Author Topic: Using beer in your pizza dough  (Read 118570 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #350 on: January 06, 2013, 10:26:58 PM »
Hi Dan,

The very first beer that I tried was Red Hook ESB. It works Fantastic and for a great price per bottle. In fact, the original recipe that I got from a Pizzeria friend that owns 6 Pizzerias in WA state, uses Red Hook ESB only. It is great beer that produces great results. Glad to hear you tried it.

TomN


Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #351 on: January 07, 2013, 02:48:45 AM »
Blue Moon Vintage Blonde Ale Reserve Collection 2012 - RESULTS

I was very impressed with the results of my dough made with Blue Moon Vintage Blonde Ale Reserve Collection 2012. So much, that i plan to buy a few more bottles and hide them away for another time.
(Provided I can still find it)

The cold rise came out really nice and the texture of the dough was very impressive. It was easy to press out and work with.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2013, 02:55:05 AM by TomN »

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #352 on: January 07, 2013, 02:52:29 AM »
I used all the dough for three 14" pizzas. The first request was a mushroom pizza. Again, this beer produced great results.

Final thought: There was not much foam in this beer, but it did have bubbles. Perhaps because of the Chardonnay Juice that it was brewed with??

(Amazing how much mushrooms shrink when baked)

GO SEAHAWKS!!!
« Last Edit: January 07, 2013, 02:56:25 AM by TomN »

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #353 on: January 15, 2013, 11:41:44 PM »
Pliney the Elder has left the building...

I had made some great pizza with this beer, sorry to see it leave my state of WA. I sure enjoyed making pizza dough with it while it lasted.

BREAKING NEWS -- Monday, December 31, 2012

Im sorry to be the bearer of sad news but the attached letter is to inform our customers that Russian River Brewing Co. has made the decision to withdraw from the Washington market. Please let our customers know that we and Russian River very much appreciate their support of the brand over the years but the necessity is outside of our control. Please also know that we very much appreciate the hard work many of our staff at Click have put in, particularly in light of the often challenging aspects of managing this sought after brand in your territory. What we have in inventory (Damnation bottles) is the last of what we will have available.

Its a sad day to lose such a great brand and to no longer do business with our friends Vinnie and Natalie but were parting on good terms and I suspect that if and/or when theyre able to come back into Washington, that wed be their first distributor choice.

Thanks

Rick Steckler
President & COO
Click Wholesale Distributing, Inc.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2013, 11:44:07 PM by TomN »

Offline Don K

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1281
  • Age: 49
  • Location: Ohio
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #354 on: January 15, 2013, 11:53:12 PM »
That's a bummer Tom. Years ago Pliney was IT, but at least now there are lots of other really good IPA's out there.
The member formerly known as Colonel_Klink

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #355 on: January 16, 2013, 01:05:43 AM »
Thanks Colonel_Klink (Don),

I know there is a whole world of beer out there, including many IPA's. I just liked what Pliny the Elder did for my pizza dough. However, half the fun is trying new beers and seeing how they work in the dough making process.

Thanks again.

TomN
PS
I have been under the weather with all this Flu going around, so I have taken a short leave from dough making. I will back at it again soon.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2013, 01:08:14 AM by TomN »

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 12474
  • Location: Durham,NC
  • Easy peazzy
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #356 on: January 16, 2013, 11:19:52 AM »
Get well soon TomN.... :)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #357 on: January 16, 2013, 02:30:38 PM »
Thanks Bob!!!

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #358 on: January 17, 2013, 11:35:32 PM »
Digital Scale

Picked up a Digital Scale at Costco today for only $15.99 before tax. Also, picked up a few special hard to find beers to make dough with. I plan to make some dough with measurements this weekend.

Question:

This scale can measure in pounds, ounces, kilograms, grams. I have only measured in dry cups and liquid ounces. What is the "NORM" for measurements in bakers scale, etc... when it comes to pizza making in the pizza community???


Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #359 on: January 17, 2013, 11:38:40 PM »
Total Wine & More - has a great beer selection
« Last Edit: January 18, 2013, 12:10:14 AM by TomN »

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #360 on: January 18, 2013, 12:07:56 AM »
99 Bottles - My other beer store

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #361 on: January 18, 2013, 12:15:54 AM »
My current Recipe measurements:

(Mix in a bowl)
4 cups Pendleton Power Flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 Tablespoon of Extra Virgin Olive oil (or a quick pour)

(Mix in a glass)
1 & 1/2 teaspoon Quick Rise Yeast
1/2 teaspoon of sugar
5 ounces warm water

(in a separate glass)
9 ounces of beer (beer of your choice, but do not use Stout Beers) (in My opinion)

Mix all ingredients and knead for 10 mins. I usually add the yeast mixture first and mix it in then the beer.  (add more beer if your dough is too dry during the kneading process)
Coat the finished dough ball with Extra virgin olive oil and place in zip lock freezer bag. (One Gallon Size bag) You can make 3 smaller dough balls and bag them,  but I usually do not have the fridge space to do this.
Place the plastic zip lock freezer bag in the Fridge for 24 hours.
Recipe makes enough for three 14" pizzas (Obviously, divide the large dough ball into three smaller dough balls after it rises for 24 hours )

Let the cold dough warm up a little bit. However, cooler dough makes the press out easier.  Then, I press the dough out by hand and cook them on a 14" pizza screen at 425 degrees for 15 minutes
(oven is a standard home oven with a heating element and be sure to preheat your oven)


I use Pendleton Power flour and recently I have been using a dough hook on my Kitchen Aid mixer. I still knead the dough into a ball and then transfer it to the mixer. As you make dough, you get to know the process better and better. You will be able to tell in the kneading process if you should have more or less hydration percentage (beer or water). If too sticky, add a little more flour. if too dry add a little more beer. It can change depending on the area of the country you live in, Sea Level, etc... Try to get good on your measurements but Don't get so upset about it as you learn the process. Remember, this is for home and you do not have a line of customers waiting either. Again, as you make dough more often, you get used to what needs to be done. Most of all and most importantly, HAVE FUN DOING IT.

