Author Topic: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza  (Read 121230 times)

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Offline abacaba

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #120 on: October 12, 2008, 05:46:55 PM »
well...I used the bread machine...it didn't really turn out to have the quality of pizza hut pizza  (It was really dry and hard)

but, I think that is due to other reasons.

I used 1/5 cup of oil, an aluminum foil pan (I don't have a deep dish pan), and baked it for 30 mins.

I think those were the reasons for the failure...not the bread machine.

I stopped the kneading at 11:30 mins and the dough turned out fine so probably the bread machine is ok for this dough.


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #121 on: October 12, 2008, 08:05:31 PM »
abacaba,

I'm sure it was the use of the aluminum foil pan that was responsible for the results you achieved. Aluminum, and especially shiny aluminum, will reflect heat rather than absorb it. So, it will be difficult to get good browning and if you try to compensate by using a longer bake time the moisture will be driven out of the dough and the resultant crust will be dry and hard.

Peter

Offline TronCarter

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #122 on: October 14, 2008, 07:29:50 AM »
For a very good Pizza Hut pan style pizza, you should try the recipe shown here:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5656.0.html

It is meant to duplicate a Tommy's Pizza (Pizza L'Oven) sicilian style pizza, which I have never tried, but I think it does come close to a PH pan style.  I agree with Peter that your selection of pan was the problem.  I use a darker pan and a pizza stone and only cook them for 8 minutes (at 550F).  I also include the ingredient amounts for an 8x8 pan towards the end of the thread if you would like to make a small pizza for your first try.

Offline JConk007

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #123 on: January 07, 2009, 08:57:04 PM »
Oops I put my pie in the wrong place never saw this thread sorry for the re post I really liked the flavor very similar to P-Hut pan taste I remember. 
Don't have to buy again unless I am stuck overnight at an airport!  :D
very tight crumb.  I think I had a bit too much dough in the pan I made the  as per recipe Forum  poster Xphmgr and used the percentages and calculator tool to come up with  quantities for 2 - 9" pizzas as
 I took a healthy chunk out of I of them because it rose above the 1 1/2 Pan!
It was a 24 hr refriderator rise followed by 2 hrs room temp.
here they are pre bake.

Peter if you want to remove  my other post from I think thick style? go for it. These are Pizza Hut Pan recipe pizzas
« Last Edit: January 07, 2009, 09:08:58 PM by JConk007 »
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Offline JConk007

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #124 on: January 07, 2009, 09:02:19 PM »
I made a sauce with 6 in 1 as the base, and shredded block sorrento mozzarella Nice crust fluffy  and cooked Nicely all the Way Through, almost cake like, a crisp  bottom from the oil, and great flavor without being soggy or drenched in oil!
« Last Edit: January 07, 2009, 09:16:08 PM by JConk007 »
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Offline TronCarter

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #125 on: January 08, 2009, 07:59:38 AM »
JConk007, It looks like you are on the right track, but agree that there is too much dough.  A 9-inch round pan is essentially the same area as the 8-inch square pans that I use.  I use ~8.6 oz of dough per pan and it comes out just about right (for me).  You might want to try to shoot for something around that weight for each dough ball.   

Good luck.

Tron

Offline haybot

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #126 on: January 30, 2009, 09:11:11 AM »
Just a short question, the recipe states that the pizza should be baked on a pizza stone. But still in the pan right ? If i don't have a pizza stone, should i pre bake the dough before adding sauce and cheese to  make shure that the crust ist right before the cheese is all black?

Offline TronCarter

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #127 on: January 30, 2009, 09:32:36 AM »
Yes, in the pan on the stone.  The stone will provide a thermal mass and store up heat and then release it into the pan and pizza for a long time, otherwise the bottom will not get done.

