Author Topic: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage  (Read 59731 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Everlast

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 181
  • Location: Santa Barbara, CA
Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #120 on: December 07, 2012, 02:45:34 PM »
Thanks for the compliment and thanks for the input too. The dough was nicely extensible but probably could have used more warm up time. I think I'll try a full 4 hours tomorrow for warm up adjusting the time if needed.


Offline Don K

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1281
  • Age: 49
  • Location: Ohio
Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #121 on: December 07, 2012, 03:56:28 PM »
Everlast, those pies look great! At first glace, I thought they were Craig's (that's a complement).
The member formerly known as Colonel_Klink

Offline Everlast

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 181
  • Location: Santa Barbara, CA
Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #122 on: December 07, 2012, 04:19:39 PM »
Colonel_Klink, that is quite a compliment - thank you! I can't wait until my next pizza bake tomorrow. Now that I'm getting better at the dough thanks to Craig, I'm thinking about other things like really unorthodox toppings. One thought I have for tomorrow: brown butter base, ricotta cheese, topped with spinach and fresh sage. But I guess that's a topic for another post.

Offline Serpentelli

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1170
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Wilmington, NC
    • Bat Man vs. The Penguin
Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #123 on: April 14, 2013, 05:13:44 PM »
Craig,

I'm working with a new bag of flour and a higher than usual fermentation temp (68-70F)

The dough is 63 / 3 / 1.5 (camaldoli)

Bulk was 24 and now I'm at 9 hours balled. Are these "ready" IYO?

Thanks,

John K

PS I am freezing these for use at a later date when I'll be cooking about 40-50 pizzas so I can't make all the dough at once.  :)
« Last Edit: April 14, 2013, 06:23:08 PM by Pete-zza »
I'm not wearing hockey pads!

Online TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 13235
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #124 on: April 14, 2013, 05:21:37 PM »
From what I see, I'd say not quite. How big were the dough balls (g). Can you post a side shot too - and maybe another bottom shot.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Serpentelli

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1170
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Wilmington, NC
    • Bat Man vs. The Penguin
Re: Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #125 on: April 14, 2013, 05:27:51 PM »
From what I see, I'd say not quite. How big were the dough balls (g). Can you post a side shot too - and maybe another bottom shot.

275-290 g each

The "stacks" of containers are starting to "lean" due to gas production/volume expansion within. None have popped open.

Thanks,

John K
I'm not wearing hockey pads!

Online TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 13235
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #126 on: April 14, 2013, 05:35:30 PM »
I let mine ferment more than that. for a 275g ball, I'd say my whole ball is at least as high as the highest point in your profile shot above. It's interesting, when mine is about where yours looks, my bubbles are smaller. It's about at that point where they really start getting bigger. When mine are ready, the bubbles are about the size and shape as you see in the bottom shot, but there are more of them and they go all the way to the edge. Similar to yours, they don't look as big on the profile shot as they do on the bottom.

I'd pop the tops. I usually don't close them all the way. I don't want the pressure build up holding the down down. I don't know if it makes a difference, but it might.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Serpentelli

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1170
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Wilmington, NC
    • Bat Man vs. The Penguin
Re: Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #127 on: April 14, 2013, 05:41:17 PM »
I let mine ferment more than that. for a 275g ball, I'd say my whole ball is at least as high as the highest point in your profile shot above. It's interesting, when mine is about where yours looks, my bubbles are smaller. It's about at that point where they really start getting bigger. When mine are ready, the bubbles are about the size and shape as you see in the bottom shot, but there are more of them and they go all the way to the edge. Similar to yours, they don't look as big on the profile shot as they do on the bottom.

I'd pop the tops. I usually don't close them all the way. I don't want the pressure build up holding the down down. I don't know if it makes a difference, but it might.

Craig,

Concise and invaluable advice, once again. My hope is that by asking the question here as opposed to via PM is that others can learn right along with me!

My bubbles being larger due to the higher temp, you think?

Thank you again!

John K
I'm not wearing hockey pads!

Online TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 13235
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #128 on: April 14, 2013, 05:46:11 PM »
My bubbles being larger due to the higher temp, you think?

That would be my guess. The different culture might also play a role.

CL
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Serpentelli

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1170
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Wilmington, NC
    • Bat Man vs. The Penguin
Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #129 on: April 14, 2013, 10:05:42 PM »
Craig,

Thanks again for your help. After 24 hour bulk and 14 hour ball, and your advice, I deemed them ready or the deep freeze.

I freeze them in their containers and then pop em out the next day.

They go into vacuum seal bags ( 4 per bag separated by parchment paper) until ready for use.

Day of use I pop em back into the containers and thaw.  No additional fermenting. Has worked pretty well in situations where I'm too busy during the week.

Again, many thanks.

John K
I'm not wearing hockey pads!


