Author Topic: Shakey's nutrition, a clue?  (Read 3948 times)

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Offline elsegundo

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Shakey's nutrition, a clue?
« on: January 04, 2006, 02:19:53 PM »
pete-zza

I came across this at a site called calorieKing for Shakey's cheese pizza slice


Calories 135      ( Kilojoules 564 )

    % Daily
Value*
Total Fat 5 g           8%
 Saturated Fat 3 g 15%
Cholesterol 15 mg   5%
Sodium 320 mg      13%
Total Carbohydrates 13 g 4%
   Dietary Fiber - 0%
   Sugars -   
Protein 8 g   
Note: A dash indicates no data is available.
 
calorieking.com/foods/food/carbs-calories-in-shakeys-12-pizza-cheese-only-thin-crust


Shakey's is the holy grail to me. If this lends any light on whats in the dough I would appreciate any insight you have.It looks as if there is no sugar. I see salt and I think Crisco (by any name).

What's your take.

Thank you greatly.


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Shakey's nutrition, a clue?
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2006, 03:06:52 PM »
elsegundo,

I have seen similar type of nutrition information many times before. You will often see it in documents that schools and other public entities require of vendors as a pre-condition to their selling their goods to such entities. You will also see that type of information at vegan/allergy/dieting websites and at the websites of many of the big pizza companies such as Pizza Hut. Unfortunately, the nutrition information for the dough all by itself, or even a simple ingredient list, is rarely given--only dough plus whatever is put on it (cheese, sauce and toppings). If the dough-only specifics were given, you would be able to glean some useful tidbits that might help you deconstruct the dough formulation, such as the amount of fat and sugar per serving, which could then be extrapolated to the full amount of the dough. There are not enough clues in the information you provided.

Peter

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Re: Shakey's nutrition, a clue?
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2008, 01:22:53 PM »
elsegundo,

Some time ago, you presented nutrition data in this thread for the Shakey's thin crust cheese pizza. Today, while doing some research on Shakey's thin crust cheese pizza, I came across essentially the same nutrition data you previously presented. Today, I found it at http://www.dietfacts.com/html/nutrition-facts/shakeys-thin-crust-cheese-pizza-12-inch-5366.htm. The nutrition data is for a 12" thin crust cheese pizza, effective as of 8/24/01. So, the nutrition data appears to be for an older version of that pizza. I know that since that time, Shakey's has gone to whole milk (I assume part-skim) mozzarella cheese.

What caught my eye in the Shakey's nutrition data that I found is that the data is for one slice, or 1/10th of a whole pizza. On that basis, the total fat for an entire pizza would be 50 grams, and the total protein would be 80 grams. Since the sauce is unlikely to contain any fat (at least based on the sauce ingredients list you provided on another thread), that means that the total fat of 50 grams must come from fat in the dough and fat from the cheese. In like fashion, the total protein of 80 grams must come from the protein in the dough, the protein in the cheese, and a small amount of protein in the sauce. Based on the above analysis, I was wondering whether you can tell me if a typical 12" Shakey's thin crust cheese pizza comes with a lot or little cheese and, similarly, whether it comes with a lot or little sauce. Maybe you can even estimate the amounts (e.g, by ounces or grams).

Preliminarily, based on the numbers I have examined, I am inclined to believe that the Shakey's flour is either high-gluten flour or bread flour. It's hard to say for sure based on the nutrition data. I used the nutritiondata.com website to get the nutrition data for whole-milk mozzarella cheese but it is possible that the cheese that Shakey's is using is a higher protein product. It's also possible that the nutrition data I found (and that you earlier found) is not correct. I recently discovered that that can happen when I had several email exchanges with a representative of Monical's in relation to their pizzas over a conflict of data between the Monical's nutrition data and the nutrition data presented by another website like the one referenced above.

As a final observation, because of the high levels of fat and protein in the nutrition data, it is possible that the Shakey's dough includes a dried milk powder. If so, there would be a protein and fat contribution by that ingredient. The amount of protein and fat would depend on the amount used. I haven't looked into the possibility that a whey product is used but that is also a possibillity although whey contains no fat and a smaller amount of protein.

Peter
« Last Edit: February 02, 2008, 04:35:34 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline elsegundo

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Re: Shakey's nutrition, a clue?
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2008, 07:21:27 PM »
Peter-

You certainly do persue an investigation- that's great.

