Author Topic: Shaping pan pizza dough  (Read 238 times)

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Offline NigelT

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Shaping pan pizza dough
« on: August 23, 2015, 10:41:59 AM »
All of the pan pizza recipes I have seen say to place the dough ball in the pan and slightly flatten it, then leave it to sit for 2 hours so it relaxes and takes the shape of the pan. I have a 10" cast-iron skillet and wanted to make 2 or 3 pizzas, but I can't be waiting over 4 hours between my first and last pizza!

Is there a different (faster) way to shape pan pizza dough? There's got to be something because of the 3 pizza places I know that serve pan pizzas (Pizza Hut, Vern's and another small local pizzeria), none of them require 2 hour notice when ordering a pizza, they only need about 15 minutes. Would the method in the youtube video below be appropriate?  Or would rolling the dough out with a rolling pin be better? If so, is there a specific dough hydration range to be aiming for so that I don't get a sticky and unworkable dough? Most of the pan pizza dough recipes look overly sticky and impossible to work with.

I'm also guessing that if I were to shape it using one of the above methods that I'd want to take it easy with the counter-top flour, because the aforementioned pan pizza recipes don't require any extra flour for working with the dough so it might throw off the taste or texture or something.

Thanks for any advice on the matter.

Cheers,

Nigel

« Last Edit: August 23, 2015, 10:43:49 AM by NigelT »


Offline NigelT

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Re: Shaping pan pizza dough
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2015, 02:21:47 AM »
Nobody here has any experience with pan pizza?

Offline vtsteve

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Re: Shaping pan pizza dough
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2015, 02:26:35 AM »
Get another skillet?   :angel:
In grams we trust.

Offline norma427

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Re: Shaping pan pizza dough
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2015, 08:49:42 AM »
Nigel,

Most pans doughs do need to be shaped for the pan and then risen again.  You can also use oil to open up a pan dough.  The oil makes it easier to open up a cold dough if you don't want to wait until the dough is warmer.  Most pizzerias either have humidified warmers, or racks where they let the dough rise before the pizzas are baked.  You can just pressed out the dough with oil and then bake.  It won't have the same characteristics in the crumb as when letting it proof again.  A dock docker could also be used if you want to be able to open up the dough faster.  A pan dough doesn't necessarily have to be a sticky dough.  A regular dough can be used in a pan.  Most pan dough have some kind of oil in pan before the dough is baked.

Norma

Offline IndyRob

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Re: Shaping pan pizza dough
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2015, 06:54:37 PM »
I make pan pizzas all the time, but perhaps thinner than you're looking for.  I like to flour the back of the pan and roll out the dough there to get the size right.  Then I flip the pan over and place the rolled dough into the oiled pan.  At this point I like to cover the pan and let the dough rise a bit (30-60 minutes), but I'm not sure that's necessary depending on the style you'd like to make.

When you see a pizza made at Pizza Hut, keep in mind that they have about one zillion pans per location (okay, maybe about 50).  They're not taking a pan out of the oven and immediately using it again.

As far as bench flour goes, use only as much as you need to keep the dough from sticking to the pan (or to itself).

I should also say that a cast iron skillet should be viewed as a specialty pan for certain applications.  Not a general purpose pizza pan.  They have valuable, but very specific properties.  Most notably, they retain heat exceptionally well, but only after they are allowed to gather heat over an extended period.

Offline NigelT

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Re: Shaping pan pizza dough
« Reply #5 on: Yesterday at 04:09:45 PM »
Thanks Norma for the advice. So for example I could take Peter's PJ clone dough and turn it into a pan pizza with oil instead of baking it directly on a pizza stone? If so, I may have to try that sometime.

Thanks for the advice as well, IndyRob. I realize that most pizza places have a lot of pans but I was mainly referring to the fact that it only takes around 15 minutes for the ordered pizza to be completed; 2-3 minutes to prepare it and 5-9 to bake it depending on location, leaving the rest for an incredibly short second rise. Granted I suppose most of the pan pizzas I have ordered before don't have thick crusts or airy crumbs, so it's likely that they didn't get a second rise in the pan. I suppose that answered my question.

I think I'm going to buy a 14" steel/aluminum pizza pan, because those are sold in stores here for cheap. A 10" cast-iron skillet is around $70 here and a 12" is $100. They're cheaper on Amazon but the cost of shipping a big, heavy chunk of cast-iron brings the shipping cost up to what they normally cost here anyway.

Bench and pan flour turned out not to be an issue when I made a pan pizza using a 17"x11" baking sheet, the stickiness went away after kneading for an extended period of time.


One final question though: which vegetable oil is best to use? The recipe I used called for 475F and the recipe by xPHmgr calls for 500F, but the smoke point of most oils is below that, except for refined safflower oil (510F), avocado oil (520F) and soybean oil (495F). I used canola oil (400F) without realizing and needless to say it smoked and left some dark residue on the bottom of my pizza crust.

Offline norma427

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Re: Shaping pan pizza dough
« Reply #6 on: Yesterday at 11:02:43 PM »
Thanks Norma for the advice. So for example I could take Peter's PJ clone dough and turn it into a pan pizza with oil instead of baking it directly on a pizza stone? If so, I may have to try that sometime.


Nigel,

Yes, I think you could use your Peter's PJ clone dough and turn it into a pan pizza with oil instead of baking it directly on the pizza stone. If you quickly look through the photos at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=26385.0  you can see what other members and I did with using the dough normally used for round pizzas in pans.

Norma


 

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