Author Topic: Deni 2300  (Read 6093 times)

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Offline charbo

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Deni 2300
« on: January 23, 2006, 03:57:56 PM »
Has anyone checked out the Deni 2300 pizza oven?

cb


Offline Perk

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Re: Deni 2300
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2006, 10:27:29 AM »
looks like the replacement model to the pizza bella.
I have found no reviews on it, looks like it is sold through target but
I am not sure if you can buy it in the store or just on line.
I've read bad reviews about targets web store.


-Dave
Jacksonville Fl.

Offline Perk

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Re: Deni 2300
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2006, 02:19:13 PM »
Looking through the Target Toaster Ovens I saw another oven that is geard for pizza too.
It only has a range of 450F

Pizza Toaster Oven - EP278P
-Dave
Jacksonville Fl.

Offline Perk

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Re: Deni 2300
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2006, 09:03:34 AM »
Well I ordered one of these today.
So I will see how it works.
I mainly bought it for work to cook things with.
-Dave
Jacksonville Fl.

Offline Perk

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Re: Deni 2300
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2006, 11:12:13 PM »
Well the Deni 2300 arrived today and it was pizza day,
so did I break the little varmint out?

Nope, used my stone in the oven! :P

Well I only made one pizza for dinner,
and it is snack time, so I thought,  lets break out the pizza gizmo.
The Deni has two controls, 1 big knob is the timer
and you have a smaller knob for your burners.
You can choose between the top burner, bottom burner or both.
I believe this is a major upgrade
to the pizza Bella. Even though I never had or used a Bella.

It also has a window so you can see the pizza turning and cooking.
This window however fogs up because of the steam it generates cooking your pizza.

I cook a NY style dough, and with my dough recipe, it takes  1/8th of it to make a small pizza for this.
it also rotates the pizza so the pizza is cooked evenly.
One word of caution use a mitt to open up the lid, Hot steam pours out and it can burn you!!
Oh and every time you open the lid and close it the machine will reverse it's rotation.

Instructions said to lightly coat the pizza disk with vegetable oil,
I use peanut oil, do to it has  the higher flash point.

The pizza came out pretty good so I give the Deni 2300 a good grade,
Simple to use, quick to make a pizza in about 10 min.

And great to take to work and make a small pizza for Lunch!


You can see in the picture below the pizza is a size of a regular dinner plate.







« Last Edit: February 12, 2006, 10:09:36 AM by Perk »
-Dave
Jacksonville Fl.

Offline charbo

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Re: Deni 2300
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2006, 04:10:24 PM »
Thanks for sharing your experience with the Deni.  I've thought of buying one for summer use, to avoid heating the kitchen.  My local Target doesn't stock the item, and there's not much info on the web.  Too bad the oven doesn't make a larger pie.  My main concern is the longevity of the heating elements and controls.

cb

Offline Perk

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Re: Deni 2300
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2006, 06:01:15 PM »
It looks pretty well made but really simple in parts.
I'll be taking it to work and making a few pizza's for me and my buddies.
So I will be able to tell.

I bought it from this place on ebay.
They fed ex'd it, arrived super fast brand new.
Deni Pizza Maker on Ebay
-Dave
Jacksonville Fl.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Deni 2300
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2006, 07:55:58 PM »
Because of the unrelenting heat we have been having in Texas recently, I decided to buy a Deni 2300 unit to experiment with. The Deni 2300 replaces the former Bella units that I believe used pizza stones. The new unit (see the first photo) uses a pizza plate (see the second photo) in lieu of a stone. As previously noted in an earlier post, the unit has upper and lower heating coils and controls that allow use of either or both of the coils, for up to a maximum of 30 minutes.

