Author Topic: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza  (Read 109443 times)

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Offline junkbot

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #220 on: October 09, 2012, 05:04:38 PM »
Is there any way to make this recipe into a no-knead dough? Kitchen is tiny, and I don't have a stand mixer.


Offline Steven 86

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #221 on: October 14, 2012, 05:17:58 PM »
Recipe works OK, however after weeks of refinement I think I might have just cracked it.

I am using a "pizza maker" pizza oven (which reaches heat of around 570 deg f) so have an unfair advantage.


Nonetheless with the current recipe I have found the pizza to be either to anaemic or too overcooked.

I think increasing the proportion of milk powder (to increase browning) and increase water has made a big difference. I also think using a cast iron pan (i use a skillet) and having a double rising process will make this the best it can be.


Here's my version below. As i said my pizza oven may help but I believe the following amendments should give an improved version in a conventional oven (i'll try this sometime):


For 3 pizzas:


To pan of bread mixer add:

Wet ingredients : add 1 and 1/2 cups of warm water and 2 tbsp olive oil.

Dry ingredients: On top add 4 and 1/8 cups of all purpose flour, 1/2 cup skimmed milk powder (e.g. marvel), 1 tsp salt, 1 tbsp brown sugar, 1 package yeast (7grams).

Allow bread machine to knead for 10 minutes.

When kneaded, coat dough in thin layer of olive oil in a bowl. Cover bowl and allow to rise for half an hour.

Add 1.5 oz olive oil (with optional garlic salt) to 10 inch cast iron skillets.

Roll out around 1/4 inch thick, and put in skillet. Cover skillet (as air tight as possible), with a solid cover.

put in an oven warmed to 95 deg c which has been switched off.

Allow to rise for an hour.

Take out, spray crust with spray release (e.g. fry light). Top with sauce, cheese then toppings, then oregano.

Heat pizza oven to 2, put pizza in and then switch to nearly 3. If using conventional oven put the skillet on a preheated pizza stone on the top rack. Preheat the oven on full whack for a full half an hour before doing so.

Cook for around 7 mins.

Someone please try and let me know what you think!


Thanks


Offline slybarman

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #222 on: November 30, 2012, 10:12:19 AM »
Is the recipe in the OP, the current go-to recipe for Pizza Hut pan pizza at home, or has someone built a better mouse trap over the years in another thread?

My 6 year old son had pan pizza the other day and is now hooked. :)

Offline slybarman

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Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #223 on: January 10, 2013, 06:21:48 PM »
I am going to try this one over the weekend.  A couple questions:
1) is a cast iron skillet appropriate for making pan pizza?
2) am I putting the cold pan and dough into the oven? Does the cold pan heat up quickly enough on its own?

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #224 on: January 10, 2013, 06:28:34 PM »
I am going to try thisnone over the weekend.  A couple questions:
1) is a cast iron skillet appropriate for making pan pizza?
2) am I putting the cold pan and dough into the oven? Does the cold pan heat up quickly enough on its own?
Steven 86 cast iron pan method looks pretty good, no?  1 post above yours...
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline slybarman

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Re: Re: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #225 on: January 10, 2013, 06:37:25 PM »
Steven 86 cast iron pan method looks pretty good, no?  1 post above yours...

LOL. Good thing it didn't have teeth or it would have bit my nose. I am not sure I get the point of putting the skillet on top of a pizza stone. Is it for heat transfer?

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #226 on: January 10, 2013, 06:43:01 PM »
Well, sorta...it transfers the heat more evenly.  ;)
But if one does not have a stone...the cast iron pan's qualities(thick)help even browning/cooking alone by itself.

Also, for the 1.5oz oil coating on bottom of skillet I would not use olive oil...your favorite regular 'ol oil will be fine. Throw some corn, veg, or canola and crisp that baby up.   8)
« Last Edit: January 10, 2013, 06:51:09 PM by Chicago Bob »
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Offline slybarman

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Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #227 on: January 10, 2013, 07:08:21 PM »
Thanks Bob. I must have skipped the entire middle of this thread when I read it. I just saw the pictures of n powerwagonpete's pie in cast iron and it looked very good.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #228 on: January 10, 2013, 07:14:30 PM »
Yep, Pete's got it go'in on.  :chef:
Even the professionals(like..not me!) miss some specs from time to time...it's natural!  8)
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Offline slybarman

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Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #229 on: January 11, 2013, 11:14:53 PM »
I have my first tries in the refrigerator for the cold rise.  The dough looked ok to me. Man that sure seems like a lot of oil in the pan. Fingers crossed.

I was thinking about the powdered milk. Doesnt it just rehydrate and become milk?  What is the benefit of powdered milk over regular milk?


Offline slybarman

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #230 on: January 12, 2013, 02:26:29 PM »
Not a success, but not a total failure either. The taste was decent, but I ended up with way too much dough relative to sauce cheese. the dough way just too thick. I used the recipe in the original post and split it into two 9" pans (lodge logic calls it a 9" pan, but the actual cooking surface is about 7 1/2" diameter). I think I could have done four pies from the recipe. The pan in the picture is 1 3/4" deep.

Because the crust was too thick, it did not really cook enough all the way through. Cutting the thickness in half or so should fix that.

Also, I think the oil could be cut in about half.

I have photos but gave up on trying to upload them to the site. The server was having none of it.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #231 on: January 12, 2013, 03:15:12 PM »
I was thinking about the powdered milk. Doesnt it just rehydrate and become milk?  What is the benefit of powdered milk over regular milk?


