Author Topic: Sue Bee honey ain't honey ?  (Read 138 times)

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Offline Jet_deck

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Sue Bee honey ain't honey ?
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2011, 05:43:16 PM »
I always buy local honey.
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Sue Bee honey ain't honey ?
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2011, 05:56:45 PM »
Gene,

Norma brought this matter to our attention recently at Reply 654 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3940.msg159501.html#msg159501. In Texas, one of the biggest packers of honey is Burleson's. According to a comment in the article that you and Norma mentioned, Burleson's honey has the pollen. While I was at the market recently, in addition to the Burleson's honeys, I saw a comparable one from a North Dallas beekeeper. It was almost $15 for a 24-ounce bottle. I bought a 24-ounce bottle of a house brand (Fiesta) for just under $5. No doubt, it is not "real" honey according to the FDA regs.

Peter

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Sue Bee honey ain't honey ?
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2011, 06:12:04 PM »
It looks as though Sue Bee Honey says on their facebook page that pollen (or lack their of) is not a food safety issue...
« Last Edit: November 14, 2011, 06:16:44 PM by Jet_deck »
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Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Sue Bee honey ain't honey ?
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2011, 01:16:31 PM »
I'm checking out at the tool store yesterday, and there is a quart Mason jar of local honey.  I mention to the guy that has the bees, about this article.  He says "I can tell you exactly what they do and why". 


Mass honey producers buy alot of honey (from different honey farms).  Bees are not like cattle or pigs, you really can't control their diet.  So as a large honey conglomerate you have all different kinds of honey coming in and this presents a problem.

The procedure is to heat the honey, filter it, add flavorings/coloring and sweetness (if necessary), then bottle it.  I asked why they would go to this added expense/trouble.  I should have known what the answer was.  Just like commisary produced pizza dough, they are looking to sell a product that is uniform in color, taste and consistency.  Their honey today is the same as it was last year/ 10 years /20 years ago.

The tool guys' honey still has the pollen floating on the top and is minimally filtered.  I should get a jar for the new house.
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Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Sue Bee honey ain't honey ?
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2011, 02:06:04 PM »
I agree Craig. I cannot remember the last time I did not buy locally made honey.

What is interesting is some local farms selling "single variety" honeys. A friend of mine drove 90 minutes each way to visit a honey maker selling single variety "Blueberry Honey". He bought it to make mead. I scratched my head a little.

My question is I don't care if you have bee-hives in the middle of one big-arse field of blueberries. Maybe it is my ignorance with regards to the typical distance bees travel from a hive to look for food, but unless the field were just titanic and/or you had some type of escape proof dome over the field of blueberries, how do you know the bees aren't having happy hour over at the neighboring (insert flowering plant/tree here) and making honey from that in addition to the blueberries? --K
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Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: Sue Bee honey ain't honey ?
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2011, 04:04:51 PM »
This is a nice read http://www.beesource.com/point-of-view/joe-traynor/how-far-do-bees-fly-one-mile-two-seven-and-why/. I didn't know they could go up to 7 miles to get pollen but the further they go the less they can bring back. I thought all pollen was the same from one plant to another but I guess not. One of the things in the article said

"Bees placed on alfalfa seed pollination will travel great distances to get pollen rather than work alfalfa flowers for pollen(2). In an extensive test in the 1980′s, David Chaney (U. C., Davis) found that bees placed for alfalfa pollination collected 10 times as much safflower pollen as alfalfa pollen even though the nearest safflower field was five miles away!(3) a distance greater than the breadth of Celine Dionís ego!(4)." The last sentence made me laugh.


 

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