Author Topic: Re: The Origin of Different foods  (Read 60 times)

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Online slybarman

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Re: Re: The Origin of Different foods
« Reply #20 on: August 20, 2014, 06:40:18 PM »
Come to think of it Oscar meyer does have a tutonic ring.


Offline parallei

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Re: Re: The Origin of Different foods
« Reply #21 on: August 20, 2014, 07:07:37 PM »
Come to think of it Oscar meyer does have a tutonic ring.

Maybe so, but Bologna = Bologna!

Once, we were in Bologna (the City) walking down the street and my wife stopped me in front of a Salumeria and said:

"Look! Weapons-grade Mortadella!"

It was bigger than this.  It is used ground up or diced and used in many dishes (like Tortellini) in Emilia Romagna.




Online slybarman

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Re: Re: The Origin of Different foods
« Reply #22 on: August 20, 2014, 07:13:03 PM »


"Look! Weapons-grade Mortadella!"


LOL. Funny lady.

Offline Essen1

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Re: Re: The Origin of Different foods
« Reply #23 on: August 20, 2014, 08:47:04 PM »
Maybe, but I doubt it.


Of course.  ;D

However, that's what they are called after...the cut, not the country.
Mike

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Offline Essen1

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Re: Re: The Origin of Different foods
« Reply #24 on: August 20, 2014, 08:50:34 PM »
I'm bored too, and according to the Oxford English Dictionary via Wiki, the use of the phrase "french fried potato" predates the use of "frenched" as in julienning.

Wiki has a different theory: "Some people believe that the term "French" was introduced when British and American soldiers arrived in Belgium during World War I and consequently tasted Belgian fries. They supposedly called them "French", as it was the local language and official language of the Belgian Army at that time, believing themselves to be in France."

Yes, that's nonsense and should be corrected by Wiki.

Take a trip and see for yourself is my suggestion.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Essen1

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Re: Re: The Origin of Different foods
« Reply #25 on: August 20, 2014, 08:51:59 PM »
Maybe so, but Bologna = Bologna!

Once, we were in Bologna (the City) walking down the street and my wife stopped me in front of a Salumeria and said:

"Look! Weapons-grade Mortadella!"

It was bigger than this.  It is used ground up or diced and used in many dishes (like Tortellini) in Emilia Romagna.

Lmao!  ;D

What's next? That someone claims Spaghetti Bolognese originated in Bologna, too?
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Re: The Origin of Different foods
« Reply #26 on: August 20, 2014, 08:59:36 PM »
Yes, that's nonsense and should be corrected by Wiki.

Take a trip and see for yourself is my suggestion.

I'll get right on that...  ::)
Pizza is not bread.

Offline parallei

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Re: Re: The Origin of Different foods
« Reply #27 on: August 20, 2014, 11:14:59 PM »
Lmao!  ;D

What's next? That someone claims Spaghetti Bolognese originated in Bologna, too?

Yep!  Or at least somebody claims so:

"The earliest documented recipe of an Italian meat-based sauce (ragł) served with pasta comes from late 18th century Imola, near Bologna. In 1891 Pellegrino Artusi first published a recipe for a meat sauce characterized as being "bolognese". While many traditional variations do exist, in 1982 the Italian Academy of Cuisine registered a recipe for authentic ragł alla bolognese with the Bologna Chamber of Commerce (incorporating some fresh pancetta and a little milk). In Italy, ragł alla bolognese is often referred to simply as ragł."

Who knows?