Author Topic: Need Dough Recipe for an Event  (Read 573 times)

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Offline drewsky6

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Need Dough Recipe for an Event
« on: June 05, 2014, 01:06:24 PM »
I am going to be taking my Blackstone pizza oven to an event where I need to cook about 40-50 pies in about a 3 hour period. It will just be me doing the pizza-making, maybe with a friend to take orders and hand out the finished pies. I have never done pizza for this many people before.

So I am looking for a dough recipe that meats as many of these criterion as possible:

1) Can be made using a no-knead method. My Kitchenaid can only do about 1 kilo of flour at a time, and I think I need to make 5x that.
2) Does a cold rise. Since I am going to be doing this outdoors, I would love to have about half of the dough ready to go at room temp at the start, and the other half cold.
3) Uses regular flour - either all purpose or bread flour. I don't have easy or cheap access to Caputo 00 or whatever.
4) Uses instant yeast. I don't have a starter, and I have never used one before. So for this event, I would like to stick with something completely familiar and reliable.
5) Isn't overly hydrated. It could be really warm, and I need to handle the dough quickly and easily. The less sticking the better.
5) Works for a 3-minute bake. I want a relatively fast bake, good oven spring, and a crisp undercarriage. People are going to be sitting on the grass and eating, so I don't want the floppiness and moistness of a Neapolitan. Probably something that is a cross of New York and Neapolitan would be ideal.

I know this is a tall order, with a lot of specific requirements. I appreciate any help you can give.

Left to my own devices, I would probably start with the Lahey No-Knead recipe and just dial back on the water a bit (maybe to 65%). Then I would let it rise at room temp for about 8-10 hours before putting it in the refrigerator for 3 days. I don't think I would get enough gluten development if I put it in the refrigerator straight away.

Thanks,

Andy


Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Need Dough Recipe for an Event
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2014, 02:59:01 PM »
Here's a formula and procedure that we use all the time and it performs just as you have asked.
Flour: 100% (bread flour)
Salt: 2%
Sugar: 1%
Olive oil: 2%
IDY: 0.75% (hydrate in a small amount of warm (95F) water.
Water: 58% (80F)

Procedure:
Put water in mixing bowl, add sugar and salt followed by the yeast suspension. Whisk together very briefly. Add the oil and whisk once again immediately followed by the flour. Stir the flour into the liquid until the flour is hydrated, this normally takes a few minutes. Turn out onto a floured bench/counter top, oil a suitably sized bowl/container. Note: A 30-gallon trash container with a food contact approved plastic liner should work well for the formula given below. In this case be sure to oil the dough before dropping it into the lined trash container as this will prevent the dough from sticking to the plastic bag when you go to remove the dough.
Place the dough into the oiled container and drape with a sheet of plastic.
Allow to ferment at room temperature for 2-hours then turn the dough out onto a floured counter top and scale into desired weight pieces.
Form each dough piece into a ball, wipe with salad oil and place into individual plastic bags.
Place all of the dough balls into the fridge to cold ferment overnight.
On the following day transport the dough in a cooler to the event site.
Remove what you will initially need and allow to warm to 50F (about 1-hour for individual size pizzas).
Open dough balls into pizza skins by hand, dress and bake to the order. The dough balls are good for up to 3-hours after they have reached 50F.
Remove remainder of dough as needed and process in the same manner.
To convert percentages into weight measures grab your calculator and follow along;
Enter the weight of flour you want to use (remember that the weight of the ingredient will be shown in the same weight units as the flour weight is expressed in)
After entering the flour weight press "X" and then enter the ingredient percent you want to find the weight for, now press the "%" key and read the weight in the display. Example: Flour weight is 7-pounds (7 X 16 = 112-ounces) all ingredient weights will now be in ounces.
Salt: 2% (112 X 2 (press the "%" key and read 2.24-ounces in the display. Round to 2.25-ounces of salt.
More math fun:
Add up all of the percentages in the dough formula (163.75 for the above formula).
Divide 163.75 by 100 = 1.6375
Decide what the individual dough ball weight will be, lets say 4-ounces each.
Decide how many dough balls you want to make, lets say 60 to be safe.
Yow will need to make at least 60 X 4-ounces or 240-ounces of dough for this order.
To find how much flour you will need to base your dough on simply divide the total dough weight (240-ounces) by 1.6375 = 146.56-ounces (round this up to the next whole unit so it now becomes 147-ounces. You will need to base your dough on a total of 147-ounces of flour.
Salt: 2% 147 X 2 (press the "%" key) read 2.94 (call it 3-ounces of salt)
Sugar: 1% 147 X 1 (press the "%" key) read 1.47 (call it 1.5-ounces of sugar
Olive oil: 2% 147 X 2 (press the "%" key) read 2.94 (call it 3-ounces of oil)
IDY: 0.75% 147 X 0.75 (press the "%" key) and read 1.10 (call it 1-ounce of IDY)
Water: 58% 147 X 58 (press the "%" key) read 85.26 (call it 85.25-ounces of water or 5.33-pounds of water)