Pre-baking is a good thought, but I don't know about the heating, cooling, heating when you are basically frying the dough in the pan oil.  I think I would cook for a longer time, but cover the top with foil for part of the cooking time, that way the top won't burn while you are waiting for the bottom to brown.  For me, with a stone it takes 10 minutes, so without a stone I would maybe go 10 minutes on the bottom rack, and then cover with foil and go another 10.

Offline Randy

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #128 on: February 18, 2009, 01:58:23 PM »
I'm not sure why, but for some reason I never got around to trying this recipe.  Could have been the amount of oil used but still, once would not hurt.  I have  it in the cooler now for tonight.  Once I remove the pan with risen dough what do I do next?  That is do I press it down in the center as one post suggested?

Randy

Offline TronCarter

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #129 on: February 18, 2009, 03:01:59 PM »
Once you take it out of the cooler, if it is not fully pressed out, do it right away, and then leave it alone.

I would remove it from the cooler at least 3 hours before you plan to use it.  Let it warm up to at least room temperature.  My house is cool and dry in the winter, so I usually let it rise in the oven with the heat off, but oven light on.  That will give it an extra 10 degrees or so.  I also cover the pan with foil to keep the top from drying out.  This will allow the dough to proof up nicely and then you are ready to add toppings.  Don't get too rough with it at this point because any unnecessary poking and prodding will flatten the dough out.

Although a slightly different recipe, I talk about letting the dough rise in the pan, etc here:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5656.msg62496.html#msg62496

and some pictures of the process and end result here:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5656.msg62551.html#msg62551


Offline Randy

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #130 on: February 18, 2009, 03:23:41 PM »
Sounds good, I will give that a try.

Randy

Offline Randy

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #131 on: February 19, 2009, 06:15:29 AM »
It was one of those nights.  As I put the topping on the pizza, the glass door on the oven looked like an outside window during a lightning storm.  The electric element burned through. 

Fortunately, we have a counter top convection oven that geld the 10" cake pan I was using.  The pizza came out well for a toaster oven.

This recipe is surprisingly good and is as noted in so many other post a perfect match for the Pizza Hut version from the old days.

Randy

Offline nosauce

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #132 on: March 19, 2009, 08:36:46 PM »
Can anyone tell me what kind of pan is best for baking pan pizza?  Can you make the pan pizza on the pizza peel and then slide it onto the pizza stone?  If using a cast iron skillet to bake the pizza in do you put it on the pizza stone or just in the oven on the lower rack?  Will a stainless steel pan cook the pizza as well (I am trying to stay away from aluminum as I just found out the aluminum in my body is off the chart)?  I appreciate any help anyone can give me.  Thanks!

Offline TronCarter

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #133 on: March 20, 2009, 07:15:23 AM »
When it comes to pizza pans, darker is better.  If you are using a pan, you really don't need a peel, you can just use your hand to put the pan on the stone.  Although I have never tried a cast iron skillet, I am sure you would want to put it on the stone.  There is a large thermal mass to the cast iron and you want to get heat into it as quickly as possible, otherwise the bottom will never get done in time.  Stainless pans are usually bright and shiny.  This will reflect heat instead of absorb it, so the bottom will never get done. 

Tron

Offline Boston BBQ-za

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #134 on: September 05, 2009, 09:49:21 AM »
Although my wife enjoys a lot of my newly created pies, she does enjoy pizza hut so I tired this last night, since I just got in my new PSTK pan from pizzatools.com. I'll give my run down of what I did and my thoughts for you all. 
Ingredients wise, I followed the original recipe exactly and I found the dough came together very nicely in the mixer, especially with the addition of the 2T of oil.  I only used around 3 T of veg oil on the bottom of my pan due to the previous responses about potentially too much oil.  Also, since the bottom diameter of my pan is 15.25", I also figured that I could use all the dough.  After rolling it out, I plated into my pan, covered and put directly in the refrigerator. (This is where I deviated from the recipe.. not letting rise to 1.5'' before putting in the fridge) The dough initally was fairly thin and only rolled out to approx 2 inches from the end of the pan.  This was all on Sep. 3. On Sep 4, I stretched the dough to the edges mid morning and put back in the fridge. 
At around 4:00, I took the pan out of the fridge and left on the countertop.  Oven was turned on at 5:50 and the pie was put in at 6:30 at 450deg, 2nd to bottom rack on 4 x 8'' unglazed quarry tiles.  The pie cooked for exactly 15 min. 
For my sauce, I used the 6-1 tomatoes with 1tsp basil, oregano, garlic salt and 1/2-3/4 tsp marjoram.  I blanched my boars head pepperoni for 4 min in boiling water prior to cutting and putting on the pizza and I used the 4 cheese mixture from trader joes.

