Author Topic: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One  (Read 243387 times)

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Offline TipJockey

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #340 on: January 10, 2010, 10:09:55 AM »
Tipjockey, I'd like to ask you a question about dough laminating technique if you don't mind. When you guys laminate your dough is the final pass merely holding the layers together or do you actually drop the thickness factor down to further thin out the dough? Can you provide any insight at all on the lamination process such as number of folds, number of passes, etc. ? Thanks.

 I never worked in dough making (very few members on the service floor did at my department, it was often the job of the dishwasher who clocks in before all but the supervisor) though from what I observed it's far less special than you'd expect.

 The crust ingredients came as a "kit" (like our sauce), just add warm water and it's good for the mixer. Then it goes into a plastic bag and put into the walk-in to rise.

 The dough that's already fermented goes into a dough press machine which varies our thin and pan crusts. I wish I could say really but I can't imagine where lamination fits in the process really, the thin crust skins didn't look as though they had layers when they were cold. To get an idea of what we worked with before it goes in the over, try putting two pennies flat together to get an idea of the ideal depth and imagine a disc that's SLIGHTLY softer than clay for the density.

 A good, cold ,dusted thin crust skin barely feels like dough at all.


Offline ronathon01

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #341 on: January 12, 2010, 03:01:11 PM »
Hello, This is a response to the texture of the thick crust dough that round table makes.
 I am a former Round Table employee. I was employed when Round Table used the brick
ovens to prepare there pizza. I believe that this is the best way to prepare pizza. But when
it come to the thick crust pizza at round table, they not only bake it in a pizza pan with dime
size holes all over the bottom of it but we lined the pizza pan with a thin layer of olive oil. I do
not recall the cooking temp though. Also when rolling out the dough make sure that there is plenty
of flour on it when you roll it out. When the pizza skin is rolled out to size, relax it by pushing the
edges back in and roll it again until it is to the desired size. Always end with relaxing the pizza skin.
That way it does not shrink or turn into a football shape. The color of the crust when it is done
should also be the same color of a used wooden cutting board. The best way I can describe it is
a medium brown. During the baking process always pop the bubbles, it prevents the cheese from
burning and the toppings from sliding to the middle of the pizza. I cannot tell you the actual recipe for
the dough because of copy rights and I really don't know anyways. It came in a premixed bag.
 I hope this helps people in there quest in creating a finer home brewed pizza.

              Good Luck, and Bake on...

                                 Yours Truly, Ronathon

Offline elsegundo

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #342 on: January 12, 2010, 10:10:49 PM »
Here again are the exact ingredients for Round Table Pizza Crust Mix 24.25 lbs (11.00 KG), add water only:
Water to be added is 80-85 degree 11 pounds of it
Enriched bleached wheat flour (bleached wheat flour, malted barley flour, niacin, ferrous sulfate, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid)

salt

partially hydrogenated soybean and cottonseed oil

sugar

nonfat dry milk

yeast                 Mix 6 1/2 minutes on speed #1, put in bags and into the cooler.

Just a reminder.

Offline fazzari

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #343 on: January 14, 2010, 08:55:58 PM »
Well, it's been over 2 years since I first attempted Peter's RT clone..and the last one was so good I thought I'd try it again with my improved lamination process.  I'm making this pizza, knowing I definitely want it laminated and so I'm devising my process to accomodate my rolling pin, and to make it simple.

The recipe is
100% high gluten flour
 48%  hot water
 1.75% salt
 1.50% oil
 1.25% sugar
 1.25% nonfat dry milk
  .40% SAF yeast

Put all dry ingredients in KitchenAid bowl and mix.  Add hot water (I used 115 degree) and oil and mix.  I mixed mine for 5 minutes.  Cover bowl with plastic and place in a barely warm oven for 90 minutes.  After 90 minutes my dough was warm and soft.  I took my dough to my dough board (this was a 30 ounce dough ball, and using my rolling pin I sheeted a piece of dough that was 23 inches by 15 inches the same size as my dough board.  This might have taken 1 minute..it was very easy!!  I then folded this sheet in thirds and then into half making a piece of dough six layers thick.  I then proceeded to sheet this piece of dough into another sheet which was 23 inches by 15 inches.  The secret to accomplishing this is to take your time and let the dough rest when it starts pulling back..just cover it with a cloth and walk away for a couple minutes.  It took me about 10 minutes to roll this sheet, but most of this time is rest time for the dough....the process is actually very easy.

