Author Topic: Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza  (Read 137807 times)

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Offline DKM

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #20 on: June 19, 2003, 03:39:43 PM »
AP Flour?

I'm on too many of these boards


Michelle

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #21 on: June 19, 2003, 04:28:57 PM »
Sorry - Yes, that's AP

Offline YoMomma

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #22 on: July 12, 2003, 11:18:46 AM »
Michelle, re: " I already have a tried and true thin crust recipe" ...
would you please post your recipe on the thin crust thread?

Michelle

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #23 on: July 13, 2003, 08:29:24 PM »
I'm comparing 3 thin crusts tomorrow (side by side) and I will post the best one.

Offline Randy

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #24 on: July 17, 2003, 10:00:38 PM »
Can someone give me a first hand account of an actual slice of Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza.  The picture I saw on Food TV looked like the bottom had an almost a corn bread appearance.  Is it kind of greasy on the bottom?  What about the taste?
Randy

Michelle

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #25 on: July 18, 2003, 07:02:20 AM »
Haven't been there in several years, but I always think of Chicago Style Pizza crust as pastry-like.  It's flaky, buttery, slightly greasy on the palate.  It is NOT a thick, chewy dough.  
« Last Edit: July 18, 2003, 07:05:18 AM by Michelle »

Offline Randy

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #26 on: July 18, 2003, 07:20:00 AM »
Haven't been there in several years, but I always think of Chicago Style Pizza crust as pastry-like.  It's flaky, buttery, slightly greasy on the palate.  It is NOT a thick, chewy dough.  
The flaky part has me buffaloed Michelle.  Others have used the same term.  FoodTV showed several scenes of their pizza on one of their programs and it looked like a typical yeast risen pizza dough.  I saw no layering like pastry.  I think it is my misunderstanding of the use of the word flaky.
Is the outside of a cooked piece of pizza dough crisp to the point it breaks easily?
Is the inside of a cooked piece of pizza dough a typical yeast risen crumb?

Whew, these things can get confusing. :D

Thanks
Randy

Offline DKM

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #27 on: July 18, 2003, 11:50:29 AM »
Although by now it also been years since I have had one in Chicago, I did find it flaky, but not the same way that as a pie crust, but more like a biscuit.

DKM
« Last Edit: July 18, 2003, 05:27:40 PM by DKM »
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Offline Randy

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #28 on: July 18, 2003, 05:10:44 PM »
Would it be correct to say then that the outer crust peels from the inside crumb in a chunk or big flake?

Randy

Offline DKM

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #29 on: July 18, 2003, 05:38:14 PM »
The best description I have ever seen of it was on Food Networks "Follow That Food" when Gordon Elliot is with Marc Malnati.  I might have it  tape I'll see if I can find Elliots quote on it.

DKM
« Last Edit: July 18, 2003, 05:40:18 PM by DKM »
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Offline Randy

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #30 on: July 18, 2003, 06:56:27 PM »
That was the show I was talking about.  I happened to have it on tape also.  The bottom of pizza looks like it is very oily but that may not be correct.  The dough he puts in the pan is either very wet or very oily.  Thanks DKM.
Maybe Steve has eaten there recently.
Randy

Offline DKM

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #31 on: July 18, 2003, 09:13:02 PM »
In the recipes that I have the dough is slightly wet, and then since I coat the dough with oil when I put it in the bowl to rise (raise?) it is slightly oily.

Add in the oil in the bottom of the pan and the crust is kind of greasy.

DKM
« Last Edit: July 18, 2003, 09:16:04 PM by DKM »
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Offline Randy

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #32 on: July 18, 2003, 09:21:38 PM »
Here is the next experimental recipe that I will try next.

Chicago-style Deep Dish Pizza Dough try #3

1 ˝  Teaspoons SAF yeast
2 Teaspoons sugar
1 C. warm water
2 Tablespoon  shortening
1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
3 Tablespoons cornmeal
3 C. flour(Try 13.8 oz.)
1 ˝   Teaspoon salt
24 hr rise in the Frig.
 It will make 2 thick 8” pizza’s. Use olive oil in the pan. 475 for 20 minutes.

Rootsy

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #33 on: July 20, 2003, 05:39:02 PM »
As an avid Lou's fan and foodie I would say their crust is light and airy but not flaky.  As another poster mentioned, flaky to me brings connotations of a pastry with a layered effect.  Lou's dough is substantial enough to hold all of the delicious toppings and not be a heavy mound of dough.  You can actually eat a Lou's deep dish with you hands.  Actually you can eat it with just one hand, that's how firm the crust is.  The bottom of the crust is slightly oily but nothing like say, a Pizza Hut pan pizza.  It is always just at the point of being crispy but not crunchy.  I think their reuse of the deep dish pans (seasoning them like a cast iron skillet) makes a difference that is hard to replicate at home.  My deep dish pan is not seasoned enough to look like a Lou's pan.  I might have to try and buy one of their pans next time I'm in Chicago.

Offline Randy

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #34 on: July 20, 2003, 10:38:21 PM »
That was a great discription.
Thanks
Randy

Fran

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #35 on: July 21, 2003, 10:12:17 AM »
The recipe I have is very close to this one, but before adding ingredients, I coat the bottom of the crust with butter or olive oil. Turns out very good.

Offline Randy

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #36 on: July 21, 2003, 11:30:23 AM »
Fran I think that is a good point.  Michelle I think coated hers.  The last time I made it, I put a bit of olive oil in pan then pushed the dough until it filled the bottom, then flipped it over essentially coating both sides.  The sides were then pressed in place.
Would you post your recipe Fran, or is it a secret.

Randy

Fran

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #37 on: July 21, 2003, 05:06:13 PM »
I usually make thin crust, but when doing a deep dish I use:

Dough:

3 cups flour
1 cup water
1 pkg dry yeast
3 tbs olive oil
1 tbs sugar
1 tsp salt

Sauce (about 3 cups):

6-1 tomatoes
basil and oregano to your taste
garlic powder
salt/pepper
1-2 tbs sugar

Sauce (east version)
1 small can paste
2 small cans tom sauce
1 small can water
add the rest of the spices
heat to mix herbs and flavors

Prepare:

I use a Black Skillet (about 50 years old)
oil or butter the bottom and sides
Press the dough out and up the sides
Prick with fork
oil the top of the dough, or use butter
start with the cheese, then any other ingredients
ladle sauce on top
parmesian if you want on top

500 degrees till done (20-25 minutes)

Works for me, but as I said I like the thin crust and I'm from Chicago, where the pizza of choice is thin not thick. The best pies are from the old Italian guys with street locations. Vito and Nicks, Chesdins, Home Run Inn, Papa's, etc.

Offline DKM

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #38 on: July 21, 2003, 10:01:56 PM »
Hi Fran,

If you don't mind could you post you thin crust recipe under that topic?

DKM
I'm on too many of these boards

Fran

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Re:Lou Malnati's Chicago Style Pizza
« Reply #39 on: July 22, 2003, 11:42:17 AM »
Randy, I simply divide the dough recipe into two balls. I use perforated pans. I butter the pans add cornmeal  and spread the dough out. Add ingredients and bake at 475-500. Turn pan after 6-7 minutes bake for another 6-7 minutes. Just watch it as ovens vary.

Fran


 

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