Author Topic: Pizza Oven-Blodgett  (Read 3111 times)

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Offline diamondinvest

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Pizza Oven-Blodgett
« on: June 07, 2006, 03:34:13 AM »
Can you advise what temperature and for what length of time to cook a 12inch neapolitan style pizza on a blodgett ?
« Last Edit: June 07, 2006, 09:35:55 AM by Pete-zza »


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Oven-Blodgett
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2006, 09:39:16 AM »
diamondinvest,

Can you give us an idea on the type of flour you would be using to bake pizzas in the Blodgett?

Peter

Offline diamondinvest

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Re: Pizza Oven-Blodgett
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2006, 11:54:17 PM »
It will be OO flour.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Oven-Blodgett
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2006, 12:06:59 PM »
diamondinvest,

I didn’t forget you. I was awaiting a call back from my contact at the importer of the Caputo 00 flour, and the call came this morning. The answers I got for your questions is about 6 minutes for a 12-inch Neapolitan style in a deck oven (e.g., a Blodgett or Baker’s Pride), at around 500-525 degrees F and, for a conveyor oven, about 6-7 minutes at around 425-450 degrees F.

Of course, in any given setting, the answer will vary somewhat based on the model of oven used, the parameters of the pizzas, whether screens or disks are used, the desired throughput, etc. As you may know, if you research pizza deck ovens, like Baker's Pride and Blodgett ovens, and look at the specs, you will see that the oven temperatures generally range from about 500-550 degrees F (even though the specs may list an outside max. temperature of around 650 degrees F). From what I have read, as a practical matter most pizza operators tend to use 500-550 degrees F, and are happy to get a constant 525 degrees F temperature if they can (which is not always easy with the doors being frequently opened and closed, hot and cool spots, etc.) However, it is also common for some pizza operators to use lower bake temperatures, say, around 450 degrees F, and longer bake times if they are not under pressure to get the pizzas out in a real hurry. Generally speaking, conveyors, such as MM and Lincoln, typically run at around 435-450 degrees F for a thin crust pizza.

But whether you use a deck oven or a conveyor oven, you won’t get the degree of crust coloration with a Caputo 00 Pizzeria dough that you will get if you use a high-temperature oven that can deliver around 900 degrees F. The crust will be almost white or a light tan. If you look at photos on this forum of home-baked Caputo pies and compare them with photos of Caputo pies baked in an authentic Neapolitan oven, you will also see that the nature of the coloration will also be different. If a longer bake time is substituted for oven temperature in order to get more crust color, the Caputo pizzas are likely to become cracker-like, not soft and chewy. The Caputo 00 flour is simply not well adapted to low oven temperature, whether in the home or in professional settings.

Interestingly, I was told that there has been a lot of interest in the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour from conventional pizza operators. Many are looking at the Caputo product as an extension of their present product offerings, and there seems to be a general unwillingness to buy new, specialized ovens to make the Caputo pizzas. They prefer to use their existing ovens and, if possible, the same settings and operating temperatures and speeds and throughput (e.g., for conveyors). If possible, they would also prefer to use similar dough formulations. So, some are experimenting using Caputo 00 flours with sugar, oil, etc., in their dough formulations. Using sugar and oil may help to increase crust coloration and maintain some degree of softness in the crust and crumb, but the pies won’t have that authentic quality I mentioned. For some operators, that seems good enough. It may take a while to see how these experiments play out, but we shouldn't be surprised to see Caputo pies someday from conventional pizza operators using their existing equipment.

Peter

Offline diamondinvest

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Re: Pizza Oven-Blodgett
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2006, 07:03:09 PM »
Appreciated. Thanks


 

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