Author Topic: New members, please introduce yourselves here!  (Read 185751 times)

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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: New Member... Santos mixer help
« Reply #420 on: July 16, 2006, 09:59:15 AM »
My name is azbud and I want to thank you all for the great forum. You folks are the Masters of the art of making pizza. I am looking for a Santos mixer, a used one or a "low" priced new one. Any ideas where to locate? Thanks

Instawares historically has had the best price (although their speed and service has been heavily criticized on this forum). Unfortunately, there was a big list price increase last year (due to falling dollar?).

Bill/SFNM


Offline NewBaker

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #421 on: July 20, 2006, 09:54:40 AM »
Hello, All.

I love Pizza. I lived in Manhattan for 30 years and am accustomed to the Pizza I had there on a frequent basis. I want to re-create it here in Columbus, Ohio in my modest kitchen. I have been experimenting with bread baking (New York has some wonderful bakeries, too) so I have all the equipment I need.
I have been lurking on the forums for a couple of months and feel there is no better place to get information and advice from some VERY well seasoned Pizza makers.

Thank you ALL.

Offline pizza-anytime

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*Beginners luck* with pics
« Reply #422 on: July 22, 2006, 10:35:05 PM »
What an awesome site!
Hello everyone. I must thank you Steve for letting me join this incredible forum. I have been in the states for past 5 years and had never even worked with an oven before. But i have this real passion for trying to excel in the creation of something that i like to eat and just don't give up until i get it right.
Pan pizza is my all time favorite, just love the bready thick crust. i tried the recipe of pizza hut pan pizza from this website a couple of months back and call it beginners luck, it was great the first time i tried. The results are pretty consistent, even though i just use a regular 9 inch dark metal cake pan!
Here are a few pics. :pizza:
 






Offline pizzagirl

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #423 on: July 24, 2006, 07:17:08 PM »
I'm Pizza Girl from Phoenix Arizona, I have lived here since 1971. I have worked for major fast-food pizza chains in the past, and been on my own quest for the last year. I hope to bring to the table the best of phoenix in pics, reviews, and more ...   
Your worst day at Grimaldi's, is better than your best day fishing ...

Offline SLICEofSLOMON

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #424 on: July 28, 2006, 05:52:31 PM »
Greetings to All,

As Pete has posted, I've been lurking around this site for quite some time now and since I'm being mentioned, I think I should come out from the lurker mode to contribute to your lively discussions. This is the best amateur and semi-pro pizza site on the net. The level of attention to detail and passion is fantastic. As some of you may or may not know, I have been promoting the traditional methods and techniques of classic pizza for nearly 30 years. I learned how to make the original Lombardi formula from Gerry Lombardi and Jerry Pero (of Totonno's) in 1980 and have been the keeper of their legacy through the near extinction of that method and craft. That formula was very nearly lost, I saved it from oblivion because I was the only one around who cared about the honorable tradition and lost methods of how pizza was first made in the USA at the turn of the century. At the time, both Lombardi and Pero thought I was crazy to want to learn from them. They thought that they had come to the end of the line in terms of pizza and no one was interested in the kind of pizza they were producing. They thought that pizza was considered junk food and that the general consumer was no longer able to tell the difference between good pizza and bad.

The pizzeria owners that I interviewed at the same time, considered this handful of old-timers to be dinosaurs: their assessment was also that the general public couldn't tell the difference, so why not cut corners and turn a higher profit. They no longer looked at the old masters as the model, they looked to the mediocrity of the chains as the model. Pizza was in a sad state of affairs when I started to write The Pizza Book in the late 70's. I was pretty insulted by the fact that pizza operators thought that I--as a consumer--could not tell the difference between a good pizza and a bad pizza. At this point in the pizza industry, it was all about how to handle chemicals, additives, extenders and artificial fillers. The way they talked about producing pizza sounded like auto parts on an assembly line, not about food. This is what inspired me to write the book, because as a historian, I wanted to record the dying art for posterity and I wanted to distill the commercial information that I had garnered for home cooks because they were the only ones who were interested in using the quality of ingredient, and the hand craft necessary to produce pizza in the classic manner.

When I wrote The Pizza Book, I had enough of a difficult time to convince my publishers to allow for the first 75 pages of the book to be solid text, tracing the history, catagorizing the various styles and covering the ingredients and equipment for producing great pizza at home. The Pizza Book was the first book to define and catagorize the various American styles: New York, Chicago, California, New Haven and others. As a historian, who was taking a leave of absence from completing her final doctoral dissertation, I decided to research and write the history of pizza instead of my dissertation. Nearly all of the pizza books that have been written since freely borrow from my history and use my definitions and classifications. No one had ever taken a look at pizza across the USA and put it all together by breaking it up into regional styles as I had done.

