Author Topic: I'm sorry, I didn't search as hard as I should have .......... but .....  (Read 1781 times)

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Offline Iceman

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Do we have a BOBOLI crust recipe here somewhere?

Thanks in advance.
It is better to eat pizza with friends than to eat sprouts alone.


Offline Lydia

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I dont recall one on the site
BUT

I have a few recipes for a boboli type crust. My favortie is at the King Aurthur website: I think this is the best copycat.

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/getrecipe.php/id/R26

The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Online Pete-zza

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Iceman,

The Boboli product is essentially a par-baked crust in the nature of an Italian flatbread from which it was modeled. However, unlike most par-baked crusts that require refrigeration or freezing, the Boboli crust is unique in that it is shelf stable at room temperature for several days. To do this in a commercial setting, of course, requires using dough conditioners, preservatives, and the like. Many of these ingredients are not readily available to ordinary home bakers. On the other hand, as home pizza makers, we aren't trying to replicate crusts that can last five days at room temperature. That means that in a home setting most of the chemicals can be safely left out.

I had your post in mind when I was at the supermarket last night and took a look at the ingredients list of a 12-inch 10-ounce Boboli shell. The ingredients, in order, are essentially as follows: unbleached wheat flour (plus malt and B vitamins), water, palm oil, milk casein, mozzarella cheese, yeast, salt, sugar, preservatives (the usual suspects), modified starch, fumaric acid, whey, sodium phosphate, lactic acid, natural flavor, artificial color, garlic. If you look at the top of a Boboli shell, you will see brown spots or lines. That's from the mozzarella cheese that is sprinkled on top of the shell before baking. I suspect that the shell is baked on some kind of continuous conveyor, most likely after being pressed or die cut or sheeted, or whatever. I did not detect any screen markings or holes from docking.

What I see from the ingredient list that is notable is that a lot of oil is used, along with milk products, both of which will provide softness and tenderness in the crust. The yeast level is also high--higher than even salt, sugar, and everything else. I would guess that the dough for a Boboli shell is a same day dough and not cold fermented. I estimate that the thickness factor (TF) for a Boboli shell is around 0.09, which translates into a crust thickness that is a bit thinner than a typical thin NY style. The thickness factor may in fact be a little bit higher because the unbaked dough will be heavier than the baked shell. I would use a TF value of 0.10 or so. That would mean a dough ball weight of about 11.30 ounces for a single 12-inch shell.

If I were to try to replicate the Boboli product in a home setting, I would start with either malted all-purpose flour or bread flour (100%), around 58% water, 6% oil (using the Spectrum Organics palm oil product as a proxy for palm oil), 4% baker's grade dry milk (or a reasonable substitute), 3% low-fat, low-moisture mozzarella cheese (on top of the unbaked dough), 1.5% yeast (I would use IDY), 1.4% salt, 1% sugar, and 0.50% dry dairy whey. These are all ingredients that I either have or can get reasonably easily. I was amused to see garlic on the ingredient list--as the last ingredient. That means that there is less garlic in the Boboli product than any other ingredient. According to the Boboli website, only fresh garlic is used, If that is so, I suspect that a clove of garlic is just waved over the dough. More probably, it is garlic powder or its equivalent that starts its life as fresh garlic that is used in the dough at low dosages.

As with any formulation, some experimentation will be needed to get close to the real product. I have no idea as to whether the formulation I noted above will approximate a Boboli shell. I am going just on my best hunches based on what I know about typical ingredient percentages and their relationships and likely behavior when they are combined together in a dough. But if you would like me to translate the baker's percents for a single 12-inch dough ball weight so that you can experiment with it, let me know.

Peter

« Last Edit: December 31, 2010, 10:05:08 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Buffalo

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Pete-zza
Have you ever thought of teaching a short class on pizza making ???  I AM SERIOUS ;D
Your knowledge and skills (based on pictures of your finished product) are amazing.  I live 2 hours from the Dallas area and I take this opportunity to offer to be the first to sign up.
This is a serious question/request........
Buffalo

Online Pete-zza

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Buffalo,

Thank you for the nice compliment. However, I believe that just about everything I know about pizza making is already on the forum. That said, I'd be more than happy to answer any questions you have, either on the open forum or in IMs.

I have not thought to teach others on a formal basis because it has never been my intent to try to profit from what I know or do with respect to pizza making. My sole objective has always been to try to help others understand pizza making better and make better pizzas. In so doing, I learn as much from others as I myself give. That, and the interactivity of passionate pizza makers, makes the forum unique and special.

Peter

Offline Lydia

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There are many times I wish the information within this site was in a organized format that is easily searched, like a textbook would be. I have a binder full of Pizza Info about 5 inches thick, and it is still missing sooo much information. So as I thought more about it, the information here is always evovling. How would anyone be able to keep the documents accurate and up-to-date  ???

Locating the most current "version" or formula can be a bit tricky to locate and the glossary has been very helpful. When members help eachother to locate information within the site, it's not so bad.

Many Thanks - to the great members of this site!!!!!!
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.