For my first pizza using the Deni 2300 I decided to use a Lehmann NY style dough as formulated for 11 inches, the maximum recommended pizza size. I made the dough in the usual fashion but using a food processor (because of the small volume of dough) and a roughly 26-hour cold fermentation. The dough was allowed to warm up at room temperature for about 45 minutes before shaping it into an 11-inch skin. The skin was placed on the pizza plate, on which I had brushed some oil (as recommended), and dressed with a standard sauce, a blend of shredded cheeses (mainly processed mozzarella and Provolone), raw sliced green peppers, raw sliced onions, and pepperoni slices. I intentionally used several cheeses and toppings in order to see how the unit would perform on a worse case basis.

Since this was my first pizza using the unit, I elected to use both the upper and lower coils for about 6 minutes, and then 5 minutes for the lower coil, 4 minutes for the top coil, and finally another 3 minutes for the bottom coil. The unit has a window through which the top of the pizza can be viewed during baking (although it can fog up if there are a lot of wet toppings). Also, the pizza plate rotates as the pizza bakes. If the top cover is lifted, the rotation stops. I discovered that the unit can hold a lot of heat, so one should be very careful in lifting the cover so as not to be blasted by the very hot escaping heat. I advise using a large pot holder to lift the cover, and stand back a little. There is a small vent in the top cover to allow steam to escape but the volume of steam escaping via the vent is quite small.

The remaining photos show the finished pizza. The pizza was quite tasty but no match for one baked in the standard home oven. The crust was chewy but without a rim to speak of, and with little oven spring. The outer part of the pizza was a bit crispy. There was crust color but not of the order of magnitude of a typical Lehmann crust as baked in a home oven. Also, the bottom crust was not of a uniform color, being greater in the ribbed parts of the pizza plate.

I plan from time to time to experiment with ways of getting more of an oven spring using the Deni unit. I know this is not all that easy when starting out with a cold pizza plate. Also, I suspect the temperature of the unit is not comparable to a home oven. To compensate, I plan to use a lot more yeast, proof the skin on the plate (within the unit, when off), and possibly pre-bake the crust before dressing and finishing baking. Whether the results will be good enough remains to be seen, but the unit does have value in substituting for a home oven in the middle of summer. The pizza did taste good. It just lacked depth of character. At least thus far.

I think the unit may also hold some promise for making pizzas with eggs and using 00 flour, in which case it should be possible to put raw eggs on the dough before baking (or after pre-baking) and control the bake of the eggs using the top heating coil.

Peter
« Last Edit: January 02, 2007, 09:43:37 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Deni 2300
« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2006, 08:49:39 AM »
The photos below show my most recent Lehmann 11-inch pizza as made in my new Deni 2300 counter pizza oven. The dough for this pizza incorporated all the changes I indicated in Reply 7 of this thread that I would incorporate in the most recent pizza in an effort to improve upon the results I achieved with the pizza described and shown in that post. The changes this time included: 1) increasing the amount of IDY (to 0.375%, by weight of flour) to the upper end of the range recommended by Tom Lehmann for IDY; 2) using an autolyse (this was a last minute addition); 3) docking and proofing the shaped skin; and 4) pre-baking the skin before dressing and finishing baking the pizza.

As before, I made the dough in my food processor. The sequencing was as follows: combine the flour (KASL) and IDY; add the water (cold right out of the refrigerator) and pulse until a dough ball forms; autolyse for 5 minutes; add the salt and oil and pulse to combine; hand knead the finished dough for 30 seconds; and brush the dough ball with oil and place in a covered container (in my case, I used an inflated Zip-type storage bag).

The dough was placed on my kitchen counter and allowed to ferment at room temperature for 6 hours, at which time the dough was punched down and allowed to ferment/ripen for an additional 2 hours. Then the dough was shaped and stretched out to an 11-inch skin, brushed with a bit of olive oil, docked, put on the pizza plate, and placed in the Deni unit while it was in its “off” state. To prevent sticking and to produce a good bottom crust color, the pizza plate had been liberally oiled with a light olive oil (Classico) before the skin was put on it. The skin was allowed to proof (rise) in the Deni unit, with the cover closed, for 40 minutes.

