Author Topic: NY style sauce  (Read 782 times)

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Offline Josh123

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NY style sauce
« on: August 05, 2016, 12:06:45 AM »
I've been attempting to make NY style slice pies, but cannot nail down a sauce that works. I've been using San Marzanos with just basil and some kosher salt, but it gives the pie too much of a "fresh" taste when I'm looking for more zip and tang. Anyone have a good go to?

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: NY style sauce
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2016, 12:19:53 AM »
Try using Sclafani crushed or 6-in-1 tomatoes; and try using oregano instead of basil or in addition to.
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Offline petef

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Re: NY style sauce
« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2016, 02:37:19 AM »
I've been attempting to make NY style slice pies, but cannot nail down a sauce that works. I've been using San Marzanos with just basil and some kosher salt, but it gives the pie too much of a "fresh" taste when I'm looking for more zip and tang. Anyone have a good go to?

That zip and tang you are referring to is most likely acidity. On sauce for 1 pie, try adding 1 ts white vinegar and balance it off with either 1 ts white sugar or 4 ts of classic coke. You can also add add just a sprinkle of finely ground red hot pepper flakes.

Some people add anchovies to the sauce, but I don't like it. I can taste the very slight hint of fishy taste.

Also, to rid some of that "fresh taste" you can cook the sauce and keep tasting it every few minutes. Remove from heat when that fresh taste loses it's edge.

the trick that works best for me is to cook half the sauce with all your favorite ingredients and then add an equal amount of uncooked tomatoes. Hit that with a stick blender. If it's still too fresh tasting, bring it to a boil and remove from the heat.

-pete-
« Last Edit: August 05, 2016, 02:45:04 AM by petef »

Offline Minolta Rokkor

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Re: NY style sauce
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2016, 01:52:40 PM »
Yup agree with Craig, Sclafani is very potent in flavor compared to San Marzanos.
Another good brand is Jersey Fresh imo, slightly milder than sclafani

Offline TonyRicci

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Re: NY style sauce
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2016, 03:25:22 PM »
I would cut way back on the basil and add oregano and garlic. 

Offline HarryHaller73

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Re: NY style sauce
« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2016, 01:13:46 PM »
I've been attempting to make NY style slice pies, but cannot nail down a sauce that works. I've been using San Marzanos with just basil and some kosher salt, but it gives the pie too much of a "fresh" taste when I'm looking for more zip and tang. Anyone have a good go to?

josh123, i agree, just adding canned tomato whether san marzano, jersey or CA tomatoes with some dried herbs and salt won't get you the same kind of sauce you find in some of the better pizzerias in NYC.  i believe there is a place for fresh uncooked canned tomatoes in pizzas like margherita style and many operators use it on their nyc style pies, but the old school pizzerias in nyc still use a cooked sauce or a hybrid mixing cooked and uncooked.  there is usually a protein based glutamate, some places used to use anchovy filet or paste as a glutamate, or parmigiano reggiano, or pork bones, or beef stock.. many just use monosodium glutamate products/cubes/powder now.  next, an acid ie lemon juice or tart fruit juice, or red wine vinegar.  a sweetener is also added, usually sugar or honey.  and then dried or fresh herbs, primarily oregano and basil.  salt and pepper.  maybe a little garlic.  simmered, and sometimes fresh canned puree added when finished for brightness.  most new places don't do this anymore because the workflow is too arduous and use out of the can products.

each pizzeria used to have their unique sauce flavor and really what made each pizzeria different.  i'm one who believe the sauce is more important than the crust, since the crust isn't really about flavor and not as much permutation, really is just hydration and oil differences.  sauce ingredients are less well known than pizza dough/crust recipes.  i remember back in the 90's entire pizzerias used to be bought just for a sauce recipe.


« Last Edit: August 13, 2016, 01:28:56 PM by HarryHaller73 »

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: NY style sauce
« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2016, 01:21:58 PM »
i'm one who believe the sauce is more important than the crust, since the crust isn't really about flavor and not as much permutation, really is just hydration and oil differences.

