Author Topic: A little experiment with an Emergency crust  (Read 4920 times)

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Offline Essen1

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A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« on: March 28, 2013, 05:19:42 PM »
Did a little experiment yesterday in which I wanted to see if I can produce a good usable crust in the shortest amount of time. The outcome is below. Total time from mixing to out of the oven was 3.5 hrs.

Crust was actually very good but lacked the obvious deeper notes of flavor that a longer fermentation produces. I also used a blend of KABF & AP in a 70/30 ratio to keep the crust somewhat on the softer side.

Was I bored? Yes.  ;D

« Last Edit: March 28, 2013, 05:40:22 PM by Essen1 »
Mike

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Online Chicago Bob

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2013, 05:29:56 PM »
Looks great Mike...what was the bake set-up? Screen?

Bob
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Offline Essen1

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2013, 05:39:23 PM »
Bob,

No screen. I have my kiln shelf/stone always on the lowest rack and Temp was around 610F. The baking time was 8 mins.

Turned out pretty well for such a short time frame.
Mike

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http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline mkevenson

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2013, 06:00:18 PM »
OK, Mike, givie it up :-X . Your pie looks great, and you say it taste good and the texture was good. So what are the particulars, ie recipe, methods etc? We are all dying >:D  to know.
 
Mark
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Offline Essen1

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2013, 06:17:14 PM »
OK, Mike, givie it up :-X . Your pie looks great, and you say it taste good and the texture was good. So what are the particulars, ie recipe, methods etc? We are all dying >:D  to know.
 
Mark

Mark,

Nice to see another Northern Cali fellow on here.  :)

I'll post the numbers later because I don't have then with me here at work. But it was pretty straight forward procedure.
Mike

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Offline mkevenson

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2013, 06:40:16 PM »
Mark,

Nice to see another Northern Cali fellow on here.  :)

I'll post the numbers later because I don't have then with me here at work. But it was pretty straight forward procedure.

Your name looks familiar. We should get together the other members in the area for a PIZZA fest!

Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles

Offline Essen1

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2013, 11:47:52 PM »
Mark,

My name might look familiar. I've been on this forum for about 5 years now I believe.

Anyway, your idea sounds good. I don't know how many active BA members are still on here but it might be a fun thing to do.

Alright, here are the numbers from yesterday...that makes one dough ball.

Flour (100%):
Water (60%):
ADY (1%):
Salt (2%):
Oil (3.7%):
Sugar (4%):
Total (170.7%):
355.01 g  |  12.52 oz | 0.78 lbs
213.01 g  |  7.51 oz | 0.47 lbs
3.55 g | 0.13 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.94 tsp | 0.31 tbsp
7.1 g | 0.25 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.48 tsp | 0.49 tbsp
13.14 g | 0.46 oz | 0.03 lbs | 2.92 tsp | 0.97 tbsp
14.2 g | 0.5 oz | 0.03 lbs | 3.56 tsp | 1.19 tbsp
606 g | 21.38 oz | 1.34 lbs | TF = N/A

Before anything, turn on your oven light if you have one to bring the internal temp to about 70, maybe 80 degrees.

Activate the yeast in parts of the sugar and water. Once it's fully active, add the oil, the rest of the sugar and water. Then the flour.

I used a 70/30 blend of KABF & AP flours, whisked both together in a separate bowl and then sifted it on top of the bubbling yeast-water mix. Add the salt and mix everything with the dough hook on Speed 1 until no dry flour's visible. Rest for 10 mins. Then knead for 6 mins on Speed 2, pour on the counter and let rest for 30 mins covered with a damp kitchen towel.

Shape into a large ball, place into a lightly oiled bowl and place in oven for about 1 hour or until it doubled. Shouldn't be more than an hour, though. Take out, punch down and divide. Shape into a ball, flour a spot on the kitchen counter, place ball on it and cover the ball with said damp kitchen towel until ready to use, approx. 2hrs depending on your ambient temp. Just keep an eye on it.

Preheat oven to its highest temp in the meantime. The ball will expand and double in size...that's when it's ready.

That's all there is to it. Great crust.

P.S.: Bake time was 8 mins and I turned it once half way through.
Mike

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http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Online Pete-zza

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2013, 10:03:41 AM »
Mike,

It can be difficult to make a really good emergency pizza but it looks like you were able to achieve that objective.

Can you tell us what size the pizza was?

Peter

Offline mkevenson

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2013, 10:48:02 AM »
Thanks, Mike, for the details. Since the. age of the member started showing up, I sometimes confuse it with the # of posts a member has. I will try to be more observant in the future.


Mark
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Offline Essen1

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2013, 11:33:07 AM »
Mike,

It can be difficult to make a really good emergency pizza but it looks like you were able to achieve that objective.

Can you tell us what size the pizza was?

Peter

Peter,

Yes, the crust turned out pretty good, actually. More than I have hoped for in such a short time.

The size was 17". My stone doesn't hold a bigger size although I've done 18-inch ones with some of the outer rim slightly hanging over the edge of the stone.
Mike

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http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/


Offline Essen1

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2013, 11:34:18 AM »
Thanks, Mike, for the details. Since the. age of the member started showing up, I sometimes confuse it with the # of posts a member has. I will try to be more observant in the future.


Mark

Mark,

You're welcome and no worries.  They're both just numbers :)
Mike

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http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Essen1

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #11 on: March 29, 2013, 01:03:17 PM »
I forgot to mention to turn the oven light on during the mixing/kneading process so that the inside can reach a temp of about 70-75F. Then place the bowl on the middle rack close to the light and let it rise for an hour.

