Author Topic: creating a light, airy pizza crust by Tom Lehmann  (Read 2332 times)

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Online norma427

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creating a light, airy pizza crust by Tom Lehmann
« on: September 30, 2012, 10:43:43 AM »
I was reading an August issue of PMQ Magazine last evening that I must have forgotten to read.  The one article was from Tom Lehamm on creating a light, airy pizza crust.  http://www.pmqmag-digital.com/pmqmag/201208#pg16

I find it interesting what he has to say in this article about achieving a light airy pizza crust.  He only recommended increasing the hydration up to 60%, which is low in many members opinions.

Norma
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scott123

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Re: creating a light, airy pizza crust by Tom Lehmann
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2012, 11:19:08 AM »
Yes, Norma, even for a lower protein flour, 60% is kind of low.

Not to mention that the most important factor in creating a light, airy pizza- heat, isn't mentioned at all in the article.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: creating a light, airy pizza crust by Tom Lehmann
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2012, 11:34:03 AM »
Norma,

I can think of a couple possible explanations for the 60% limitation.

First, as you know, Tom advises mainly professional pizza operators who read the PMQ magazine (and/or the PMQ Think Tank). And, in a professional setting, it is not at all uncommon to see hydration values below 60%. The lower hydration values makes it easier for workers to work with the dough.

Second, if the hydration values get too high, you need the correct amount of oven heat to get the dough to rise in the oven and get good oven spring. As scott123 has noted, Tom doesn't discuss oven temperatures. He also doesn't mention the the style of pizzas he has in mind. For example, many pizza operators who specialize in the NY style pizza use temperatures that can go below 500 degrees, along with fairly long bake times. That is unlikely to be high enough for high hydration doughs.

Peter

Online norma427

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Re: creating a light, airy pizza crust by Tom Lehmann
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2012, 11:48:04 AM »
Peter,

Thanks for your thoughts on the 60% hydration limitation.  I know Tom mostly advises professional pizza operators that read PMQ magazine and PMQTT. 

I can understand if the hydration values get too high, then the correct amount of oven heat to get the dough to rise and get good oven spring would have to be higher.  I also know many pizza operators that specialize in NY style pizzas bake at lower temperatures and for fairly long bake times. 

My hydration right now at 61% isnít too far off of Tomís of 60%, but I do use a higher oven temperature right now.  I am satisfied right now with oven spring, but do always want more.

Norma
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Offline pizzalatino

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Re: creating a light, airy pizza crust by Tom Lehmann
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2012, 09:13:07 PM »
I'm glad I found this topic. I've been trying to find some guidelines around here as far as what temps and hydration levels give you certain results. Or is it just not that cut and dry of an answer. I would love to see like an outline of what is needed to achive ny, thick, airy etc... with those minimum or maximum levels to use. But Norma's answer gives me at least a base to go on. Thanks.