From this sheet I cut out 5 skins with a 7 1/2 inch plate.  I then put these skins in the freezer for 1 hour, and then I stacked them in my refrigerator until I used them.  You can see from one of my photos, that even with a six layer lamination I was able to roll the final skins out to 1/8 inch.  I let the skins refrigerate for 22 hours and then decided to try a couple.  The pizza shown is a 71/4 inch skin which weighs 3.55 ounce.

I am convinced that these types of skins get the best texture by baking them right on the hearth, in my case I have unglazed quarry tiles.  It only makes sense because the faster you get heat to the bottom of the skin, the better oven spring you will get and also the crispier pizza you will get.  You can see just how gorgeous the bottom of the skin turned out.

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #344 on: April 24, 2010, 07:44:05 PM »
The sauce I used was again a modification of the one you have previously posted:
28 oz. canned tomato puree (Escalon 6-in-1 preferred)
3 oz tomato paste
1 Tbsp. fresh basil
2 tsp. sugar
1 tsp. Oregano
1 tsp. fennel seed
1 tsp. chili powder
1 tsp. powdered garlic
tsp. black pepper
tsp. cayenne pepper
tsp. onion powder
tsp. fine salt (used salt substitute, KCl)
Add water to desired consistency (usually about 6 oz.). 

I spread the sauce as far to the edge as possible to mimic the RT pizzas I've had.  I then added the cheese, an 80-10-10 mixture of shredded Mozzarella (Cosco), cheddar (Cosco), and provolone (some brand I picked up at Whole Foods). 


ME, is this still the recipe you're using for the RT sauce clone? Also are you still using 80-10-10 on the cheese?

My sheeter will be here in about a week and I am preparing my first plan of attack on this style. Interestingly, there are no pizza places within 200 miles where I live that make a laminated crust pizza.

I smell a potential business in the making...

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #345 on: April 24, 2010, 09:58:32 PM »
Dan:

Yes, these are the sauce and cheese I am still using.  I don't think the sauce is really that close to the real thing.  I think Round Table actually uses a Hunt's product (sauce or paste) with a spice blend that I have been trying to duplicate.  The cheese is spot on, though.

-ME
Let them eat pizza.

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #346 on: April 24, 2010, 10:21:46 PM »
I recall Lydia making the same comment to me in pm regarding the sauce being a hunts product. Whatever it is I definitely think it's a paste or processed tomato puree and not anything fresh or bright as 6 in 1s. With no RT around me for miles this is going to be difficult to nail down, however your list is a great start.

I recently began doing a lot of chinese cooking and there was a big culinary lesson I learned - A lot of individual components of a dish rarely taste good by themselves. I recall getting some sauce on the side of a local pizza joint that I absolutely loved. The pizza was a laminated crust with an unbelievable fermented beer flavor profile. The sauce alone tasted horrible. Almost like it had cheap wine or bitter cheap beer in it. Mix it with some yeasty laminated crust, some greasy cheese and oohh man it was heaven. Back to RT sauce, I have tasted it cold before and wasn't impressed, but it's this "not impressed" profile one needs to shoot for when trying to make the sauce. You won't really KNOW how it tastes until you make the pie and you see how it complements the other items in the dish. I guesss what I am saying is I never used to view cooking like this. I always tried to make each individual component taste good in their own right. But this Chinese cooking thing has really taught me the best dishes have ingredients that play off one another. Sweet and sour, spicy and sweet, salty and sweet. this even applied to textures, cruchy and soft, chewy and crisp, etc.

