Author Topic: yeast vs sourdough - microspotting difference?  (Read 1211 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline dylandylan

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1023
  • Location: Dunedin, New Zealand
yeast vs sourdough - microspotting difference?
« on: December 23, 2012, 12:39:00 PM »
Hi all,  last night I experimented with half of my pizzas using a yeast-based dough, and the other half were sourdough based.

The evening was a bit of a blur with guests and it being my first time using a WFO, so I wasn't as methodical and didn't take as many photos as I might have liked.  Anyway...

I'm sure that I noticed at some point that the sourdough pizzas produced fine microspots, whereas the fresh yeast pizzas did not.  Can anyone else confirm this??


Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 12515
  • Location: Durham,NC
  • Easy peazzy
Re: yeast vs sourdough - microspotting difference?
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2012, 11:03:03 PM »
I don't believe that is a yeast factor per say. A well timed/fermented dough that "works" properly can/will display those 'lil blisters even at only 500 degrees on a cracker crust(for example).
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline dylandylan

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1023
  • Location: Dunedin, New Zealand
Re: yeast vs sourdough - microspotting difference?
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2012, 04:21:22 AM »
Ok thanks, interesting.  Yes the timing of the dough that turned out with microspots was a bit different, I think I hadn't left them as long after balling before baking.   I don't know if they're a good thing or not but will try to coax more of them out.

Online TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 16267
  • Location: Houston, TX
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: yeast vs sourdough - microspotting difference?
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2012, 10:00:37 AM »
The dough chemistry is very different between SD and commercial yeast. Notwithstanding, you can produce microspotting (or macrospotting) with either - there are plenty of pictures here to prove it. The choice of yeast is only one of many contributing factors.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage