Author Topic: dough sheeting  (Read 5872 times)

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Offline ctimmer

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dough sheeting
« on: October 05, 2005, 12:48:05 AM »
I am on a low-carb diet which makes it difficult to enjoy my favorite food.  A thin crust seems like a good compromise. Any suggestions to achieve the thinest possible dough?

Thanks in advance,
Curt


Offline chiguy

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Re: dough sheeting
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2005, 02:12:11 AM »
I am on a low-carb diet which makes it difficult to enjoy my favorite food.  A thin crust seems like a good compromise. Any suggestions to achieve the thinest possible dough?

Thanks in advance,
Curt
Hi, I have an idea or two. The first is you may consider incorporating 10-15% Soy Flour into your total flour weight. It is Guten free, so a yeast dough cannot handle any more than that. Soy flour has about 60% less Carbs and is high in Ditery Fiber. It will create a more tender crust so you may try to keep water levels around 50-55%. It will change the taste a bit, but nothing you cant hide with a good sauce and cheese. If you are trying to achieve a thin crust rolling it out to your desired thickness is the best method, that is unless you own a dough press or sheeter. A thought to keep in mind is that going to thin can sometimes make for a soggy crust(carefull with the sauce level.)I hope these ideas may be of help to you.        Chiguy

Offline lilbuddypizza

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Re: dough sheeting
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2005, 09:19:28 AM »
I don't know your situation, but I would advise against a low-carb diet. They are a sham. Bad for long term, and if you start on carbs again, the weight flies on.

Offline elsegundo

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Re: dough sheeting
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2005, 11:24:30 PM »
Use a dough sheeter. Don't have $2000, then consider this. You may already own a sheeter. If you have a pasta roller you are in luck.  They run about $50 dollars and are intended for pasta. However, if take a stiff dough and run it through the thickest settting and careful dust each time you can get a marvelous thin crust. If you take the sheet and do a business letter fold you will have a fantastic pizza. After running it though a couple of times, hand stretch it to the width you like. Low carb and a thin crust! Wow. Btw reduce the cheese amount. Your crust will be crisper and you will be thinner.  Just my experience. I could be wrong.

Offline zappcatt

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Re: dough sheeting
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2005, 03:58:50 AM »
Does anyone have an outlet for the "extra wide" 12" or so pasta rollers? I have only seen the up to 6" wide.
Thanks

Offline scampi

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Re: dough sheeting
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2005, 11:53:32 AM »
I think the best way of getting dough thin is simply to learn to toss it. Each time you toss it in the air centrifical force causes the weight of the outiside to pull and the inside gets thinner and thinner. Once it's very thin(almost transparent) cook it and don't eat the outside. I'm sure there are tons of things on the internet showing you how to toss it but what I do is just start with the ball and push with the heals of my hands in the middle til it gets about 8 inches around, Then I make 2 fists and put them in the middle of the dough and spin it up i the air. In about 6 or 7 spins it starts to really stretch out. If it rips, join the club...everyone rips a few in the beginning.

Offline elsegundo

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Re: dough sheeting
« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2005, 12:27:16 PM »
Concerning zappcatts question, I have hunted in vain, so far, to find a wide pasta roller.  You can get larger if you want to pay anywhere from $500-1500. An alternative, which I haven't tried, was suggested by the previous manger of the Bakersfield Shakey's. Grease a cookie sheet and use a rolling pin. I assume she meant the type of cookie sheet that has an edge. Might work. For me I use the six inch pasta roller and stretch the dough by hand out to about 9 inches.

If you find a wider pasta roller for say $200, let use all know.
BTW, that 6 inches might really be 5 1/2 depending on brand.

Offline ctimmer

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Re: dough sheeting
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2005, 02:01:05 AM »
Here's what I've done so far.

I got a pasta roller for my KitchenAid mixer, so I decided to start with the "Pizza Inn" recipe. The first attempt produced a dough that was just too dry. If I hadn't had the pasta roller I would have just thrown this batch away. After putting the dough through the roller enough times I was able to put together a reasonable pizza.

For the second effort I decided to increase the water (1 cup instead of 3/4 cup) and this made a real difference. The dough passed through the roller with very little effort. The batch produced 3 15" pizza's with a little left over. I'm sure it could have been rolled even thinner.

To get a 15" wide sheet from a 5" roller I just laid 3 sheets side by side with a narrow overlap and used a rolling pin to patch them together.

A side note:
I worked for Pizza Inn back in the late sixties (no, I don't remember any of the recipes). The dough was fairly dry after mixing but was always moist and pliable the next morning. I ate a pizza every day and never got tired of it!

Curt
« Last Edit: October 17, 2005, 11:18:40 AM by ctimmer »

Offline Steve

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Re: dough sheeting
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2005, 09:28:22 AM »
Your pictures show which crust? The one with 1 cup of water or 2/3 cup? BTW, nice pictures!
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Offline ctimmer

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Re: dough sheeting
« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2005, 11:18:03 AM »
The pictures were of my 2nd effort using 1 cup of water. The pizza was good but I was concentrating on my dough techniques.

Next week - perfecting a sauce recipe.

Curt


Offline elsegundo

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Re: dough sheeting
« Reply #10 on: October 17, 2005, 02:10:36 PM »
ctimmer:

I agree with you. I think the Pizza Inn recipe needs a little more water especially if you are using a sheeter, which requires a couple of dusting of additional flour and thus reducing the water percentage.
In fact, you are using my exact recipe at this point.
I have used both the Kitchenaid and the manual. Both work. I like the manual a little better because it has a wider setting.
Good luck

Offline Perk

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Re: dough sheeting
« Reply #11 on: February 02, 2006, 08:05:11 AM »
Thanks for the tips I want to make a cracker crust,
So I may have to get a pasta roller for my kitchen aid.
And I like your trick on making 3 sheets then rolling them together.
Also when I try the cracker crust I will go up to 1 cup.

-Dave
Jacksonville Fl.