Offline Lydia

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #347 on: May 03, 2010, 09:31:03 PM »
Hey Dan

I found my last RT sauce clone but, since it was on my zip drive I don't have my hand written notes that go with it. But I do remember I was pretty excited about this one. And unfortunately it didn't have the quantity or the type of tomato product. I was mixing the spices prior to adding them to the sauce.

1-tsp Mexican oregano
1-tsp cayenne
1-tsp ground coriander
1-tsp ground fennel seeds
1-tsp garlic powder
1-tsp onion powder
1-tsp ancho chili powder
1/2-tsp California or new Mexico chili powder
1/2-tsp ground cumin
1/2-tsp black pepper
1/2-tsp white pepper

I remember I added a bit of ginger but I don't remember if I thought it was right. I remember the coriander enhanced all the other spices and was the citrus-piney aroma that I was having trouble identifying.

If I can I will try to give this another go. I've got a good feeling.

The current RT sauce is made withHeinz tomato paste.


Lydia
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #348 on: May 04, 2010, 11:19:25 AM »
Thanks Lydia!

That sauce from ME was delicious! I used 1 - 28oz can of sauce and one small can of tomato paste and it tasted very "bright". I have been tasting it over a few days now to see if oxidation mellows out the tomato a bit, but it hasn't. Do you know if they use paste exclusively and dilute it in water? I think it's the sauce version that is giving it this bright taste.

How about cheese? Do you know who they are using for their cheese supply? I looked online for cheese retailers that were around since the 50's and are currently using non-rennet enzyme. Tillamook looks like a good suspect. They've been around for a while. I don't see that they make provolone, but perhaps for the commerical folks it's different? I also haven't played much with this cheese to evaluate the stretch, etc. but from what I recall there is a lot of oil-off from the cheese on RT pizza. I was also thinking that the cheese supplier is most likely on the west coast, only because back in the 50's and 60's it was a lot more difficult to get fresh goods across the country. Do you think this is the case?

Offline Lydia

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #349 on: May 04, 2010, 12:39:09 PM »
Dan

Tillamook doesn't make mozz. I've use the Monterey jack on my homemade RT but I vaguely remember that it doesn't quite melt to the right consistency. I think it melted too liquidy. But the mild or medium cheddar should be fine. But sometimes when you mix brands they don't melt well and can become gritty or streaked and gloppy. Golden California brand was the last know cheese supplier. The cheddar is aged, the provelone is smoked (but I don't taste it much) and the mozz is whole milk. The Private label cheese "First Street" from Smart & Final and Cash & Carry IS the Golden California brand. Golden California Brand is a dairy co-op and spans most of central California and is distributed mostly under private labels as well as "golden California" brand that has a picture of the golden gate across it's label. I believe the store brand, Joseph farms from Save Mart is another one. I don't know what to recommend in Montana. California's cheese distribution has grown alot. Look for the Gold California cheese seal and try those. Otherwise Precious whole milk mozz. is close. Kraft polly-o was ok. I can't find the right provelone, all the ones I'm finding are too strong and overpower everything, even if i just sprinkle some on. So I've had to switch to using 50/50 mozz and Monterey jack and occasionally sprinkle the cheddar on top (this is how it used to be done. the cheddar wasn't always mixed in.) I don't focus much on what the rennet is, RT didn't always use veg rennet. I'm more concerned with flavor and texture.

Something to keep in mind about the cheese is that in your home oven you want the cheese to just get completely melted and not much futher than that. With the brands I've been using 550 has been ideal with 500F working out alright. anything below that the cheese is a oily gloppy mess and nasty to boot. The RT in Kauai sp?? still uses the deck ovens and they say their crusts are superior to the mainland, they're more moist and tender and still have the right amount of crisp. They even still play white Snake on the juke.

Oscar Meyer pepperoni is the closest consummer brand I have found to RT pepperoni but Kraft has reformulated everything, and I mean everthing, so I don't know if this is still true.