Good luck with your pizza gig!
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Need Dough Recipe for an Event
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2014, 03:33:57 PM »
Andy,

If you want to play around with different dough ball weights or to change the number of dough balls, you can use the Lehmann dough calculating tool or expanded dough calculating tool as noted at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dough_tools.html. I usually use the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html. I plugged Tom's numbers into the expanded dough calculating tool and got the following:

Flour (100%):
Water (58%):
IDY (0.75%):
Salt (2%):
Olive Oil (2%):
Sugar (1%):
Total (163.75%):
Single Ball:
4155.11 g  |  146.56 oz | 9.16 lbs
2409.97 g  |  85.01 oz | 5.31 lbs
31.16 g | 1.1 oz | 0.07 lbs | 10.35 tsp | 3.45 tbsp
83.1 g | 2.93 oz | 0.18 lbs | 4.96 tbsp | 0.31 cups
83.1 g | 2.93 oz | 0.18 lbs | 6.16 tbsp | 0.38 cups
41.55 g | 1.47 oz | 0.09 lbs | 10.42 tsp | 3.47 tbsp
6804 g | 240 oz | 15 lbs | TF = N/A
113.4 g | 4 oz | 0.25 lbs

With the above tools, you can also add a bowl residue compensation to compensate for minor losses during preparation of the dough. I typically recommend around 1.5%, and scale the dough balls to the desired value.

I was originally involved in the design of the abovementioned tools (plus the others). I learned how to do that from reading Tom's articles starting over ten years ago. It took another member (Mike/Boy Hits Car) who was skilled in programming to do all of the programming work to take the tools from the calculator or Excel stage to something that people could use with ease by just plugging in the numbers.

Peter



Offline drewsky6

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Re: Need Dough Recipe for an Event
« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2014, 07:11:25 AM »
Wow - thank you for the quick reply.

I have a couple questions to follow up.

Is there any advantage or disadvantage to cold fermenting for longer? If I do, say, 3 days, could I or should I omit the sugar?

I am unsure about the size of pizza I should be doing. I think I want pizzas that would feed two normal people or one hungry person. Does that sound right for an 11-inch pie? Or should i go bigger or smaller?

And if there anything that shows the proper weight for a pie that size if it will have thin crust? What thickness factor should I enter in the calculator?

Thanks.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Need Dough Recipe for an Event
« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2014, 08:23:03 AM »
Andy,

If you go to a three-day cold ferment, 0.75% IDY might be too much. It is hard to say precisely how much IDY should be used, but maybe something around 0.375%. For a three-day cold ferment, Tom usually recommends that sugar be added to the dough. At 1% sugar, or maybe even at 2%, I think you should be OK. 

As for a thickness factor (Tom refers to it as a density loading factor), for a cross between NY and Neapolitan style, you might use a thickness factor of around 0.083. For that value, the dough ball weight for a 11" pizza would be 3.14159 x 6.5 x 6.5 x 0.083 = 11 ounces.

Since Tom gave you the dough formulation and knows it well, he may have his own suggestions relative to going to a three-day cold ferment.

Peter

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Need Dough Recipe for an Event
« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2014, 01:06:20 PM »
I am unsure about the size of pizza I should be doing. I think I want pizzas that would feed two normal people or one hungry person. Does that sound right for an 11-inch pie? Or should i go bigger or smaller?

The smaller you make the pizzas, the more pizzas you'll have to make. The more pizzas you have to make, the more work. You're already making a ton of pizza, so why make the pizzas any smaller than the largest size your equipment will allow you to make?

I'd make them at least 14" (assuming the stone in the Blackstone is about 16"). For 14" NY style pizzas, I use 13.4 oz (380 g) dough balls.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2014, 01:08:19 PM by Aimless Ryan »

Offline drewsky6

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Re: Need Dough Recipe for an Event
« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2014, 04:57:57 PM »
Aimless Ryan, I'd like to go with 14" pies. The problem is that lots of people are coming to the event as singles or couples, so I don't want something whose size (and therefore price) is bigger than what they want. Also, I don't think I will have anything but large paper plates on which to serve the pizzas, so I don't want much overhang.

Pete-zza, thanks for the recommendation about the thickness/density loading factor. I am going to play with thicknesses of .7 through .85 and see what I like best with this dough. I was reading a couple threads about NY style and there seems to be something of a range there.

Last night I made some dough - not exactly the recipe Tom gave, but experimenting with oil and lower hydration in the Lahey No-Knead recipe. It was 1 kilo AP flour (to which I added about 30 grams of gluten - I didn't have any bread flour in the house), 32 grams of salt, 3 grams of IDY, 20 grams of olive oil and 600 grams of water. I just mixed the dry with a wisk and then added all the liquid. It rose for about 18 hours on the counter, then it was balled and rose for another 45 minutes to an hour. Bottom line - it was a HUGE improvement over the regular Lahey recipe. Opened nicely. Not too sticky. Could be stretched thin, but it didn't snap back (good extensibility). Good (though not great) oven spring. Browned nicely - leopard spotting on the cornicione, and spots of char on the undercarriage. I will try Tom's recipe later this week.

Andy


 

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