I wanted to be far more detailed in regards to the ingredients, and especially with the flour, but my publishers insisted upon concentrating on what was available to the home cook, which was AP flour and bread flour, both of which varied greatly from region to region (and still do). There was a prejudice about pizza, no one wanted to take it too seriously, not my publishers, not the pizza industry and not the Italian Cultural Institute in New York City where I did a lot of research and where I came up upon some serious prejudice regarding Southern Italian culture and cuisine. Pizza was simply something they did not want anything to do with. Oh how things have changed in that respect.

After my book was published in 1984, I became the chef de cuisine at Pizzico Restaurant in NYC, and settled down to creating pizzas utilizing the Lombardi formula that I embraced. I made my own mozzarella every day, used authentic San Marzano tomatoes and hand-produced salumi and sausages as well as other esoterica. This was long before any mention of Artisan took place, but it was most certainly artisan.

Twenty years ago, I began to conduct seminars and write for Pizza Today because they thought that the pizza industry should know what I was doing. For nearly a decade, I was the only voice in the industry who called for the return to traditional hand methods and of extreme attention to the detail of the basic holy trinity of pizza ingredients: flour, tomatoes and cheese. I was the first to write about wood-burning ovens and to champion their use within the industry. Believe it or not, they were first thought of as a dumb piece of showy equipment that could not produce any kind of volume.

I met Tom Lehman at my first Pizza Expo in the mid-eighties and was very impressed with his dough knowledge, despite the fact that the recipe and methods he was teaching was loaded with enhancers, conditioners and additives as regular ingredients. It seems that Tom was equally as impressed with my seminars. Years later, when we became great friends, he shared with me that he had come to Pizzico and that the pizza he had, blew his mind: it was the best pizza he had ever eaten. He returned to AIB and tried to reverse engineer it, but could not. There were spys sent to check out the garbage for flour sacks, but no one could get the secret. I was aware that people were trying to get my recipe, but since I was the only one making the dough, and the formula wasn't written down, it would be pretty hard to find out.

You see, the Lombardi formula was lost to commercial pizza, no one within the industry had any kind history with this type of pizza, and they had no idea how to approach making it. A formula as short as mine with only 4 ingredients was unheard of. Time and labor were dirty words, and fermentation was something that was brought on with enhancers and dough conditioners. Long slow fermentation? Crust color, flavor and texture development without enhancers and conditioners? Fahgedaboutit. Tom was convinced that this type of authentic pizza was something that AIB should know about, so he invited me to teach at one of their first Pizza Technology seminars. I told him that I would have to take the course before I taught, so the first time, I was a student. The course rocked my pizza universe! It gave me the tools to understand all formulas and how to marry science and art. I gave Tom the New York formula that is still used at AIB today--and is the formula that you all refer to in this site as the Lehman formula. I brought traditional techniques and hand production to AIB. I've been teaching there on and off ever since. Tom and I have taught together for about 16 years now, and we still learn so much from each other because both of us are always trying to learn more.

Now that I am at PMQ, I will be writing a monthly column on artisan, hand techniques, who's doing it, the ingredient producers and equipment manufacturers--everyone involved in furthering the craft and tradition of pizza. I am also looking to bring serious amateurs and aspiring pros such as yourselves into the mix. In the future, I hope to open competitions and seminars to  non-professionals as well, because I believe they are a vital part of the world of pizza. When I wrote The Pizza Book, it was geared to the home cook, little did I know that it would become the handbook for the revival of the craft of pizzamaking by the home cooks who bought it, and were inspired to go pro.

So, if you don't mind, I will continue to mostly lurk, but will come out from time to time to be of some help if I can--and most certainly add to the mix

Evelyne

Offline scott r

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #425 on: July 28, 2006, 06:36:21 PM »
I am SOOOOO excited to know that you will be helping us all out on our quest for better pizza.  I think I can speak for everyone when I say that we are truly honored.  Welcome to the forum!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #426 on: July 28, 2006, 06:50:19 PM »
Evelyne,

I'm delighted to see you join the forum. As you know, I am a lurker at the PMQ Think Tank, because that is the best place to learn about how professional pizza operators work. It is also where I have learned much of what I know about pizza making from the master, Tom Lehmann, through his many writings, many of which I liberally quote, cite and cut and paste at this forum. Now, with you joining the forum, I hope to learn even more.

Peter

Offline SLICEofSLOMON

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #427 on: July 29, 2006, 02:59:10 PM »
Hi All,

Thank you for the warm welcome, I look forward to contributing and to learning.

