Author Topic: Can we discuss "Autolyse" - I don't understand the concept  (Read 11768 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Can we discuss "Autolyse" - I don't understand the concept
« Reply #20 on: March 13, 2006, 10:14:05 AM »
Bill,

Over time, the term "autolyse" has come to be used--often incorrectly from a technical standpoint--to mean essentially any rest period without particular regard to what is in the dough during the rest period. My experience is that a dough will hydrate better during almost any rest period. However, my preference is to add the yeast after the autolyse rest period and follow that with the oil, if any, and the salt. In your case, I don't see any reason why you can't add the yeast up front if the dough is kept cool and the autolyse is under, say, 30 minutes. One way to avoid overheating the dough with the food processor is to use the pulse feature for the bulk of the kneading, with perhaps a 10-15 second knead at full speed at the end, or just until the dough has the right feel and consistency. If your processor has a variable speed feature (mine doesn't), that will give you even better control over the process.

You might also find this thread of interest with regard to using a food processor for kneading dough: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2189.msg19289.html#msg19289.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 13, 2006, 10:17:12 AM by Pete-zza »


Offline Steve

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Re: Can we discuss "Autolyse" - I don't understand the concept
« Reply #21 on: March 13, 2006, 03:01:26 PM »
The flour's improved hydration and gluten development shorten the mixing time, increase extensibilty (the dough rips less during shaping), and ultimately result in bread with a creamier colored crumb and more aroma and sweet wheat flavor.

This is what I first noticed about my NY style pizza using this technique... the dough has so much more flavor!

And I'm not even using a 24-hour cold fermentation!  :chef:

Steve
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Can we discuss "Autolyse" - I don't understand the concept
« Reply #22 on: March 13, 2006, 04:22:12 PM »
I think what is important when using autolyse in a food processor environment is that the dough not be overkneaded, which is easy to do given the speed at which a processor can operate. This can cause oxidation of the carotenoids and reduce the creaminess of color and the aroma. Otherwise, it would be better to put the salt in first since salt slows down the oxidation of the carotenoids, as pointed out in this King Arthur piece: http://www.kingarthurflour.com/professional/salt.html. Using the food processor pulse feature as much as possible should mitigate the oxidation problem.

It's also a good idea to use unbleached flour if possible since bleaching whitens the flour by removing color contributed by the carotenoids.

Peter
« Last Edit: October 07, 2012, 12:36:19 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline billneild

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Re: Can we discuss "Autolyse" - I don't understand the concept
« Reply #23 on: March 14, 2006, 09:16:57 AM »
I think I understand and I think I have been doing the right thing by chance.  Thaks for all the tips!

Bill

Offline cocoabean

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Re: Can we discuss "Autolyse" - I don't understand the concept
« Reply #24 on: March 14, 2006, 01:02:30 PM »
As for the ingredients added before autolyse, it seems yeast is ok, just not the compressed yeast, the whole pH thing.  I assume that extends to things like butter milk at that point.  Oil seems counter productive to add then, since it would reduce the gluten formation, as far as I understand.  Probably wrong.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Can we discuss "Autolyse" - I don't understand the concept
« Reply #25 on: March 14, 2006, 01:25:36 PM »
cocoabean,

My understanding is the same as yours. I suspect that oil was not given much attention in the context of autolyse since the classic French breads (baguettes, ficelles, etc.) don't use oil. In fact, according to Wikipedia, French food laws define bread as a product containing only the following four ingredients: water, flour, yeast, and salt. The addition of any other ingredient to the basic recipe requires the baker to use a different name for the final product. Oil serves to coat and lubricate the gluten strands and, hence, would interfere with the hydration process.

Peter

Offline scpizza

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Re: Can we discuss "Autolyse" - I don't understand the concept
« Reply #26 on: September 24, 2007, 08:33:05 PM »
Professor Calvel was honored for his contributions to breadmaking a few years ago. At the time, he was in his 90's. To the best of my knowledge, he is still alive. At least I couldn't find an obit when I did a Google search.

Ran across this in the October 2005 issue of Modern Baking:

"Professor Raymond Calvel died on August 30. He was an instrumental influence in forming the skills of artisan bakers across the United States, first through Julia Child and later through numerous artisan bakers. He began as an apprentice boulanger in his native France in the 1930s. From 1936 to 1978, he was a professor of baking at The National Superior School of Milling and Cereal Industries (ENSMIC). Mr. Calvel authored several books, and traveled the world as an ambassador of bakery products, always insistent on quality. His contribution of the autolyse process was important in the evolution of creating quality bread."

Offline Bryan S

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Re: Can we discuss "Autolyse" - I don't understand the concept
« Reply #27 on: September 24, 2007, 10:34:51 PM »
Ran across this in the October 2005 issue of Modern Baking:

"Professor Raymond Calvel died on August 30. He was an instrumental influence in forming the skills of artisan bakers across the United States, first through Julia Child and later through numerous artisan bakers. He began as an apprentice boulanger in his native France in the 1930s. From 1936 to 1978, he was a professor of baking at The National Superior School of Milling and Cereal Industries (ENSMIC). Mr. Calvel authored several books, and traveled the world as an ambassador of bakery products, always insistent on quality. His contribution of the autolyse process was important in the evolution of creating quality bread."

Some more info on Raymond. http://www.practicallyedible.com/edible.nsf/encyclopaedia!openframeset&frame=Right&Src=/edible.nsf/pages/raymondcalvel!opendocument
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Offline abatardi

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Re: Can we discuss "Autolyse" - I don't understand the concept
« Reply #28 on: September 25, 2007, 01:00:31 AM »
 :(
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