Author Topic: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata  (Read 1462 times)

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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #80 on: May 19, 2013, 10:55:37 PM »
  Oh yeah, thats right. I've stood on German train platforms an seen fights break out between rival fans all dressed in team garb and carrying their flags....those boys take that stuff reeeel serious!  ;D

Exactly - and here it's not just the fellas that are fanatics. Women and children, too! Madness I say  :-D
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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #81 on: May 19, 2013, 11:00:43 PM »
Exactly - and here it's not just the fellas that are fanatics. Women and children, too! Madness I say :-D
No; that comment goes to American WW...whatever wrestling!   ::)
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #82 on: May 20, 2013, 06:45:21 AM »
No; that comment goes to American WW...whatever wrestling!   ::)

 :-D
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #83 on: May 20, 2013, 06:52:18 AM »
For breakfast this morning I had a couple slices of yesterday's bread topped with sausage & egg scramble, with queijo prato (similar to danish danbo cheese), hot peppers and tomatoes.
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro rimacinata
« Reply #84 on: August 27, 2013, 09:16:04 PM »
Yet another brand of semola rimacinata to try out.  Imported from Italy - La Molisana. The bottom packaging states "Perfect for pasta, bread and pizza." I do remember using this flour for some pizzarium style pies and was very satisfied with the results.

To mix things up a bit, I'll be using a 100% hydrated poolish this time around, in the hopes of achieving a more open crumb, as well as capturing as much flavor as possible from this wonderful flour.  The poolish was made this evening (500gms water, 500 gms semolina flour, 2 grams CY), and I plan to make bread with it after 48hours. I'm very curious to see how it turns out.
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #85 on: August 29, 2013, 10:18:26 PM »
Continuing from my last post:

It's now been 48 hours since I made the poolish.  I did the math for an 80% hydration dough, then added what remaining water and semolina flour was needed in order to achieve that percentage.  The poolish, after 48h showed very little signs of life -just a few bubbles on the surface. Before mixing in the remaining ingredients (water, semolina flour & salt), I let the poolish sit on the counter for approx 1hour.  It started to come alive, showing signs of fermentation (small bubbles forming all around the bottom and sides of the dough, visible through the glass bowl.  Ingredients mixed, followed by a few rigeneri sessions, then back to the fridge for some more slow and cold fermentation.  Looks like I'll be able to bake bread tomorrow evening, or Saturday morning.

Summary so far: 48 hours poolish cold fermentation followed by 1 hour counter, followed by
 Next step:          24 - 36 hours cold fermentation of the doughball, a 1 1/2 hour counter rise and bake


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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #86 on: August 31, 2013, 12:07:40 PM »
I was able to bake the first boule this afternoon.

48 hour refridgerated poolish, followed by 36 hours fermentation in the fridge + 4 hours counter rise and bake. I observed that this particular brand "La Mosina" didn't handle the 80% hydration as well as the previous brands, and required more stretch and folds to get into shape.

Scoring didn't go so well, as such this was a Van Gough boule (earless). Crumb wasn't as open as I'd have liked.  Bummer. What I did like was the crackling crust, crust coloration, and dough flavor. Pics:

 
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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #87 on: August 31, 2013, 04:17:02 PM »
I was able to bake the first boule this afternoon.

48 hour refridgerated poolish, followed by 36 hours fermentation in the fridge + 4 hours counter rise and bake. I observed that this particular brand "La Mosina" didn't handle the 80% hydration as well as the previous brands, and required more stretch and folds to get into shape.

Scoring didn't go so well, as such this was a Van Gough boule (earless). Crumb wasn't as open as I'd have liked.  Bummer. What I did like was the crackling crust, crust coloration, and dough flavor. Pics:
Man that looks killer and you have done that bread proud Mr. Johnny. Please tell me you would consider using that for Sunday morning French Toast.  :drool:
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #88 on: September 01, 2013, 04:33:26 PM »
Man that looks killer and you have done that bread proud Mr. Johnny. Please tell me you would consider using that for Sunday morning French Toast.  :drool:

Thanks Chicago Bob! I got a good laugh imagining some slices of that bread being used for french toast!  :-D
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Offline JimmyG

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #89 on: September 03, 2013, 12:42:21 AM »
Beautiful color and hole structure. Do you know what your target temp is for your baked loaf? I know myself I typically aim between 93C - 98C (200F - 208F) with semolina doughs.
Jim
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Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #90 on: September 03, 2013, 06:04:02 PM »
Do you know what your target temp is for your baked loaf? I know myself I typically aim between 93C - 98C (200F - 208F) with semolina doughs.
Jim

 I've never used internal temp as an indicator for "doneness" rather relying on other external clues for that.  IMO, it's pretty hard to undercook a rustic yeast bread, even a highly hydrated one (or sourdough for that matter).
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Online mbrulato

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #91 on: September 03, 2013, 07:30:16 PM »
Ok, so you've all got my mouth watering for this semolina bread.  I found Caputo brand here http://www.pastacheese.com/grains-legumes/bread-crumbs-flour/antico-molino-caputo-semola-di-grano-duro-rimacinata-semolina-flour-2-2-lbs.html. I've never attempted this bread before but plan on it this weekend.  I have a few questions for you:

I don't have cake yeast, would the .5% still be used if I were using IDY?
I don't have a covered baker, so I would use my pizza stone with a pan of water at 550 degrees convection.  How long should I bake a boule at?