Along with Gerry Lombardi and Jerry Pero, Tom has been one of my most influential mentors. A few days ago, he and I spent several hours on the phone, discussing biochemical gluten development in direct and indirect methods of dough production. It was a short conversation, only about 3 hours! I love working with him because we really do inspire each other. Plus, the experience of teaching at AIB has been priceless. When I first taught there. they conducted the industrial pizza technology seminar along with the small operators courses. I used to duck out of the mass production classes because I'd already gone through the whole thing once, and didn't want to have to sit through the whole half day presentation of the industrial pizza production, makeup and blast freezing line seminar. Instead, I would hang out in the library with Ron Wirtz to talk about our research into artisan bread. Ron and I became immediate pals when I spoke of integrating some of Calvel's techniques and other classic bread techniques to pizza. I had the French edition of Le Gout du Pain and Ron was in the process of translating the book into English. so that created a spark between us.  As you might imagine, there weren't a lot of people around who had even heard of Calvel, much less espousing his techniques. Ron turned me on to a number of great baking books that were only available in French. (I'm fluent in French) so I got my hands on those as well and experimented with adapting many of the techniques to pizza. Artisan bread baking was starting to become popular--at least in California and especially in Berkeley, which is where I live. I'm hoping the artisan pizza movement will take off as well.

It is so exciting to see the interest and passion with which you all pursue pizza making as an art. I am very optimistic that this will grow into a viable pursuit amoung commercial pizza makers both from the technical and philosphical end and the consumer appreciation end.







Next week I will be talking with him on Pizza Radio at PMQ and we will be talking about our personal experiences within the industry from the fifties on. I don't know when PMQ will make it available, but I will let you know.

Offline SLICEofSLOMON

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #428 on: July 29, 2006, 03:00:56 PM »
Um, sorry,

"Him" is Tom Lehmann...we'll be talking on PMQ Pizza Radio. I'll let you all know when it will be available to listen to...

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #429 on: July 29, 2006, 04:46:51 PM »
Evelyne,

It strikes me that even Tom had become more interested of late in using preferments, such as biga- or poolish-like preferments, as a way of getting more and better crust flavors, including for take-and-bake, which I experimented with using his NY style dough recipe as the starting point. Similarly, some of our members who are also bread makers occasionally experiment with using bread-making techniques in their pizza dough making. For example, one of our members, sebdesn (Bud), wrote about using the three-step French levain technique, which I understand also comes from Professor Calvel, at Reply 9, et. seq., at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2238.msg20748.html#msg20748. If I am not mistaken, Prof. Calvel is still alive, possibly in his 90s.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 29, 2006, 04:48:25 PM by Pete-zza »


Offline bolabola

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #430 on: July 30, 2006, 03:22:41 PM »
It's exciting to have you share your knowledge here at pizzamaking.com Evelyne..I'll have to get your book..
I read your biography on your dough making experience with great interest..

however I have to disagree with you on how pizza making became a lost art..
at least in Brooklyn it didn't..the pizza I had there in the 60's was still made the same way as in the 40's and 50's and still tastes the same today acording to my old friends back east..the last time I was in Brooklyn in 83 nothing had changed..most of the Pizza makers there run their shops by themselves or with family,buy locally made mozzerella and make a great sauce..they take great pride in making their dough with the best ingredients and have been in business for 50 + years doing it the same way..
Without a doubt I agree with you that comerical pizza was all about profit and went to hell..pizza chains I think are starting to learn that consumers demand more quality now..even frozen pizza is getting better..I think California kitchen makes a pretty decent frozen product..

looking forward to the PMQ radio show..I live in the SF bay area and hope you can give me the station in my area..

thanks for all the great info and continued success to you..

charlie
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Offline abc

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #431 on: July 30, 2006, 03:41:02 PM »
Evelyn, when are you finally releasing a update to your Pizza book?  I imagine it would be stunning and I'm sure you'd be able to now write and produce it as artisanry as the pizza you desire to be out there can be.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2006, 03:43:52 PM by abc »

Offline SLICEofSLOMON

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #432 on: July 30, 2006, 06:38:03 PM »
Hi Charlie,

When I mean lost, or nearly lost I am talking about the Lombardi formula, as it was made at the turn of the 19th century and not the art of pizza making, although it was surely on its way to being a lost art. The only local pizzamaker who was still practising that recipe, exactly as it was made in 1905 was Jerry Pero of Totonno's. There's no denying that there are and were family owned operations in Brooklyn, Bronx and Queens that produced hand-made pizza, but on the scale comparable to Totonno's, there were only a handful.( if that many) Unfortunately, since Jerry passed away, the various Totonno's pizzerias still make a great pizza, but not like the master did.  For those who've experienced a genuine Totonno's pizza from the hands of Jerry Pero, they know what I am talking about. Chris Bianco knows, before he got started at Bianco's we confered on how to achieve that same sumblime pizza.We shared the same desire to achieve that specific type of pizza. It was like pizza of the Gods.  By the 50's, New York Style pizza had already undergone a number of subtle changes from the old fashioned hand-mixed recipes. The advent of the mixer and deck oven changed the character of the pizza. I don't mean this in a bad way, I mean it is different because it is handled differently.