Steve,

I am a little bit late on this but pretty much everything you want to know about milk in a dough can be read in this recent PMQ Think Tank post by Tom Lehmann: http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=84770&sid=6533e396c0801023e2f7c7ae9b386694#p84770.

For several years, before Pizza Hut went to frozen dough in the U.S., it used dry milk products in some of its doughs. These days, there aren't many chains or pizza operators who do so. Vito & Nick's, who specialize in the Chicago thin-crust style pizza, use fresh milk, as do some pizza operators who specialize in the Greek-style pizza. Round Table used dry milk in its dough at one point and may still be doing so, and I believe that Donatos went from fresh milk to dry milk.

Peter

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #232 on: January 12, 2013, 03:21:44 PM »
So adding 1% grocery store dry milk will not add any favorable effects on the dough.....hmmm.
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline slybarman

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Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #233 on: January 12, 2013, 03:31:25 PM »
I saw earlier in the thread someone said the whey contributed to browning. Is there a difference in whey between powdered milk and liquid milk?

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #234 on: January 12, 2013, 03:34:15 PM »
Not a success, but not a total failure either. The taste was decent, but I ended up with way too much dough relative to sauce cheese. the dough way just too thick. I used the recipe in the original post and split it into two 9" pans (lodge logic calls it a 9" pan, but the actual cooking surface is about 7 1/2" diameter). I think I could have done four pies from the recipe. The pan in the picture is 1 3/4" deep.

Because the crust was too thick, it did not really cook enough all the way through. Cutting the thickness in half or so should fix that.


Steve,

A lot of members had trouble with the amount of dough called for in the original PH pan dough recipe.  For that reason, I scaled the recipe down to the actual amount of dough that PH was using for its 14" size pizza. You can see the scaled down version at Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909. The thickness factor for that recipe is 0.14291. If you use that thickness factor in the expanded dough calculating tool along with all of the other numbers (baker's percents) in the recipe in Reply 6 referenced above, you should be able to make as many pizzas as you would like and in any desired size.

Peter

Offline slybarman

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Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #235 on: January 12, 2013, 03:56:15 PM »
Cool - thanks peter.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #236 on: January 12, 2013, 04:04:35 PM »
I saw earlier in the thread someone said the whey contributed to browning. Is there a difference in whey between powdered milk and liquid milk?


Steve,

I can't say for sure but I would imagine if that you add back the right amount of water to reconstitute the particular dried form of milk (whole, nonfat, reduced-fat, etc.), the whey content should be the same unless the drying process destroyed part of the whey. If you research the different forms of liquid milk at the NutritionData.Self website at http://nutritiondata.self.com/, you will see that the range of water content for the different forms of milk is about 87-89%.

Peter

Offline slybarman

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #237 on: January 12, 2013, 04:10:23 PM »
Good info Peter.

I used the dough calculator as you suggested. My 9" cast iron pans have a 7 1/2" cooking surface. I am not sure if that means I should use a 7 1/2" pie in the calculator or something smaller as the original recipe called for making a 12" dough for the 14" pan. Of course, I don't know if his 14" pan actually had a 14" cooking surface! Aye caramba.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #238 on: January 12, 2013, 04:38:57 PM »
I used the dough calculator as you suggested. My 9" cast iron pans have a 7 1/2" cooking surface. I am not sure if that means I should use a 7 1/2" pie in the calculator or something smaller as the original recipe called for making a 12" dough for the 14" pan. Of course, I don't know if his 14" pan actually had a 14" cooking surface! Aye caramba.

Steve,

You can see how the thickness factor and pan sizes are used in the expanded dough calculating tool at Reply 140 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,213.msg84184.html#msg84184. Since your dimensions suggest that your cast iron pans have sloping sides, with the major diameter being 9" and the minor diameter being 7 1/2", you might want to use something between those two numbers in the expanded dough calculating tool. Maybe 8" or 8 1/4" will do the trick. You can always tweak the numbers further in the future if you generally like the results you get.

In case you end up liking your next PH pan pizza, you might also want to take a look at a cross between the PH pan pizza and the Godfather's pizza as discussed starting at Reply 15 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12806.msg132091.html#msg132091. Jet_deck (Gene) decided to try the formulation I set forth in Reply 15 but threw me a curveball when he said that he wanted to substitute evaporated milk for the dry milk powder. That led to the changes described in Reply 19 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12806.msg132454.html#msg132454. You can see Gene's results starting at Reply 25 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12806.msg132648.html#msg132648. With a different pan size, some rejiggering of the numbers would be required.

Peter

Offline slybarman

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #239 on: January 12, 2013, 05:03:44 PM »
Good info as always Pete. If I plug in numbers for 2 dough balls at 8" I get

Flour (100%):    247.99 g  |  8.75 oz | 0.55 lbs
Water (55.555%):    137.77 g  |  4.86 oz | 0.3 lbs
ADY (1.18518%):    2.94 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.78 tsp | 0.26 tbsp
Salt (.875%):    2.17 g | 0.08 oz | 0 lbs | 0.39 tsp | 0.13 tbsp
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (4.27199%):    10.59 g | 0.37 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.33 tsp | 0.78 tbsp
Dry Non-Fat Milk (2.35155%):    5.83 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 4.06 tsp | 1.35 tbsp
Total (164.23872%):   407.3 g | 14.37 oz | 0.9 lbs | TF = 0.14291
Single Ball:   203.65 g | 7.18 oz | 0.45 lbs

That is a little more than 1/3 the size of the OP.   ;)


 

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