anyone else will not squeeze flour/ingrediants together to make dough. I suggested that vbkeller try the recipe, but if he were trying emulate Ledo's crust he should probably stick to professional standard hydration.   Chiguy