The tomato flavor shouldn't be bright but not tinny either. food service paste or concentrated crushed is what you really need. At RT very little water is added to the paste. Additional water is added after storing in the refrigerator. how much water you'll need is going to be dependent on the brand you use. But it should still be heavy and paste like. It should still cling to a spoon without dropping and not spread evenly. When they spread the sauce on it has "bald spots" or areas that are very thin...Hunt's grocery brand of tomato paste has been improved, so I'm wanting to give it another chance. I used it my recipe for taco sauce and surprised me with decent flavor but alittle bit tinny.
Lydia
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.


Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #350 on: May 04, 2010, 06:36:54 PM »
Wow Lydia. :o Thanks for the wealth of information! Finding the right products in Montana is an issue.

Cheese: By looking for companies that were doing business in the 50's and are currently using the non-rennet enzyme I was hoping to narrow down the actual  company that makes cheese for RT. Reason I mentioned Tillamook is I saw they do make a mozzarella and several cheddars. http://www.tillamookcheese.com/OurProducts/Cheese/Mozzarella.aspx for instance. They also have a very long history in California. I think I recall what you said about it being too "liquidy" when melted. Like it had no stretch to it at all. I haven't tried this brand of cheese in a long time so my memory is fuzzy. So "Golden California" is THE brand they use in the restaurants?

Sauce: I was pleasantly surprised by the Hunt's paste. Not as tinny as I remember it back in the 90's. Next I will try strictly paste with some water added. I think the perk came from the sauce version.

I am still waiting on my bakers dry milk so I can try some experiments with lard vs. crisco. I think I have the actual fermentations down from my previous pilot experiment in which one bubbled up nice and the other has RT blisters on the bottom. These were both done on a pizza screen, but I will switch to the pizza stone to mimick a real deck. I also have a die cutter coming so I can die cut my sheets true to the style.

Offline Lydia

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #351 on: May 04, 2010, 10:39:08 PM »
OMG! How did I miss Tillamook mozz? I love their cheese, but in my opinion it is a higher quality eating cheese (vs melting cheese) although Tillamook makes a good mac n cheese though, I think it's because recipes use a starch like flour and is meant to be more fluid.

California Golden "was" the brand the cheese, I don't know when or for how long and I don't know if it still is. I know that grande was suppose to be "bubblegum cheese", but I didn't have that experience. So maybe what I was getting, was just too aged.

May I suggest hydrogenated, deodorized lard and not some expensive refrigerated stuff. A least not for this application. I really don't know if it will be a factor here since RT uses pretty warm water, but watch for containers that show signs of being stored at too high a temp. eg. oily packaging. If the lard/shortening melts even slightly before using it will affect the dough. You can't just fix it by firming it up in the fridge, once it's been melted, the properties change. If only the top layer is affected it can be scrapped off, but that not a guarantee. Also my experience when replacing crisco with lard is that I have to reduce amounts by 2 T per cup. Sorry that it's not more precise. I have found some food service shortening with similar ingredients to original Crisco. The last one I tried had way too much air whipped into it so it was really fluffy and too soft. I have a couple more to try before I move on to lard. the new formula crisco has a lower melting point and I think the flavor is funky.

Wish I had a sheeter so I could experiment with you.  :'( I'm just jealous. i vaguely recall reading someing about the tiny surfaace blisters being caused by a combination of surface friction (eg kneading or sheeting) and blocking steam but we may have covered that already. I know I have it in some current notes. I still can't belive how long we've been at this :o

Lydia
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #352 on: May 05, 2010, 01:30:02 AM »
I still can't belive how long we've been at this :o


That's why I'm down $850 and using commercial utensils now. I figure since I haven't hit it right yet, I need to step it up a notch to play with the big boys. Before I had moved there was no incentive, you just went down the street and bought a pizza. Out here the best I can get down the street is papa murphys.  :(

I have a lot more incentive now to make this actually happen!