After the dough finished proofing, I pre-baked it using both the top and bottom heating coils for about 4 minutes, or until I could see through the viewing window that it was very lightly browned. I then removed the pizza plate with the pre-baked skin on it and sauced and cheesed the skin and put on several toppings. The toppings were essentially the same as those used the last time except that the pepperoni (Margherita brand) was diced instead of in slices, and I also added some roasted red peppers (bottled).

The pizza was then baked for 9 minutes, using both the top and bottom heating coils, followed by a final 2-3 minutes of top baking using only the top heating coil.

The changes implemented this time resulted in a significantly improved pizza. The pizza had a distinct rim and modest crumb although, as expected, it was not as pronounced as might be achieved in a standard home oven, which can produce a much better oven spring than the Deni unit can deliver. The crust coloration, both top and bottom, was also much improved, and the crust was chewy and a bit crispy. Overall, the pizza tasted very good, better than I originally expected I would be able to achieve using the unit. Also, the pizza was made completely during the course of the day, without requiring an overnight fermentation (although it is certainly possible to do so) and without requiring refrigeration (cold fermentation). Best of all, I didn’t use my regular oven at all.

In a future effort, I would like to try a cold fermented Lehmann dough again even though I was very pleased with the dough I used this time. I think I may also try using some dried dairy whey to get even more color in the crust. Otherwise, I expect the basic procedures to be pretty much the same as I used this time.

To be sure, the Deni unit has its limitations. The maximum pizza size is 11-inches and the long individual bake time (15-16 minutes for the recent pizza) can make it difficult to bake several pizzas in succession. Alas, those are some of the tradeoffs.

Peter
« Last Edit: January 02, 2007, 09:44:40 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline lilbuddypizza

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Re: Deni 2300
« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2006, 01:14:13 PM »
My experience from using ANY Deni products is that they are very poorly made.Also, in reading reviews for other Deni Products, I have found few to contradict this opinion.


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Deni 2300
« Reply #10 on: August 12, 2006, 11:12:04 PM »
The photo below shows my latest Deni 2300 effort. The dough was made in essentially the same way as the previous one except that I used a longer autolyse period (20 minutes) and I added 4% dried dairy whey, by weight of flour. I also used a longer cold fermentation, about 65 hours. The shaped out skin was docked, proofed, pre-baked and dressed in the same manner as the last one except that I added some uncooked mushroom slices in addition to the onions, green peppers, roasted red peppers, and diced pepperoni. 

What I was hoping for was a better oven spring and better crust color development. I did not get the oven spring I was hoping for, but to be fair I did put a lot of stuff on the pizza given its modest 11" size. That said, I couldn't complain about the taste of the pizza. The crust was chewy more than crispy, but with all the high quality ingredients I used, the pizza tasted very good and it wasn't swampy with all the uncooked vegetables. I still plan to investigate ways of getting a better oven spring, but I realize that the opportunities are limited because of the inherent limitations of the unit.

As a footnote, I will mention that I echo lilbuddypizza's comments regarding the design of the Deni unit. It's housing can get very hot and one has to be careful when lifting up the cover. The unit should be kept out of the reach of small children. But even adults have to be careful, at least until getting to know the unit better.

Peter
« Last Edit: August 28, 2006, 01:19:27 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Deni 2300
« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2006, 03:52:00 PM »
In Reply 7 of this thread, I indicated that I was going to use the Deni 2300 unit to make a pizza with eggs, using 00 flour to make the dough. I did this today, and reported the results, including the dough formulation I used, at the Pizza and Egg thread at Reply 47 at  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,637.msg29667.html#msg29667. Two eggs were used, along with a shredded blend of mozzarella and provolone cheeses and Portuguese chourico and pepperoni slices. The photo below shows the finished pizza, which turned out exceptionally well and suggests that the Deni 2300 unit has merit for 00 pizzas.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Deni 2300
« Reply #12 on: August 27, 2006, 03:49:21 PM »
Today, I entered a post, at Reply 48 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,637.msg30071.html#msg30071, in which I described and showed my latest brunch/breakfast pizza-with-egg baked in the Deni 2300 unit.