Online TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 13235
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #130 on: May 04, 2013, 02:51:43 PM »
More on opening and forming the skin:

The dough ball goes into the flour top down. Flip it and take it out of the flour. The top is now up on the work surface. Look at the underside of your hand - your fingers have three segments. With your fingers extended as far out and up as possible - so that your fingers have an upward bend, press your fingers into the dough so that the middle segment of your middle finger is the first contact point. With a tiny bit of rocking motion, roll your hand back towards you just a little pressing the dough slightly towards you. Your fingertips should never touch the dough. Using as light a pressure as possible, start inside of the cornice by about and work from top to bottom as described above protecting and forming the cornice at the top and the bottom. The pressure is not much more than the weight of your hands. Flip the dough and turn 90 degrees as you set it down. What was the left and right sides are now the top and bottom. Repeat the process. You should now have a cornice all the way around. Protect the cornice. Flip the dough again so that the top is back facing up. Use your fingers the same way to spread the dough a little more. It's OK to gently tug on the edges to stretch and round out the skin. If needed, place the skin over your knuckles and turn it 360 degrees pulling slightly apart with your hands as you go around but mostly let gravity work. If you do this, be careful as you can quickly thin out the enter with a supple dough. When you finish be sure you end up with the top of the dough facing up.

Remember that sliding the dough onto the peel and/or stretching the edge on the peel will also increase the diameter, so you don't need to open the skin to the full final diameter. Stretching to the final diameter on the peel has two additional benefits, 1) it does not thin out the center of the dough, and 2) you get to fix the shape so it goes in to the oven round - or oval as needed - the steep launch angle of a short peel into a home oven tends to deliver a round pie onto the stone round. The shallow angle of a long handle launching  pie deep into a WFO will elongate the pie along the axis of the direction the peel is pulled out from under it. In this case, a slightly oval pie with the long axis perpendicular to the handle of the peel will result in a round pie on the floor.
Pizza is not bread.

Online TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 13235
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #131 on: June 03, 2013, 11:10:31 AM »
This is about the most development I want to see after 24 hours - right before balling. Yes, I have ugly fingernails.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 11385
  • Location: Durham,NC
  • Easy peazzy
Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #132 on: June 03, 2013, 04:00:25 PM »
This is about the most development I want to see after 24 hours - right before balling. Yes, I have ugly fingernails.
Ha!  those are "Sportsman" nails.  8)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Online TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 13235
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #133 on: June 03, 2013, 04:21:51 PM »
Ha!  those are "Sportsman" nails.  8)

No - they are worse than that.  :-D
Pizza is not bread.

scott123

  • Guest
Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #134 on: June 03, 2013, 04:38:40 PM »
No - they are worse than that.  :-D

Craig, it's nice to know that you have some flaws  ;D

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 11385
  • Location: Durham,NC
  • Easy peazzy
Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #135 on: June 03, 2013, 04:47:02 PM »
Craig, it's nice to know that you have some flaws  ;D
Aww shucks Scotty....he's human jus like you an me after all!  :)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline DenaliPete

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 282
Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #136 on: June 05, 2013, 09:34:48 AM »
I'm curious Craig, with the beauty you bring out in your neopolitan pies, do you ever put your home oven to work making a NY style or anything?

If so, I'd be curious what your recipe looks like and how your process differs.

Your threads are great to sift through man, you set the bar high.

Online TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 13235
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #137 on: June 06, 2013, 08:36:07 AM »
I'm curious Craig, with the beauty you bring out in your neopolitan pies, do you ever put your home oven to work making a NY style or anything?

If so, I'd be curious what your recipe looks like and how your process differs.

Your threads are great to sift through man, you set the bar high.

Thanks Pete. Every once in a blue moon, i'll make a NYish pie in my home oven. But I really haven't done any work learning how to maximize the set-up I have. I do make DS with some regularity. http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,21992.0.html
Pizza is not bread.

Offline HAMnEGGr

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 25
  • Location: Wisconsin
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #138 on: June 11, 2013, 09:56:36 PM »
TXCraig1 (or anyone else), if I use IDY instead (SAF Yeast) do you recommend bulk fermenting at 65 for 24 and then balling the dough at room temp for another 24 hours?  Or should I bulk ferment in fridge a la NY pizza and then ball it and ferment it for another 24 at room temperature? 

Thanks!
IDY, I know, heresy.  But I just want to get my feet wet and then will move to SD........

Online TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 13235
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #139 on: June 11, 2013, 10:20:39 PM »
TXCraig1 (or anyone else), if I use IDY instead (SAF Yeast) do you recommend bulk fermenting at 65 for 24 and then balling the dough at room temp for another 24 hours?  Or should I bulk ferment in fridge a la NY pizza and then ball it and ferment it for another 24 at room temperature? 

Thanks!
IDY, I know, heresy.  But I just want to get my feet wet and then will move to SD........

Yes, That is what I would recommend. I have no problem with IDY, but I would never recommend using the refrigerator. For a total of 48 hours at 65F, you probably need about 0.03% IDY.
Pizza is not bread.


 

pizzapan