Move to a desert island, does wonders for your cooking ability.  :-D
« Last Edit: May 05, 2010, 01:31:59 AM by DNA Dan »

Offline Lydia

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #353 on: May 05, 2010, 07:19:46 PM »
Anyone remember the old cartoon camalot characters painted on the walls inside the RT's.

Here is a link to some coloring pages. http://www.round-table.com/childcolor.htm

Quote
Guinevere, or Gwen, as her friends call her, is the lovely princess and heir to the throne of Round Table and its delicious pizza. The noble and fearless Knight, whose identity is unknown, is defender of the castle and all of the citizens of Round Table. Merlin is the friendly magician who uses magic to create the best tasting pizzas and toppings for Round Table. Montague is the only known pizza-loving dragon on the planet. He uses his fire-breathing power to help Merlin cook the pizzas. This silly dragon is known for getting himself into trouble. He's always trying to get his claws on a slice of Round Table Pizza. The Castle is home for all of the characters of Round Table. The Castle is a place where everyone rejoices and celebrates life!


Maybe we're using the wrong tools... where's Merlin and Montague!?! :-D
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #354 on: May 06, 2010, 11:25:37 AM »
On the RT homepage the FAQ has a description of how they adopted the whole King Arthur theme:

"What is the meaning of the "shields" in the Round Table Pizza logo?
Round Table Pizza was founded by Bill Larson in 1959. The first restaurant was located in Menlo Park, California. Mr. Larson wanted to have a fun, casual pizza restaurant for his friends and family to enjoy. Because he was focusing on his own family and friends, he insisted that the pizza had to be the best. He was the person who started the policy that every Round Table pizza's ingredients would be fresh and plentiful, and that we would roll our dough fresh every day, in every restaurant. And after 40 years in business, we still do. As far as the shields go, the original concept of "Round Table" was to signify a gathering place - it had nothing to do with King Arthur or the Knights of the Round Table. One day, in about 1961, a friend of Mr. Larsons was eating pizza in the restaurant and started drawing the characters from King Arthur's court, all eating pizza. Mr. Larson was so excited he adopted the King Arthur Theme and started making the restaurants look like English castles.The shields were added to the logo (the name) about 1970. There are actually three shields and believe it or not, they symbolize the letters "F", "U", "N", spelling FUN! Most people don't see that when they look at the shields, but that's the true story!"

I don't recall many commercials that played on that theme, then again it's probably before my time. I remember most of the commercials in the 80's which had the funny looking guys like the following:



I love it. I guess people who eat RT are either fat or dorky. LOL. They certainly had some great marketing.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2010, 11:27:14 AM by DNA Dan »

Offline Lydia

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #355 on: May 06, 2010, 01:41:44 PM »
I made up this sauce last night with the Hunts tomato paste. First I mix the spice mix then. Then I added 1/2 Tablespoon to 6 oz Hunt's tomato paste, but I can't remember if I added another 1/2T after tasting it. So the ratio is 1/2-1T seasoning mix to 6 oz paste combined with 2-4 T water.

Quote
1-tsp Mexican oregano
1-tsp cayenne
1-tsp ground coriander
1-tsp ground fennel seeds
1-tsp garlic powder changed to granulated
1-tsp onion powder
1-tsp ancho chili powder
1/2-tsp California or new Mexico chili powder
1/2-tsp ground cumin
1/2-tsp black pepper McCormick table grind (course ground) Malabar black pepper
1/2-tsp white pepper

Notes: I omitted the onion powder, I'm not sure it's in the RT sauce and in addition it's not on the last known ingredient label. The aroma is nearly dead on. Garlic and Cayenne definitely need to be reduced, and Fennel might need to be reduced. Sauce is benefited by a couple hours rest before using to let flavors meld. BTW I was getting some sweet flavor in this sauce, I don't know if it was the paste or maybe the coriander, but I wanted to mention that the sweetness is "right" for the RT sauce.

