Author Topic: Working with whole grains (including the Ultragrain flour)  (Read 1446 times)

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Offline norma427

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Working with whole grains (including the Ultragrain flour)
« on: January 11, 2012, 09:29:04 PM »
 
ConAgra Foods provides insights into the practical matters of whole grains and working with them. What kinds of issues do formulators run into when working with whole grains? How are these usually resolved? Which is more important: texture or taste?

While scientists find more evidence of the beneficial effects of whole grains on heart health and weight control, formulators must consider the practical aspects of making whole grain foods appealing to consumers. The healthy halo that consumers associate with whole grains extends as well to bakery results. In the first of this exclusive series, Elizabeth Arndt, PhD, director of R&D, ConAgra Foods, Inc., Omaha, NE, offers her advice to readers of Baking & Snack’s new Formulations Update.

http://www.bakingbusiness.com/News/News%20Home/Features/2012/1/Working%20with%20whole%20grains%20part%201.aspx

and

http://www.conagramills.com/media/ConAgraMillsFactSheet.pdf

Norma
« Last Edit: January 11, 2012, 09:30:37 PM by norma427 »
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Offline 1976Pianoman

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Re: Working with whole grains (including the Ultragrain flour)
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2012, 02:21:44 PM »
WOW!! THANK YOU for posting this!!  ..and now it makes complete sense!  My Ultratrain pizza trial #1 which I mentioned in a previous post failed, and this bakingbusiness.com article mentioned the same problems I ran into.  The dough was under-hydrated and the texture was wrong because I clearly over kneaded it.   So that explains the texture issues. Still, the flavor wasn't good - too "healthy".  So hopefully today's trial with a 50/50 Ultragrain and bread flour blend will be an improvement.  :)


Offline sailorjazz

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Re: Working with whole grains (including the Ultragrain flour)
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2012, 09:54:39 AM »
Most baking resources I have suggest limiting whole grain to 20% of total dough. I have 3 recipes that have worked for me and gotten good feedback from family and friends. Whole wheat whole grain flour mixed with a high gluten flour works well. You may also add semolina if you prefer.

Offline norma427

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Re: Working with whole grains (including the Ultragrain flour)
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2012, 10:18:25 AM »
Most baking resources I have suggest limiting whole grain to 20% of total dough. I have 3 recipes that have worked for me and gotten good feedback from family and friends. Whole wheat whole grain flour mixed with a high gluten flour works well. You may also add semolina if you prefer.


sailorjazz,

Thanks for posting that your baking resources suggest that whole grain only be 20% of the total dough and what combination your have worked with.

I also am recently trying out a 3 flour combination blend with the Ultragrain flour with decent results.

Norma
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Offline 1976Pianoman

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Re: Working with whole grains (including the Ultragrain flour)
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2012, 11:56:52 AM »
You can do 50% Ultragrain and still get a very nice crust that is almost indistinguishable to a regular crust.  Always mix with high gluten flour or even better would be Tipo 00 pizza flour.  To keep the Ultragrain at 20% is just not worth it.  It's just not enough whole grain to make the crust healthy - if making a healthy crust is your goal.  I understand that ConAgra advises a 30%/70% ratio (not 20%), yet this is a starting point to introduce customers who are used to eating Wonderbread type white breads.  The flavor and texture difference at 30% is indeed exactly the same as 100% white, yet the difference with 50% is so minuscule that I assure you it won't be a problem and may even inspire you to push it to 60%.  :)

Here is a link to my first (failed) Ultragrain trial.  Read the 'Update' at the very end for a important note regarding the two types of Ultragrain flour.

https://www.facebook.com/notes/casa-robles-kitchen/ultragrain-pizza-trial-1/319040508159471

Here is my second Ultragrain trial using a 50/50 blend:

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.320944607969061.75590.131547070242150&type=1

Offline norma427

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Re: Working with whole grains (including the Ultragrain flour)
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2012, 03:02:46 PM »
You can do 50% Ultragrain and still get a very nice crust that is almost indistinguishable to a regular crust.  Always mix with high gluten flour or even better would be Tipo 00 pizza flour.  To keep the Ultragrain at 20% is just not worth it.  It's just not enough whole grain to make the crust healthy - if making a healthy crust is your goal.  I understand that ConAgra advises a 30%/70% ratio (not 20%), yet this is a starting point to introduce customers who are used to eating Wonderbread type white breads.  The flavor and texture difference at 30% is indeed exactly the same as 100% white, yet the difference with 50% is so minuscule that I assure you it won't be a problem and may even inspire you to push it to 60%.  :)

Here is a link to my first (failed) Ultragrain trial.  Read the 'Update' at the very end for a important note regarding the two types of Ultragrain flour.

https://www.facebook.com/notes/casa-robles-kitchen/ultragrain-pizza-trial-1/319040508159471

Here is my second Ultragrain trial using a 50/50 blend:

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.320944607969061.75590.131547070242150&type=1

1976Pianoman,

Thanks for posting your results and your notes about what ConAgra advises about using Ultragrain flour.  Your pizza with the 50/50 blend looks very good!  :)

When I find time I might try a “00” flour in combination with the Ultragrain flour and maybe use the Ischia starter.  I would like to make a healthier pizza to taste.

Keep us updated on your progress.  I also have the Ultragrain white whole wheat flour.

Norma
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Offline Prefessa

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Re: Working with whole grains (including the Ultragrain flour)
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2012, 10:53:49 AM »
Guys: I made legendary Pizza Dough this weekend with 100% Whole Wheat Flour(KA Organic) with NO White Flour whatsoever and it was Yummy, tossed and stretched like a dream. The Key is using a Whole Meal Soaker! Which is essentially a mixture of your whole grain flour and water that you let sit for 12 hrs.

All of the bran and germ that make whole meal flour healthy will rip your gluten to shreds. So you need to fully hydrate everything before kneading! Essentially you do an autolyze at 80-90% Hydration, nothing but flour and water and let it go 12 hrs! After that you add your other ingredients, yeast, salt, oil, malt syrup and the last 10% of your flour. Then you do a cool rise overnight and the dough is wonderful! The final dough was at 72.6% Hydration....whole meal flour soaks up water like a sponge!!!

Offline norma427

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Re: Working with whole grains (including the Ultragrain flour)
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2012, 11:52:44 AM »
Guys: I made legendary Pizza Dough this weekend with 100% Whole Wheat Flour(KA Organic) with NO White Flour whatsoever and it was Yummy, tossed and stretched like a dream. The Key is using a Whole Meal Soaker! Which is essentially a mixture of your whole grain flour and water that you let sit for 12 hrs.

All of the bran and germ that make whole meal flour healthy will rip your gluten to shreds. So you need to fully hydrate everything before kneading! Essentially you do an autolyze at 80-90% Hydration, nothing but flour and water and let it go 12 hrs! After that you add your other ingredients, yeast, salt, oil, malt syrup and the last 10% of your flour. Then you do a cool rise overnight and the dough is wonderful! The final dough was at 72.6% Hydration....whole meal flour soaks up water like a sponge!!!


Prefessa,

Great to hear you made a legendary Pizza Dough this weekend using 100% Whole Wheat flour with no white flour.  ;D  Jimmyg (Jim) and I have been working on an epoxy dough with a preferment and a soaker at  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,19129.0.html  We aren’t using all whole wheat flour though.  I know I have tried some experiments with Ulragrain flour and know how that flour soaks up water. 
 
Thanks so much for posting your method and formulation to try with whole wheat flour.  :) I can imagine other members will be interested.

Norma
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