Author Topic: Flour  (Read 709 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Flour
« Reply #20 on: Yesterday at 10:17:35 AM »
Mark,

It is not a requirement that one let a pizza rest before eating unless it is likely that the pizza will burn one's mouth. But resting will let the molten cheese congeal somewhat so that it doesn't spread too much if the pizza is cut immediately after it is removed from the oven. But some people actually like the stretch of the cheese when picking up a hot slice. There is actually a lot of chemistry and physics involved in a cooling baked product. That is one of the reasons why delivery or takeout pizza is different than one eaten right out of the oven.

As for the use of a perforated disk, as I noted in my last post I only used a pizza screen (14") for my PJ clones since I was trying to emulate the baking of real PJ pizzas as much as I could. For the same reason, I did not use a pizza stone. However, one of the things I learned over the years is that a pizza dough with a lot of sugar, which describes a PJ dough, will do better in a home oven with a pizza stone than in a commercial oven, such as a commercial deck oven. In such an oven, the bottom will burn or turn brown too quickly, because of caramelization of the sugars, and for that reason commercial pizza doughs often contain little or no added sugar. Sugar in a pizza dough is less likely to lead to excessive bottom crust browning or burning with a pizza stone in a standard home oven because of stone conductivity and heat retention factors that differ from commercial stones. Some of our member apparently discovered these phenomena when they tried baking PJ clone pizzas on stones in their home ovens. But, even then, one has to monitor the bake of the pizza so that it doesn't end up with a burned or overly charred bottom crust.

I would think that the Robin Hood bread flour would be a good choice for a PJ clone dough. And it is hard to imagine that it would be responsible for the taste you described if the pizza was properly baked. In your case, maybe there was some underbaked dough or one with a gum line that translated into an off flavor.

You can use ADY instead of IDY but you have to adjust the amount of ADY to be equivalent to the amount of IDY called for in the recipes you used, and you also have to prehydrate the ADY in a portion of the total formula water (about 4-5 times the weight of the ADY) at about 105 degrees F for about ten minutes before adding the prehydrated ADY to the rest of the formula water (which should not be as warm as the water used to prehydrate the ADY) and the other dough ingredients. You can see typical yeast conversion data at http://www.theartisan.net/convert_yeast_two.htm. If you used the same amount of ADY as the amount of IDY called for in the recipes you used and you did not prehydrate the ADY, that could have dramatically slowed down the amount and rate of fermentation of the dough and could have adversely affected the results you got.

Peter


Online vtsteve

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Re: Flour
« Reply #21 on: Yesterday at 10:19:25 AM »
... I came across the same problem with these as I had with other dough recipes.  The dough comes out tasting and smelling like it is raw.  What am I doing wrong? 

I usually use a pizza stone in my electric oven - this time I used a circle baking pan because I didnt have a circle stone.  My stone is square. 

I followed the instructions in the recipe exactly.

An under-fermented dough won't bake up properly... can you post a picture of your dough in a clear container, shot from below? If the dough is properly fermented, it doesn't matter if you're using IDY or ADY.

Following the instructions doesn't matter as much as baking the dough when it is ready. You may need to adjust your timing based on your local conditions.

Have you verified your oven temp with a thermometer?

Offline mcease

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Re: Flour
« Reply #22 on: Yesterday at 09:20:07 PM »
I'm going to give the 2 day clone another shot using idy and see my results. Unfortunatly I don't have any pics. I will take some this time and report back my results.  In regards to my other question on using a bread mixer to mix the dough - what will that do to the pizza? Just curious if it's different than using a kitchenaid mixer.

Oh an no I havny verified my oven temp. Is that something I should do?  I just purchased the igrill for my bbq. I assume I could use this for my oven. Do you use a ambient temperature probe for measuring the temp?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Flour
« Reply #23 on: Yesterday at 10:13:09 PM »
In regards to my other question on using a bread mixer to mix the dough - what will that do to the pizza? Just curious if it's different than using a kitchenaid mixer.
Mark,

The answer to your question depends to a large degree on your bread maker. Many bread makers tend to overwork the dough to the point where the gluten reaches full development. That is desirable for bread dough, which is why one uses a bread maker, but usually not as good for pizza dough, which benefits more from a slight underkneading. However, since you are after a crust that is more breadlike, then it might be a good idea for you to use your bread maker to make the next batch of dough.

Peter

Offline mcease

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Re: Flour
« Reply #24 on: Today at 10:35:02 AM »
However, since you are after a crust that is more breadlike, then it might be a good idea for you to use your bread maker to make the next batch of dough.

Since I don't have a bread maker, can I use my kitchen-aid mixer or knead by hand to achieve those results?  I assume I can just add more kneading time?  If so, how much more time should I knead. 

Its worth a try, and this way I will know if it is truly the taste that I am after.