Author Topic: Water  (Read 312 times)

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Offline crazy al

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Water
« on: Yesterday at 02:35:48 PM »
I was wondering if any one knows how much the water matters ? I have heard that its a major factor in NY, that with out NY water, one cant make NY pizza. any truth to this ?
Thanks.
AL

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Water
« Reply #1 on: Yesterday at 02:41:26 PM »
crazy al,

If you do a forum search, you will find many posts on the subject. However, this article might help answer your question:

http://www.pizzatoday.com/departments/in-the-kitchen/dough-doctor-water-works/

Peter

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Re: Water
« Reply #2 on: Yesterday at 02:52:13 PM »
I have heard that its a major factor in NY, that with out NY water, one cant make NY pizza. any truth to this ?

Be careful, I've heard the NYPD will actually come to your house and arrest you if you claim to make NY pizza with water from a different state.  :(
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Offline crazy al

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Re: Water
« Reply #3 on: Yesterday at 03:11:38 PM »
Thanks for the link to that article . It might seem like a dumb question, or that I am too lazy to search this forum. but I looked and found so much info, its hard to process.

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Re: Water
« Reply #4 on: Yesterday at 04:05:26 PM »
It's not a dumb question - just an urban legend. Unless your water actually tastes really bad, you will be fine.
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Offline theppgcowboy

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Re: Water
« Reply #5 on: Yesterday at 05:49:36 PM »
Unless your water actually tastes really bad, you will be fine.

That pretty much is NY water, How does NY get away with it?

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Water
« Reply #6 on: Yesterday at 06:36:43 PM »
That pretty much is NY water, How does NY get away with it?

I've been there lots of times. It tastes fine.
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Offline parallei

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Re: Water
« Reply #7 on: Yesterday at 07:02:45 PM »
I've been there lots of times. It tastes fine.

I'm partial to Denver water, but then I've been designing potable water treatment plants around here for 30 odd years.  If you want the "official" lowdown, the AWWA has a "contest" most years and one could google it to see the results.  You'd be surprised how seriously many (I won't say most) water providers care about the aesthetic qualities of their water.  Obviously, much has to do with the source water folks have to deal with.  NYC's is pretty high quality.   

Offline nick57

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Re: Water
« Reply #8 on: Yesterday at 09:14:24 PM »
 PBS had a documentary on how NYC gets their water. It is a pristine source. But, they treat their water pretty much like most municipalities. It was interesting to see the complicated process they go through to provide clean drinking water. I have worked in a lot of towns when I was a X- Ray technician. Some equipment require a constant water supply. We filtered the incoming water. It was amazing the differences in the quality from town to town. Some towns, the filters would last 6 months, but others, they would barely last a month. If your water has little or no flavors or off colors, you are probably good. If you want the best water just for pizza, get a Brita filter product. It will last a long time, unless you make a pie every day.  :-D   

Offline apizza

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Re: Water
« Reply #9 on: Yesterday at 09:44:20 PM »
Has anyone here tried distilled water? I really never thought much about using anything but tap water. I wonder if the chlorine has any effect.


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Re: Water
« Reply #10 on: Yesterday at 10:22:37 PM »
Has anyone here tried distilled water? I really never thought much about using anything but tap water. I wonder if the chlorine has any effect.

It's not even a blip on the list of things that matter.
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Offline Jackitup

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Re: Water
« Reply #11 on: Today at 04:07:46 AM »
This has been dscussed at length in the past and I still maintain the same position. Anyone that says that a certain water from anywhere, has the best taste because it is the purest and cleanest if full of it. By definition, pure, clean, pristine water should be defined by it's LACK of taste or flavor, it should be completely, utterly, neutral with no flavor chacerstics nor any chemicals or minerals that would give advantage. Like Craig said, urban myth for sure. Distilled water or RO water probably your best bet. NY just has a great campaign touting their water as some kind of secret miracle tonic for their pizzas. Great gig, it's worked for years, but any good clean water would have done it and probably has

jon


« Last Edit: Today at 04:15:39 AM by Jackitup »
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Water
« Reply #12 on: Today at 05:53:32 AM »
Has anyone here tried distilled water? I really never thought much about using anything but tap water. I wonder if the chlorine has any effect.
apizza,

Tom Lehmann advocates against using distilled water, as noted at Reply 3 at:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=37138.msg370803;topicseen#msg370803

Another dough expert, Didier Rosada, also advocates against using distilled water, as he discusses in this very good article on water, at:

http://web.archive.org/web/20140913142947/http://elclubdelpan.com/en/master_book/water-functions-baking

Peter


Online waltertore

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Re: Water
« Reply #13 on: Today at 06:27:48 AM »
I have made  pizzas, bagels, breads, with city water, bottled water, well water, filtered water,  in NYC, NJ, OH, TX, AZ, CA, WA, Brussels Belguim,  and the pizzas and breads came out fine in all places unless I screwed it up.  The proof is NYC pizzas have gone way down in quality overall but the water is the same as it always has been.  The ingredients and process you use will be the main factors in how you product turns out.  Walter

Offline apizza

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Re: Water
« Reply #14 on: Today at 08:09:12 AM »
apizza,

Tom Lehmann advocates against using distilled water, as noted at Reply 3 at:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=37138.msg370803;topicseen#msg370803

Another dough expert, Didier Rosada, also advocates against using distilled water, as he discusses in this very good article on water, at:

http://web.archive.org/web/20140913142947/http://elclubdelpan.com/en/master_book/water-functions-baking


Peter

Thanks for the info Peter. The second article mentions chlorine effects. I'm going to email my water company and see what the chlorine content of our water is. I'm guessing it's below 10 PPM mentioned as effecting yeast performance.
OK no distilled.
Marty

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Re: Water
« Reply #15 on: Today at 09:35:34 AM »
Thanks for the info Peter. The second article mentions chlorine effects. I'm going to email my water company and see what the chlorine content of our water is. I'm guessing it's below 10 PPM mentioned as effecting yeast performance.
OK no distilled.
Marty

If the chlorine in your tap water is anywhere near 10PPM, you should probably pack up and move. It should be around 0.5PPM, and the maximum average the EPA will allow is 4PPM.
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Water
« Reply #16 on: Today at 11:50:12 AM »
OK no distilled.
Marty
Marty,

Distilled water can be used for dough but is not the preferred form and may require some adjustment. Tom Lehmann addresses the matter of using distilled water for dough many years ago, as I discussed in Reply 23 at:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=571.msg5936#msg5936

Peter

Offline apizza

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Re: Water
« Reply #17 on: Today at 12:04:07 PM »
Marty,

Distilled water can be used for dough but is not the preferred form and may require some adjustment. Tom Lehmann addresses the matter of using distilled water for dough many years ago, as I discussed in Reply 23 at:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=571.msg5936#msg5936

Peter

Thanks for the info. It appears that at this time Tom Lehmann prefers non distilled water due to the mineral content, based on your reference to
 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=37138.msg370803;topicseen#msg370803

I'll stick to tap, but I find this discussion interesting.
Marty