By the 80's, the Lombardi formula was virtually extinct on a commercial level and the guys who you speak of in Brooklyn, were branded as dinosaurs as well. The few hold outs in the New York Metropolitan area and in different pockets in the Northeast (like Pepe's and Sally's in New Haven) were the only ones still practising within that tradition. The pizza industry completely ingnored these masters, it was the chains and pizza as a cheap fast food that was the role model for people to get into the pizza business. Thank God some families are still around and producing pizza like in the old days, it gives future genrations something to look up to.

Unfortunately, The Pizza Book is out of print, but it is easily available used at Amazon and others. I do not plan on resurrecting it because I have been at work on another pizza book for the last few years. I am putting the finishing touches on a proposal for a publishing company. Hopefully, they will take on the project.

In the mean time, I will be writing a regular feature for PMQ that focuses on artisan pizza: the people doing it, their techniques, equipment manufacturers and ingredient producers. PMQ is behind getting the message out there and I am looking to create artisan role models for aspiring pizza pros.

Offline bolabola

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #433 on: July 31, 2006, 02:42:57 AM »
Thank you for that clarification Evelyne..
as you can tell I'm very protective of my Brooklyn Pizza roots :-[ :)

I agree with you on everything you have said and wish I had had the privilage of having tasted the genuine Totono's and Lombardi formula..
but all said and done the art of making great pizza is still alive and prosperious thanks to all the people like you,Tom Lehmann,Peter and just us plain folks that appreciate how pizza can be done at home far better then your local pizzarea with the love of fine ingredients and the commitment to quality ..
thankfully this knowledge will never be lost thanks to Pizza fans such as us..

I'll be looking forward to your new book and also check out Amazon.com as to your old book..

as for artisan bread making I know there has been a huge breakout since the 80's for this style of bread in the SF bay area even here in the northbay but I still stick to my guns when it comes to Franco American( Santa Rosa),Boulangerie Bay Bread(pine street SF) and Bordinavis in San Rafael)




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Offline Buffalo

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #434 on: July 31, 2006, 09:48:41 AM »
Dear Ms. Slomon;
I took the AIB Pizza Technology course last year and was amazed at how much was taught.  I honestly believe that you, of all the instructors there, stood "head and shoulders" above with regard to your knowledge and teachings of pizza making.  I thoroughly enjoyed your formulas and was pleasantly surprised at how much I liked your "RETRO" pizza. I was fortunate enough to purchase your book from Amazon and it was the best $25 I have spent on any pizza book.   I strongly recommend your book and also highly recommend your pizza classes.  I consider myself very fortunate to have been one of your students.
Buffalo ;D

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #435 on: July 31, 2006, 09:57:25 AM »
Buffalo,

You aren't the only Evelyne Slomon fan. One of our members (now inactive), BIG Daddy, who took the AIB course in preparation for starting his own pizza business, was also impressed with Evelyne, as he noted in Reply 7 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1888.msg17884.html#msg17884.

Peter

Offline bolabola

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #436 on: July 31, 2006, 01:23:13 PM »
I just read BIG Daddy's post Peter..
I'll be making that trip to the AIB Pizza Technology coarse one of these days..
I found this last post by Daniel interesting

Hi Big daddy!

thanks for sharing your learning, this will be very good for us.

Now a wish to this forum.
I read a lot here that some (or a lot) of user of this forum has or will have a pizzaria/store/shop..etc. Would be nice if his website
has a page like an address book to record where the users from this forum has your business. So, when someone make a trip, who knows, can visit a friends.

Bests,
Daniel

did BIG Daddy ever opened his place???where is it??and have other members here at pizzamaking.com who opened a Pizzaria ever posted their location???
Pizza Rocks

Offline SLICEofSLOMON

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #437 on: July 31, 2006, 05:13:28 PM »
Hey You Guys,

You're making me embarassed--but happliy so.

I will be giving 2 seminars on New York Pizza and a the Lombardi Formula at the PMQ show in Orlando on Sept 8-10, if any of you have a chance to come by--please do.

Offline prem

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #438 on: August 01, 2006, 05:17:12 AM »
 :)
Hi,
  I happened to see the email in the newspaper today.
  Since i am a pizza freak and we in India do not have any such dedicated site, i thought i shall become a member and learn ore about pizza making.
  Hi to all memebrs and hope to learn many things from you :)

Offline bolabola

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Re: New members, please introduce yourselves here!
« Reply #439 on: August 01, 2006, 06:21:39 PM »
Welcome prem..
this is the place to learn..
have fun and hopefully you can find the proper ingredients you need in India..
how is the quality of the flour there??
Pizza Rocks


 

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