Thanks,
Mary Ann
Mary Ann

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #92 on: September 03, 2013, 08:04:08 PM »
Ok, so you've all got my mouth watering for this semolina bread.  I found Caputo brand here http://www.pastacheese.com/grains-legumes/bread-crumbs-flour/antico-molino-caputo-semola-di-grano-duro-rimacinata-semolina-flour-2-2-lbs.html. I've never attempted this bread before but plan on it this weekend.  I have a few questions for you:

I don't have cake yeast, would the .5% still be used if I were using IDY?
I don't have a covered baker, so I would use my pizza stone with a pan of water at 550 degrees convection.  How long should I bake a boule at?

Thanks,
Mary Ann


Mary Ann,

Keep in mind that the conversion from idy to cy is about 3:1. 

No covered baker - no problem, you can do the pan of water (boiling water) method or simply use an all steel or aluminum pot to cover the boule on the stone. Bake covered on the preheated stone at high temp (500-525 farenheit) for 20 minutes, but after the first 15 minutes decrease temp to 450-475 (I'm used to celsius, so these temps are rough estimates), then bake for an additional 15-20 uncovered. I like to bake strong until the crust is a nice, dark color, that's just my preference.

This dough can easily remain refridgerated for up to 5 days (the longest I've pushed it); and will develop more flavor with each passing day.  It will smell like a light fruity pilsen beer, too :)

Please let us know how it turns out - and don't hesitate to ask any questions should you have any, ok!
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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #93 on: September 03, 2013, 08:08:09 PM »
Thanks, Johnny.  I'm going to order the flour now - perhaps a few bags extra because I will also use it to make my homemade pasta.  I will post pictures if it turns out okay.  Looking forward to it!  :drool:
Mary Ann

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #94 on: September 05, 2013, 11:29:11 AM »
The flour is supposed to come today! I've already calculated recipe based upon your %.  I'm going to do a 48 hour poolish and then refrigerate dough for 24 hours and bake on Sunday (after bringing to RT) to go with my homemade pasta and meatballs  :drool:
Mary Ann

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #95 on: September 05, 2013, 11:26:59 PM »
Sounds like a good plan to me, Mary Ann  ;)

Happy stretchin' and foldin, and snap a pic or two of the dough as it's coming along!

J
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Offline vmangiacapra

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro rimacinata
« Reply #96 on: September 06, 2013, 09:20:57 AM »
do you know were in the USA the semola is available
Vin

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #97 on: September 06, 2013, 09:30:16 AM »
Vin,

See the above link I posted.  You can find them through Amazon if you don't want to create another login for pasta cheese.com.  I use them bc they are located very close to me, unfortunately the shipping was more than the item.  But I did get it in 2 days :). Check your local Italian deli or specialty food market.  There are other brands besides Caputo mentioned in this thread. Check it out  :)

Mary Ann
Mary Ann

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #98 on: September 07, 2013, 09:11:41 AM »
Mary Ann,

Keep in mind that the conversion from idy to cy is about 3:1. 

No covered baker - no problem, you can do the pan of water (boiling water) method or simply use an all steel or aluminum pot to cover the boule on the stone. Bake covered on the preheated stone at high temp (500-525 farenheit) for 20 minutes, but after the first 15 minutes decrease temp to 450-475 (I'm used to celsius, so these temps are rough estimates), then bake for an additional 15-20 uncovered. I like to bake strong until the crust is a nice, dark color, that's just my preference.

This dough can easily remain refridgerated for up to 5 days (the longest I've pushed it); and will develop more flavor with each passing day.  It will smell like a light fruity pilsen beer, too :)

Please let us know how it turns out - and don't hesitate to ask any questions should you have any, ok!

Johnny,

I do have a deep dish stoneware pie plate.  Do you think this would work to let dough proof after taken out of the fridge and to bake it in?  I'm just concerned that, because of the hydration level, the dough will not stay in a ball on the parchment and I would like to score it before it goes in the oven.  Any thoughts???

Mary Ann
Mary Ann

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Pane di semola di grano duro remacinata
« Reply #99 on: September 07, 2013, 09:37:52 AM »
Mary Ann, if I understand correctly, you intend to use the stoneware pie plate to allow the dough to proof (after final shaping), and then to bake the dough in. Also, you intend to use parchment paper.

My thoughts: if using a cold, room temp pie plate, you won't get the same open crumb - in fact, you may be rather dissapointed with the end result, considering that it would take several precious minutes for the stoneware pie plate to heat up, and during this time a crust will be forming, impeding dough expanion. Ideally, you'd want to place the dough directly on a hot pizza stone, slash, then cover with a tall all stainless steel or aluminum pot (which has been preheated also).

If you want to score the dough before going into the oven, that should't be a problem at all, just make sure and score it immediately prior.

Regarding the use of parchment paper, how exactly do you plan on using it? I've never used it. Despite the high hydration, if you do enough stretch and folds, the dough will maintain a ballish shape.

I think if you allow the doughball, after final shaping, to rest, seamside up inside of a lined lined bowl (you could use a cotton dish towel, or something similar - make sure and sprinkle it generously with semolina flour prior to placing the dough), you wouldnt't need parchment paper at all. Once the dough looks suffiicently risen and feels gassy and alive to the tough, simply plop it out onto the preheated pizza stone.
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