RT sauce is 11 herbs and spices. I bolded the ones I don't intend to remove so I have 3 slots to play with yet.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #356 on: May 06, 2010, 09:50:24 PM »
I made up this sauce last night with the Hunts tomato paste. First I mix the spice mix then. Then I added 1/2 Tablespoon to 6 oz Hunt's tomato paste, but I can't remember if I added another 1/2T after tasting it. So the ratio is 1/2-1T seasoning mix to 6 oz paste combined with 2-4 T water.

Notes: I omitted the onion powder, I'm not sure it's in the RT sauce and in addition it's not on the last known ingredient label. The aroma is nearly dead on. Garlic and Cayenne definitely need to be reduced, and Fennel might need to be reduced. Sauce is benefited by a couple hours rest before using to let flavors meld. BTW I was getting some sweet flavor in this sauce, I don't know if it was the paste or maybe the coriander, but I wanted to mention that the sweetness is "right" for the RT sauce.

RT sauce is 11 herbs and spices. I bolded the ones I don't intend to remove so I have 3 slots to play with yet.

How do you know it's 11 herbs and spices? I thought that was KFC :-D


I made this up tonight for tomorrow's pizza. The cumin seems very overpowering, but then again I need the whole pie done to evaluate it effectively. What about salt? I don't see any listed. Also, at a pizza place I used to work the sauce's secret ingredient was homegrown tarragon. I think it adds more body to the sauce. I'm impressed with what you have so far.

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #357 on: May 06, 2010, 10:23:00 PM »
Here's a story I found on Golden Cheese. Bummer. Sounds like a lot of people lost their livelihood.

http://www.pe.com/business/local/stories/PE_Biz_D_cheese19.6ec7e6.html

They mention being owned by Dairy Farmers of America (DFA) and I also came across this page:

http://www.agridigest.com/dairyschreiber.html

Which does not mention Golden Cheese directly, but does mention Corona, CA as the plant they are moving operations to another location. The timeline also seems to fit. That new location is mentioned as Schreiber Foods, Inc. I searched for this company and they have a website here: http://www.schreiberfoods.com/schreiberweb/

They list two retail brands that I have never even heard of. Pehaps this is their supplier of cheese now?
« Last Edit: May 06, 2010, 10:47:28 PM by DNA Dan »

Offline Lydia

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #358 on: May 06, 2010, 11:46:37 PM »
Hey there.

Just plug in "11 herbs and spices" with "round table pizza" on google. You get a ton of references that state:
Quote
Our zesty red sauce is made from scratch with eleven herbs and spices


The RT sauce samples are loaded with seasonings, but it's perfect on the pizza. When I was smelling and tasting the RT sauce samples, "cumin" is what I thought was very dominate. So I was increasing the cumin but it just wasn't working. I was stuck on getting that spice right for quite some time. It was literally driving me nuts. A light when on an I stubbornly added the coriander. The aroma and flavor was so perfect that i was doing the happy dance. It blends right in with the cumin and smells like a very "bright cumin". It also gave me the citrus and musty aromas that were throwing me.

You know, I should probably point out that it has to be ground coriander seed and not dried cilantro. I guess some regions refer to the dried cilantro as coriander since it's all the same plant.

You should be picking up on a sweet fennel aroma too. I'm thinking that salt isn't needed but I dont see any harm in add a bit.

I just now ground up some dried tarragon and added it to some of the sauce I had left. I can't confirm or deny the tarragon until I get some RT sauce, since it would be pretty subtle in the background. But I liked what I was tasting, so thats a good sign.

The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Lydia

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #359 on: May 06, 2010, 11:55:57 PM »
OMG! the plant is closing  :o I didn't know that. :(

I'm at a loss about the cheese. I'm already freaked out about finding a substitute cheese when we move to michigan. It looks like Saputo and Land o Lakes are CA cheeses. You might want to give those a try if you find them. Otherwise private label might be the way to go.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.