One of the interesting things I discovered recently about the Deni 2300 unit is that it will operate even with nothing in it--with either the top or bottom heating element being on, or both, and whether the pizza plate is in the unit or not. This suggested the possibility of preheating the unit to create a better environment for achieving a better oven spring than I have been able to get before when using the unit. With my latest pizza, I decided to preheat the Deni unit without the pizza plate in it. I found it easier to prepare the pizza skin (9") and place it on the pizza plate when cold rather than hot. Since I have gained experience placing skins on the pizza plate, which is easy to do with a 9" pizza, I suspect next time I will preheat the pizza plate also and maybe use a peel to load the skin (docked and oilled on the top) directly onto the preheated pizza plate. This may mean not pre-oiling the pizza plate, as I have done in the past, or possibly quickly oiling the preheated pizza plate just before I slide the skin onto it.

I have found the Deni 2300 to be easy to operate and control to get the desired results, which has gotten easier as I have gained experience with the unit. Thus far, I have found that the skins made with 00 flour perform better than other flours. However, since I haven't applied some of the new tricks I have learned with the other flours, I may discover later that the unit can be made to work reasonably well with doughs made with the other flours also.

The sequence that seems to work the best based on my experience thus far with the Deni unit is shaping and docking the skin, oiling it, placing it on the pizza plate (pre-oiled), pre-baking the skin top and bottom until just light brown, and cheesing and topping the unit and finishing the baking. The cover can be lifted and lowered pretty much at will to allow one to do whatever is necessary on the pizza as it bakes. And, since the pizza is in full view while it is being baked, either when the cover is up or viewing the pizza through the window, it is easy to make adjustments to the pizza.

The photo below shows the latest pizza--with scrambled eggs and andouille sausage and pepperoni slices. I enjoyed the pizza very much, so much so that I suspect that I will be using only the Deni unit to make the breakfast/brunch type of pizza-with-egg in the future. My original purpose for buying the Deni unit, apart from just experimenting with it, was to use it in lieu of my home oven in the summertime. For the 00 brunch/breakfast doughs, I suspect I will be using the unit year-round.

Peter
« Last Edit: August 27, 2006, 03:57:33 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline lilbuddypizza

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Re: Deni 2300
« Reply #13 on: August 28, 2006, 01:08:28 PM »
You're killing me! ;D
Now, I can have pizza for breakfast ,lunch, and dinner!!
Pies look great.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Deni 2300
« Reply #14 on: August 28, 2006, 01:42:46 PM »
lilbuddypizza,

Thanks. As usual, the devil is in the detail.

I have made and described several egg-based pizzas at the Pizza with an Egg thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,637.msg5794.html#msg5794, but I have concluded from my recent experiments that the Deni 2300 unit is actually more convenient to use than my standard home oven to make pizzas based on using 00 flour. And the quality and taste of the pizzas is very good, and very comparable to what I can make in my regular home oven. So, using two "toys", my proofing box and the Deni 2300 unit, I can have a good pizza on my plate within one hour, from start to finish. Thus far, my home oven is still the better choice for flours other than the 00 flours.

Peter

Offline Bryan S

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Re: Deni 2300
« Reply #15 on: September 10, 2007, 11:35:02 PM »
Peter, As always you are the man. My 2300 arrived today and I really appreciate this link you provided me. I'm really looking forward to getting to know my 2300. Now if I could only find Caputo 00 flour in Amish Town PA. ::)  Well there's always Penn-Mac and I could use some more Ezzo. OBTW that breakfast egg pizza is over the top Bud.  :o 8) ;D
Making great pizza and learning new things everyday.


 

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