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23216
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #362 on: January 18, 2013, 09:09:21 AM »
This scale can measure in pounds, ounces, kilograms, grams. I have only measured in dry cups and liquid ounces. What is the "NORM" for measurements in bakers scale, etc... when it comes to pizza making in the pizza community???

Tom,

Unless you are making a lot of dough, I think you can go with either ounces or grams for weights. In my work, especailly when I am seeking greater accuracy in my calculations, I prefer to work with grams, which I can convert to ounces if necessary using my calculator.

Peter

Offline B.F.SkinnersRevenge

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 5
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #363 on: January 18, 2013, 11:44:55 PM »
Just discovered Total Wine when me and a buddy made a road trip to pick up Westvleteren 12 (on 12/12/12). Just an awesome selection of beers. We got our Westy and then just stared at beer for a good 2 hours.

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #364 on: January 18, 2013, 11:58:26 PM »
It is amazing how many Isles of beer and wine are in that place. However, do not underestimate the smaller beer store either. Sometimes the small store can get a reserve/ limited / special release / or seasonal beer as well and have less people searching it out before you do. (Just a thought)

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #365 on: January 19, 2013, 10:40:36 PM »
Stone Enjoy By 02.15.13 IPA  - Stone Brewing Company

Picked up this beer the other day at my beer store - "99 Bottles". This beer was just released on the market and had a purchase limit of two bottles per person. Of course, I only needed one bottle for dough making. This IPA is 9.4 percent alcohol which will cook out but will flavor the dough in a nice way. The IPA was lighter in color but has a distinct taste all it's own. Perfect for dough making. However, it is a limited release.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2013, 10:53:47 PM by TomN »

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #366 on: January 19, 2013, 10:41:17 PM »
The dough making turned out very well.


Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #367 on: January 19, 2013, 10:44:04 PM »
Normally, I bag the entire dough ball into one gallon sized freezer bag (after lightly coating with Olive Oil) for the 24 hour cold rise. However, I had extra room in my fridge, so I divided the large ball into three 12 oz dough balls.

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #368 on: January 19, 2013, 10:48:10 PM »
Beer weighs the same 9 0z in weight as i does measured by 9 fluid 0z in the measuring cup. Not sure if it weighs different by types of beer??

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #369 on: January 22, 2013, 01:43:53 AM »
The next time I make dough, I am going to make sure there is room again in one of my two refrigerators. Although it takes extra freezer bags, it was so convenient to press out the individual dough ball without going through the cutting process. i think it even made the press out better too. With the scale, i can evenly weigh out three 12 oz dough balls before the cold rise, as i did on this recent dough making process. I have tired to make this tread for the person that is cooking at home with minimal equipment. However, the scale and my Kitchen Aid has made dough making so much easier. The dough balls were given a 48 hour cold rise and the dough turned out fantastic. Also, the IPA beer gave the dough a wonderful smell and flavor.

I made three dough balls but only used two tonight.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2013, 01:53:48 AM by TomN »

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #370 on: January 22, 2013, 01:48:31 AM »
Again, i was very happy with this batch of dough, the beer that i used (Stone Enjoy By 02.15.13 IPA ), and the extra help from the scale and the Kitchen Aid.

TomN
PS
A cup of Pendleton Power Flour weighed out at 56 grams and i used four cups.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2013, 01:50:04 AM by TomN »

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23216
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #371 on: January 22, 2013, 10:12:50 AM »
A cup of Pendleton Power Flour weighed out at 56 grams and i used four cups.

Tom,

Is there an error with the above weight for a cup of the Pendleton Power flour? 56 grams is a bit less than 2 ounces.

Peter

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #372 on: January 22, 2013, 12:30:29 PM »
Peter,

I posted this from memory, so I will weigh out some flour tonight and recheck my findings. I thought it was 56 grams per cup of flour, but let me check again. Thanks.

TomN

Offline TomN

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1676
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #373 on: January 23, 2013, 12:52:59 AM »
Hi Peter,

I use Pendleton POWER Flour. I leveled out one cup of flour that weighed in at 6.0 oz / 168 grams / .168 KG.   (My scale has "ZERO" and "TARE" Functions so this is just the flour.) I use four cups of flour in my recipe.

Sorry for the previous figures :(

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23216
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #374 on: January 23, 2013, 07:26:04 AM »
I use Pendleton POWER Flour. I leveled out one cup of flour that weighed in at 6.0 oz / 168 grams / .168 KG.   (My scale has "ZERO" and "TARE" Functions so this is just the flour.) I use four cups of flour in my recipe.

Tom,

No need to apologize.

A 6-ounce cup is a "heavy" cup. Can you tell me how you measure out the flour, that is, how the flour gets from its storage container (flour bag or a storage unit) into your measuring cup? For me to get six ounces of flour (by weight) into a cup, I would have to either scoop the flour out of the container using my measuring cup so that the flour mounds over the measuring cup by a fair amount and then level it, or I would have to gradually add flour to the measuring cup and periodically tamp the cup against a flat surface or hit the sides of the measuring cup with something to cause the flour to settle in the measuring cup. My measuring cup is a metal cup without a lip and intended for use with dry ingredients.

Whatever the answer is, it is good to know the weight of one of your cups of Power flour. That should help members who want to try your beer-based doughs.

Peter


 

pizzapan