I didn't tell my wife that I was making a Pizza hut clone and while eating it, I asked her whether it tasted similar to any type of pizza.  She said it reminded her of Pizza hut. 

All things considered, I liked this recipe and it is very easy to do/replicate if this is the style pizza you're trying to do.  I found the dough just slightly dry and wonder whether I would add a little more oil to the pan next time or slightly increase the amount of water in the dough.  This pan seems to be just the right size for this amount of dough.  The pie was a little over an inch thick at the crust but not too thick throughout. The timing in the oven was perfect and the crust was nicely browned on the top crust and underside.  I think next time I would blanch the pepperoni a little longer because as you can see, I still had some decent grease pools on top of the pizza.   Also, I thought the 6-1 tomatoes would replicate pizza hut more than san marzano, but my wife and I both agree that we like the san marzano taste better.  also, if I had to do it over again, I may go a little lighter on the cheese.
Note, the last picture is after degreasing with a paper towl.


Offline dicepackage

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #135 on: November 22, 2009, 08:32:04 PM »
Does anyone know the thickness factor for this dough?  I would love to be able to accurately scale this to other sizes.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #136 on: November 22, 2009, 09:14:20 PM »
Does anyone know the thickness factor for this dough?  I would love to be able to accurately scale this to other sizes.

That's a tricky one. The weight of the ingredients for the basic recipe as given at http://www.pizzamaking.com/panpizza.php comes to 37.39 ounces. That is for a dough piece that is shaped to 12" and placed in a 14" pan. I think I would use the 14" size to calculate the thickness factor since that is the final size of the pizza.

Some members have found the basic recipe to produce more dough than they would like. Some time ago, based on information provided by a Pizza Hut manager on dough weights and pan sizes, I converted the basic PH clone recipe to conform to those numbers, at Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909. See also http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6040.0.html. I didn't calculate a thickness factor for the modified version of the PH clone recipe but I think I would use the final pan size to calculate it, rather than the smaller dough piece that is smaller than the pan size.

If the basic PH recipe is used, in scaling to a different size I think I would try to keep the dough skin thickness to 3/4", which is the thickness recited in the basic PH recipe.

Peter

Offline dicepackage

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #137 on: November 23, 2009, 01:33:38 AM »
Thanks for the help but I think it is best to stick with my current method of calculating the area to scale down.

Offline Essen1

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #138 on: November 23, 2009, 02:32:19 AM »
Thanks for the help but I think it is best to stick with my current method of calculating the area to scale down.

Which is...?  ???
Mike

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Offline dicepackage

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #139 on: November 23, 2009, 10:45:31 PM »
Basically I take the mathematical way of finding the area.

Find the area of the 14-inch
14/2 = 7
r^2 *pi
7^2 * 3.1415
49 * 3.1415
Area = 153.9335

Find the area of the other pan.  In my case a 9-inch
9/2 = 4.5
4.5^2 * 3.1415
20.25 * 3.1415
Area = 63.615375

Divide the area of the pan you want to cook with by the pan the recipe uses
63.615375 / 153.9335 = .413265306

Multiply each of the ingredients in the list by .41 and use that measurement.  Recipes scale differently so this isn't an entirely accurate method for reproduction but it is close enough for me most of the time.


 

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