Author Topic: pizza hut diffrence "all american pan "and "magic (signature pan) pan pizza "  (Read 176 times)

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Offline munish12345

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hello all


             I was just browsing pizza hut India's menu in their iPhone app, they have mentioned " ALL AMERICAN PAN PIZZA "  with description saying soft and fluffy on the inside and crispy on the outside...the other one is their "MAGIC PAN PIZZA " and it says signature pizza hut...members please explain the difference...and i do believe that the recipe in the American style section by " xphmgr "   http://www.pizzamaking.com/panpizza.php  is for the all American pan pizza...does anyone has the recipe for magic pan or their signature or standard pan pizza. please share.


Offline Pete-zza

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Munish,

As best I can tell, the Magic Pan pizza is not one sold by PH in the U.S. It seems to be a pizza sold in India: http://pizzahut.co.in/dinein/store-locator.php. Years ago, PH used to disclose the ingredients for its pizzas but it stopped that practice. In fact, some of the old links to PH ingredients documents no longer work, although some can be found using the Wayback Machine. However, it still provides Nutrition information, including for the Magic Pan pizza, as you can see at http://pizzahut.co.in/dinein/Nutrition.pdf.

In the U.S., PH has gone mostly, if not exclusively, to frozen dough for its stores. From what our members report, the pizzas are not as good as those that PH used to make and sell years ago, before they went to frozen dough. It is quite possible that PH may be using fresh dough in some countries outside of the U.S., but I don't know if that is true of India. You might get in touch with PH/India and inquire as to the ingredients used to make their dough. Sometimes they will reveal this information in private communications even if they do not reveal that information publicly. In the U.S., food companies have increasingly come under attack because of their secrecy about the ingredients they use to make their products. As a result, and to avoid adverse publicity that can quickly go viral over the Internet, they have become more open about what they do. I don't know if that is true in India.

Peter

Offline munish12345

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Thanks Peter

                                  You are always so helpful , i might be referring to the standard dough or the hand tossed dough , would we have a recipe for that in the forum before pizza hut went to frozen dough, i don't exactly know how long back would that be in your books or one of the members in the forum.

Offline Pete-zza

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Munish,

These are the Pizza Hut ingredients lists that I have found over the years:

http://www.espanol.pizzahut.com/menu/nutritioninfo/documents/ph_ingredients.pdf (2004)

http://www.pizzahut.com/Files/PDF/ph_ingredients.pdf (2006)

http://www.pizzahut.com/Files/PDF/PIZZA%20HUT%20INGREDIENT%20STATEMENTS%20September%202008.pdf (2008)

If you look at the pizza ingredient lists named Big New Yorker Dough, Hand-Tossed Style Dough, and Hand-Tossed Style Dough & Stuffed Crust Dough (2004 and 2006), I believe that those items might come closest to what you are looking for. Even then, because of the positioning of the yeast in the list of ingredients, it is likely that the doughs were frozen. By 2008 (the last document cited above), the ingredients list named Hand-Tossed Style Crust was loaded with chemicals that suggested frozen dough. Your best bet might be to use one of the Papa John's clone dough formulations as given in the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.0 but use more soybean oil by percent than high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). In your case, you would substitute regular corn syrup for the HFCS even though it is not an exact equivalent, or you can use sugar instead of the HFCS. You might also have to modify the PJ clone dough formulation to get the size of PH pizza you would like to make. I do not believe that PH and PJ use the same pizza sizes.

Without nutritional information for the three documents cited above, it is difficult to be more precise.

Good luck.

Peter