Sorry if I confused anyone  :-[
Mike

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #12 on: March 31, 2013, 08:17:39 AM »
Mike,

With your 17" pizza size, and a dough ball weight of 21.38 ounces, the corresponding thickness factor is 0.0942. Looking at your dough formulation in view of that thickness factor, I would characterize your pizza as a hybrid, or cross, between an American style pizza (because of the sugar and oil contents) and a NY style (because of the thickness factor). In fact, your dough formulation reminded me of the American/NY hybrid dough formulation posted at Reply 8 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1707.msg15953.html#msg15953 but with a quantity of yeast to become an emergency dough and a softer flour blend (more on this below). Your version should serve as a good addition to the class of American/NY hybrid pizzas.

I also used the Mixed Mass Conversion Calculator at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/ to calculate the protein content of your flour blend with 70% King Arthur bread flour (KABF) and King Arthur all-purpose flour (KAAP). It is 12.4%. That is a value that is common for the NY style.

Since our members are always on the lookout for emergency dough formulations, this morning I added yours to the collection of emergency dough formulations at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8297.msg71576.html#msg71576. It is under the General category.

Peter

Offline Essen1

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #13 on: April 02, 2013, 11:29:37 PM »
Mike,

With your 17" pizza size, and a dough ball weight of 21.38 ounces, the corresponding thickness factor is 0.0942. Looking at your dough formulation in view of that thickness factor, I would characterize your pizza as a hybrid, or cross, between an American style pizza (because of the sugar and oil contents) and a NY style (because of the thickness factor). In fact, your dough formulation reminded me of the American/NY hybrid dough formulation posted at Reply 8 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1707.msg15953.html#msg15953 but with a quantity of yeast to become an emergency dough and a softer flour blend (more on this below). Your version should serve as a good addition to the class of American/NY hybrid pizzas.

I also used the Mixed Mass Conversion Calculator at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/ to calculate the protein content of your flour blend with 70% King Arthur bread flour (KABF) and King Arthur all-purpose flour (KAAP). It is 12.4%. That is a value that is common for the NY style.

Since our members are always on the lookout for emergency dough formulations, this morning I added yours to the collection of emergency dough formulations at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8297.msg71576.html#msg71576. It is under the General category.

Peter


Peter,

Thanks for the honors  ;D

I guess you can label it a crisscross/hybrid of NYC and American style pizzas. And I didn't even bother to figure out the numbers and what not, but I'm glad you did in regards to the protein content and TF.

Nevertheless, I'm glad I made the list. I hope that other members will see this formula as a nice addition whenever an emergency dough is needed. Worked very well for me and the outcome was nothing short but stellar for such a short-time dough.

Mike

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Online Chicago Bob

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #14 on: April 02, 2013, 11:51:23 PM »
Congrats Mike. Nice work and thanks for the contribution.

Bob
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Offline pythonic

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #15 on: April 04, 2013, 10:24:32 AM »
Nice work.  Do u position your stone on the bottom of your oven?  8 min bake time seems like awhile?  Was it moist or drier?

Nate
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Offline pythonic

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #16 on: April 04, 2013, 08:30:36 PM »
Mike,

I tried this recipe for dinner tonight and it turned out really well.  It definitely has a better flavor then other same day doughs I have tried.  Mine were only 5 minute bakes in case you are wondering.

Nate
« Last Edit: April 04, 2013, 08:32:51 PM by pythonic »
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Offline fazzari

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #17 on: April 04, 2013, 10:50:16 PM »

Crust was actually very good but lacked the obvious deeper notes of flavor that a longer fermentation produces. I also used a blend of KABF & AP in a 70/30 ratio to keep the crust somewhat on the softer side.

Mike
Pizza looks excellent!!!!!!  Yesterday, I tried a baguette recipe where a ripe sour dough culture made up about 34% of the total weight of the dough.  Delicious bread was made in about 4 hours.  I'd bet you anything, the same could be done with your emergency dough to add those deeper flavors!!!

John

Offline Essen1

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #18 on: April 05, 2013, 11:20:40 AM »
Nice work.  Do u position your stone on the bottom of your oven?  8 min bake time seems like awhile?  Was it moist or drier?

Nate

Nate,

Sorry for the delay in getting back to you...

Yes, the stone never leaves the bottom rack, even when I use the broiler on occasion. The crust should come out, even after 8 mins in the oven, a tad moist and soft on the inside.

Quote
Mike,

I tried this recipe for dinner tonight and it turned out really well.  It definitely has a better flavor then other same day doughs I have tried.  Mine were only 5 minute bakes in case you are wondering.

Nate

Nate,

That pie looks great! Thanks for giving this recipe a try and I'm glad the outcome was pleasant, which is not always the case when it comes to same-day/emergency doughs, imho  ;D

If you use the formula again at some point, get your stone as hot as possible and try an 8-minute bake or perhaps 7 minutes. makes a big difference.
Mike

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Offline Essen1

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Re: A little experiment with an Emergency crust
« Reply #19 on: April 05, 2013, 11:23:13 AM »
Mike
Pizza looks excellent!!!!!!  Yesterday, I tried a baguette recipe where a ripe sour dough culture made up about 34% of the total weight of the dough.  Delicious bread was made in about 4 hours.  I'd bet you anything, the same could be done with your emergency dough to add those deeper flavors!!!

John

John,

I like that idea. Give it a shot and see what happens. I don't have any SD cultures around, not even a common starter, but I think it's definitely worth trying out.
Mike

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http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/


 

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