Shakey's puts on a minimal amount of cheese. It used to annoy one of my friends.

At the time I posted I was going after the sugar. Ingredients:

Flour - they use a lower protein based on the fact that the dough shows little of that elasticity and stretch that high gluten produces, Shakey's was after a product for beer and fun rather than a meal.  I would guess that they almost use an all-purpose grade but that is just a guess.

fat - shortening for the convenience. We think we know that from vegan inquiries.

salt - must have some but never detectable

yeast - don't know

milk or whey - when they first started, dry milk was more commonly used.  Whey increases the protein I believe. Similar styles of pizza use nonfat milk- Round Table or whey - Straw Hat.  Sorry about the California references.

So the sugar, which is what I was going for back in 2006, either they don't list it in the web site or they don't use it. That is what I was asking based on the ingredients list.  As you know probably better than anyone,  sugar can be troublesome. It speeds up the yeast, adds to browning, and then can send everything haywire over 2-3 days.  It can exhaust the yeast. Problems.

So for sugar I just don't know.

Their dough was sheeted and folded as referenced in a post about the Redlands Shakey's. It said the owner there used to work at the original and still uses the folding technique that the original used.

Peter - you're still the best pizza man

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Shakey's nutrition, a clue?
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2008, 08:41:50 PM »
elsegundo,

I have been playing around a lot lately with nutrition data to see how much can be ascertained about pizzas from such data. Analyzing nutrition data is not something that I am particularly equipped to do by way of background or training, but sometimes it is the only information available. Whereas some pizza chains will give you detailed and accurate nutrition data or a list of ingredients (usually it is one or the other and rarely both), Shakey’s gives you neither.  That means that you have to rely on data provided by nutrition-oriented websites such as the one I referenced earlier or information gleaned from customers or former employees. 

If the data I found today is correct, then it looks like there may be a source of protein in the pizza beyond the protein in the flour and the protein in the cheese (there is a lot in the cheese) and in the sauce (there is only a small amount in the sauce). But if the cheese is used sparingly on a Shakey’s cheese pizza, as you mentioned, that leaves a fairly big protein gap that may be difficult to close. I think it would take a lot of dried milk powder to do it. Sugar is always a problem because there can be sugar in the dough and sugar in the sauce, and sugar is lumped together in the nutrition data with other carbohydrates, including the starch in flour and soluble and insoluble fiber. Fat can be present in the dough, both in the flour itself (a small amount) and in the cheese (usually a lot) and even in the sauce. Salt (sodium) can similarly be present in the dough, in the cheese and in the sauce. Yeast is not isolated because the regulations don’t require it. As you can see, trying to put the ingredient quantities in the right place is not easy.

Since I have had a lot of fun and learned a lot recently about crispy/cracker crusts, I plan at some point to try the Shoney’s “clone” recipe you posted at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6170.msg53165.html#msg53165 (Reply 8). I converted the recipe to baker’s percent format and scaled it down by half to be more readily usable by me. I may try the recipe twice—once using my pasta machine and the second time using the dough warming method I developed recently. I may even try a scaled down version of Steve’s Shakey’s clone without the yeast.

The dough formulation I came up with as a result of using your recipe with the enhanced dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html is as follows:

Flour (100%):
Water (43.75%):
IDY (1.32812%):
Salt (1.8457%):
Sugar (0.8789%):
Baker's Non-Fat Dry Milk (0.85978%):
Shortening (2.64251%):
Total (151.30501%):
229.07 g  |  8.08 oz | 0.5 lbs
100.22 g  |  3.53 oz | 0.22 lbs
3.04 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.01 tsp | 0.34 tbsp
4.23 g | 0.15 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.76 tsp | 0.25 tbsp
2.01 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.5 tsp | 0.17 tbsp
1.97 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.5 tsp | 0.17 tbsp
6.05 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.51 tsp | 0.5 tbsp
346.59 g | 12.23 oz | 0.76 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: Bowl residue compensation is 1%

Of course, I won’t know what I will have accomplished because I have never had a Shakey’s pizza. But so long as the pizzas taste good, I will be satisfied.

BTW, when you form the skins using your recipe, how large (diameter) do you make the skins? From that information, I should be able to determine the thickness factor.

Peter
« Last Edit: February 02, 2008, 08:58:29 PM by Pete-zza »