20 years ago, there were probably a lot of folks who would agree.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline carl333

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Re: NY style sauce
« Reply #7 on: August 13, 2016, 01:24:29 PM »
josh123, i agree, just adding canned tomato whether san marzano, jersey or CA tomatoes with some dried herbs and salt won't get you the same kind of sauce you find in some of the better pizzerias in NYC.  i believe there is a place for fresh uncooked canned tomatoes in pizzas like margherita style and many operators use it on their nyc style pies, but the old school pizzerias in nyc still use a cooked sauce or a hybrid mixing cooked and uncooked.  there is usually a protein based glutamate, some places used to use anchovy filet or paste as a glutamate, or pork bones, or beef stock.. many just use monosodium glutamate products/cubes/powder now.  next, an acid ie lemon juice or tart fruit juice, or red wine vinegar.  a sweetener is also added, usually sugar or honey.  and then dried or fresh herbs, primarily oregano and basil.  salt and pepper.  maybe a little garlic.  simmered, and sometimes fresh canned puree added when finished for brightness.  most new places don't do this anymore because the workflow is too arduous and use out of the can products.

each pizzeria used to have their unique sauce flavor and really what made each pizzeria different.  i'm one who believe the sauce is more important than the crust, since the crust isn't really about flavor and not as much permutation, really is just hydration and oil differences.  sauce ingredients are less well known than pizza dough/crust recipes.  i remember back in the 90's entire pizzerias used to be bought just for a sauce recipe.

Curious. What's your favorite sauce recipe for NY style pizza?
Carl

Offline HarryHaller73

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Re: NY style sauce
« Reply #8 on: August 13, 2016, 01:43:45 PM »
Curious. What's your favorite sauce recipe for NY style pizza?

i use sclafani as craig mentioned for ny pizza.
and when i mean cooked, i don't mean hours and hours, but for 20 minutes or so.  it takes the rawness out and rounds out the tomato flavor.  however  i find overcooking tomatoes degrades the flavor. 

the sauce i use for ny pizza basically goes olive oil till smoking, and then canned crushed tomato, do not stir for 5 minutes (this is important) and will be bubbling intensely and carmelizes the bottom tomatoes. 

lower heat, then add something called ajinimoto, which is basically MSG or if want to avoid that, anchovy filets, grated parmigiano reggiano, both as natural glutamates, squeeze of fresh lemon, honey or brown sugar, salt, pepper, both dried greek and fresh oregano, dried basil, about 3x more oregano than basil, halved roasted onion, to be discarded after, and hot pepper extract or crushed red pepper. and finally a bit of unsalted italian butter.  you shouldn't identify butter flavor, it just rounds the flavors.  i don't use exact measurements.

cool, and refrigerate overnight.  the flavors come together better next day and even better after 2 days.

 
« Last Edit: August 13, 2016, 08:07:26 PM by HarryHaller73 »

Offline HarryHaller73

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Re: NY style sauce
« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2016, 01:54:01 PM »
another thing i like to do is order a stromboli or calzone at my favorite pizzerias which are served with their pizza sauce on the side.  i get a good idea of what components are in that pizza sauce by tasting it on it's own, some are much sweeter, some more saltier, etc.  and you'll find that it's often not just uncooked canned tomato with some salt and oregano.  more hearty, more zesty.
btw, i use uncooked sauces for other kinds of pizzas, so just saying.

« Last Edit: August 13, 2016, 08:21:57 PM by HarryHaller73 »

Offline Ovenray

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Re: NY style sauce
« Reply #10 on: August 13, 2016, 02:13:18 PM »
I always use fresh tomatoes but also add about 5 to 10 gram of (shredded) sundried tomatoes (per pizza portion) to the sauce which I (softly) cook up for about 20 to 30 minutes total time. The sundried tomatoes add lots of interesting flavor to the sauce but as a consequence I dont add salt as sundried tomatoes generally allready contain 5% seasalt.
I'm grateful for all things learned from you folks.

Offline NYCook

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Re: NY style sauce
« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2016, 09:10:13 AM »
Hi, I'm new but felt qualified enough to throw my hat in the ring here having worked in pizzerias in NYC much of my young adult life. A lot of people use thinned out tomato paste. Roughly 1 can paste 1 can water. Salt sugar, oregano. More sugar than you would think. It really helps the tomatoes pop. I can still remember them making and mixing it in giant garbage cans. Clean new ones obviously. If you are going for your classic NYC style run of the mill pizza that's probably your best bet. I don't mind it but personally I strain a can of whole peeled tomatoes, run it through a food mill, a blender or food processor adds to much air to the sauce, and season it with salt, sugar and oregano to taste.


Online the1mu

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Re: NY style sauce
« Reply #12 on: September 19, 2016, 09:56:57 AM »
Hi, I'm new but felt qualified enough to throw my hat in the ring here having worked in pizzerias in NYC much of my young adult life. A lot of people use thinned out tomato paste. Roughly 1 can paste 1 can water. Salt sugar, oregano. More sugar than you would think. It really helps the tomatoes pop. I can still remember them making and mixing it in giant garbage cans. Clean new ones obviously. If you are going for your classic NYC style run of the mill pizza that's probably your best bet. I don't mind it but personally I strain a can of whole peeled tomatoes, run it through a food mill, a blender or food processor adds to much air to the sauce, and season it with salt, sugar and oregano to taste.

Curious if they used any oil?


 

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